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Needs assessment of Wisconsin primary care residents and faculty regarding interest in global health training.

Bauer TA, Sanders J - BMC Med Educ (2009)

Bottom Line: The survey indicates that adequate faculty in Wisconsin could provide mentorship in international health as 47% (55) of faculty had experience working as a physician internationally, 49% (58) of faculty spend more than 25% clinical time caring for patient from underserved communities and 39% (46) would be willing to be involved with developing curriculum, lecturing and/or mentoring residents in international health.Overall, the majority of the respondents expressed high interest in IH and few felt prepared to address IH issues indicating a need for increased training in this area.The findings of this survey are likely relevant as a prototype for other primary care residencies.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Family Medicine Department, Aurora-University of Wisconsin Medical Group, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. terese.bauer@aurora.org

ABSTRACT

Background: The primary objectives of this study were to assess Wisconsin's primary care residents' attitudes toward international health training, the interest among faculty to provide IH training, and the preferred modality of IH training.

Methods: Surveys were administered using 505 residents and 413 medical faculty in primary care residencies in Wisconsin. Results from 128 residents and 118 medical school faculty members were collected during the spring of 2007 and analyzed.

Results: In total, 25% of residents (128/505) and 28% of faculty (118/413) responded to the survey. A majority of residents (58%) and faculty (63%) were interested in global health issues. Among residents, 63% planned on spending professional time working abroad. Few residents (9%) and faculty (11%) assess their residencies as preparing residents well to address topics relating to international health. The survey indicates that adequate faculty in Wisconsin could provide mentorship in international health as 47% (55) of faculty had experience working as a physician internationally, 49% (58) of faculty spend more than 25% clinical time caring for patient from underserved communities and 39% (46) would be willing to be involved with developing curriculum, lecturing and/or mentoring residents in international health.

Conclusion: Overall, the majority of the respondents expressed high interest in IH and few felt prepared to address IH issues indicating a need for increased training in this area. The findings of this survey are likely relevant as a prototype for other primary care residencies.

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Please rank the following medical training programs in order of your interest. Residents (Faculty).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 2: Please rank the following medical training programs in order of your interest. Residents (Faculty).

Mentions: Residents and faculty were asked to rank medical training programs, clinical experiences, and barriers in order of importance as they pertain to IH training (see figures 2, 3, 4). In addition to the barriers in the rank list, residents and faculty cited the following barriers: family medicine outpatient requirements from the ACGME; available, trustworthy international sites for clinical experiences; family commitments; restrictions on funding of residents; and a limit of 1 month elective abroad.


Needs assessment of Wisconsin primary care residents and faculty regarding interest in global health training.

Bauer TA, Sanders J - BMC Med Educ (2009)

Please rank the following medical training programs in order of your interest. Residents (Faculty).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2713225&req=5

Figure 2: Please rank the following medical training programs in order of your interest. Residents (Faculty).
Mentions: Residents and faculty were asked to rank medical training programs, clinical experiences, and barriers in order of importance as they pertain to IH training (see figures 2, 3, 4). In addition to the barriers in the rank list, residents and faculty cited the following barriers: family medicine outpatient requirements from the ACGME; available, trustworthy international sites for clinical experiences; family commitments; restrictions on funding of residents; and a limit of 1 month elective abroad.

Bottom Line: The survey indicates that adequate faculty in Wisconsin could provide mentorship in international health as 47% (55) of faculty had experience working as a physician internationally, 49% (58) of faculty spend more than 25% clinical time caring for patient from underserved communities and 39% (46) would be willing to be involved with developing curriculum, lecturing and/or mentoring residents in international health.Overall, the majority of the respondents expressed high interest in IH and few felt prepared to address IH issues indicating a need for increased training in this area.The findings of this survey are likely relevant as a prototype for other primary care residencies.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Family Medicine Department, Aurora-University of Wisconsin Medical Group, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. terese.bauer@aurora.org

ABSTRACT

Background: The primary objectives of this study were to assess Wisconsin's primary care residents' attitudes toward international health training, the interest among faculty to provide IH training, and the preferred modality of IH training.

Methods: Surveys were administered using 505 residents and 413 medical faculty in primary care residencies in Wisconsin. Results from 128 residents and 118 medical school faculty members were collected during the spring of 2007 and analyzed.

Results: In total, 25% of residents (128/505) and 28% of faculty (118/413) responded to the survey. A majority of residents (58%) and faculty (63%) were interested in global health issues. Among residents, 63% planned on spending professional time working abroad. Few residents (9%) and faculty (11%) assess their residencies as preparing residents well to address topics relating to international health. The survey indicates that adequate faculty in Wisconsin could provide mentorship in international health as 47% (55) of faculty had experience working as a physician internationally, 49% (58) of faculty spend more than 25% clinical time caring for patient from underserved communities and 39% (46) would be willing to be involved with developing curriculum, lecturing and/or mentoring residents in international health.

Conclusion: Overall, the majority of the respondents expressed high interest in IH and few felt prepared to address IH issues indicating a need for increased training in this area. The findings of this survey are likely relevant as a prototype for other primary care residencies.

Show MeSH