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Epidemiology of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy: prevalence, severity, determinants, and the importance of race/ethnicity.

Lacasse A, Rey E, Ferreira E, Morin C, Bérard A - BMC Pregnancy Childbirth (2009)

Bottom Line: Multivariate analyses showed that race/ethnicity was significantly associated with a decreased likelihood of reporting nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (Asians vs.Caucasians OR: 0.13; 95%CI 0.02-0.73; and Blacks vs.Caucasians OR: 0.29; 95%CI 0.09-0.99).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. anais.lacasse.morris@umontreal.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: Studies that contributed to the epidemiology of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy have reported conflicting findings, and often failed to account for all possible co-variables necessary to evaluate the multidimensional associations. The objectives of this study were to: 1) Estimate the prevalence and the severity of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy during the 1st and the 2nd trimester of pregnancy, and 2) Identify determinants of presence and severity of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy during the 1st and 2nd trimesters separately, with a special emphasis on the impact of race/ethnicity.

Methods: A prospective study including pregnant women attending the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Sainte-Justine or René-Laennec clinics for their prenatal care was conducted from 2004 to 2006. Women were eligible if they were > or = 18 years of age, and

Results: Of the 367 women included in the study, 81.2% were Caucasians, 10.1% Blacks, 4.6% Hispanics, and 4.1% Asians. Multivariate analyses showed that race/ethnicity was significantly associated with a decreased likelihood of reporting nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (Asians vs. Caucasians OR: 0.13; 95%CI 0.02-0.73; and Blacks vs. Caucasians OR: 0.29; 95%CI 0.09-0.99).

Conclusion: Our study showed that race/ethnicity was associated with the reporting of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy in the 1st trimester of pregnancy.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Study population recruitment and follow-up. *Maternal and gestational age at inclusion.
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Figure 1: Study population recruitment and follow-up. *Maternal and gestational age at inclusion.

Mentions: A detailed flow-chart of the recruitment, the refusals, and the follow-up is presented in Figure 1. Our study population consisted of 367 pregnant women recruited between 2004 and 2006. Maternal characteristics including race/ethnicity and NVP status of the study population are presented in Table 1. In the 1st trimester of pregnancy, 78.5% of women reported NVP. In this group, 52.2% experienced mild NVP, 45.3% moderate NVP, and 2.5% severe NVP. In addition, 26% of pregnant women reporting NVP also reported excessive salivation during the 1st trimester of pregnancy, and the majority of them were distressed by this situation (Table 1). When asking what women had used in their first trimester to ease nausea and vomiting, 20.4% of them reported having used medications, and 17.9% non-pharmacological methods. As for the 2nd trimester of pregnancy, 40.1% of women reported NVP (data not showed). Among them, 63.3% experienced mild NVP, 35.9% moderate NVP, and 0.8% severe NVP. Intensity of nausea and excessive salivation experience was similar to what had been reported in the 1st trimester of pregnancy. Globally, in our study population, 41.1% of women reported NVP in the 1st trimester of pregnancy only, 1.3% in the 2nd trimester of pregnancy only, and 38.9% in both of these two gestational periods.


Epidemiology of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy: prevalence, severity, determinants, and the importance of race/ethnicity.

Lacasse A, Rey E, Ferreira E, Morin C, Bérard A - BMC Pregnancy Childbirth (2009)

Study population recruitment and follow-up. *Maternal and gestational age at inclusion.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2713199&req=5

Figure 1: Study population recruitment and follow-up. *Maternal and gestational age at inclusion.
Mentions: A detailed flow-chart of the recruitment, the refusals, and the follow-up is presented in Figure 1. Our study population consisted of 367 pregnant women recruited between 2004 and 2006. Maternal characteristics including race/ethnicity and NVP status of the study population are presented in Table 1. In the 1st trimester of pregnancy, 78.5% of women reported NVP. In this group, 52.2% experienced mild NVP, 45.3% moderate NVP, and 2.5% severe NVP. In addition, 26% of pregnant women reporting NVP also reported excessive salivation during the 1st trimester of pregnancy, and the majority of them were distressed by this situation (Table 1). When asking what women had used in their first trimester to ease nausea and vomiting, 20.4% of them reported having used medications, and 17.9% non-pharmacological methods. As for the 2nd trimester of pregnancy, 40.1% of women reported NVP (data not showed). Among them, 63.3% experienced mild NVP, 35.9% moderate NVP, and 0.8% severe NVP. Intensity of nausea and excessive salivation experience was similar to what had been reported in the 1st trimester of pregnancy. Globally, in our study population, 41.1% of women reported NVP in the 1st trimester of pregnancy only, 1.3% in the 2nd trimester of pregnancy only, and 38.9% in both of these two gestational periods.

Bottom Line: Multivariate analyses showed that race/ethnicity was significantly associated with a decreased likelihood of reporting nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (Asians vs.Caucasians OR: 0.13; 95%CI 0.02-0.73; and Blacks vs.Caucasians OR: 0.29; 95%CI 0.09-0.99).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. anais.lacasse.morris@umontreal.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: Studies that contributed to the epidemiology of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy have reported conflicting findings, and often failed to account for all possible co-variables necessary to evaluate the multidimensional associations. The objectives of this study were to: 1) Estimate the prevalence and the severity of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy during the 1st and the 2nd trimester of pregnancy, and 2) Identify determinants of presence and severity of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy during the 1st and 2nd trimesters separately, with a special emphasis on the impact of race/ethnicity.

Methods: A prospective study including pregnant women attending the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Sainte-Justine or René-Laennec clinics for their prenatal care was conducted from 2004 to 2006. Women were eligible if they were > or = 18 years of age, and

Results: Of the 367 women included in the study, 81.2% were Caucasians, 10.1% Blacks, 4.6% Hispanics, and 4.1% Asians. Multivariate analyses showed that race/ethnicity was significantly associated with a decreased likelihood of reporting nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (Asians vs. Caucasians OR: 0.13; 95%CI 0.02-0.73; and Blacks vs. Caucasians OR: 0.29; 95%CI 0.09-0.99).

Conclusion: Our study showed that race/ethnicity was associated with the reporting of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy in the 1st trimester of pregnancy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus