Limits...
Influence of dendritic cells on viral pathogenicity.

Freer G, Matteucci D - PLoS Pathog. (2009)

Bottom Line: Although most viral infections cause minor, if any, symptoms, a certain number result in serious illness.Viral disease symptoms result both from direct viral replication within host cells and from indirect immunopathological consequences.Dendritic cells (DCs) are key determinants of viral disease outcome; they activate immune responses during viral infection and direct T cells toward distinct T helper type responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Retrovirus Center and Virology Section, Department of Experimental Pathology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. freer@biomed.unipi.it

ABSTRACT
Although most viral infections cause minor, if any, symptoms, a certain number result in serious illness. Viral disease symptoms result both from direct viral replication within host cells and from indirect immunopathological consequences. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key determinants of viral disease outcome; they activate immune responses during viral infection and direct T cells toward distinct T helper type responses. Certain viruses are able to skew cytokine secretion by DCs inducing and/or downregulating the immune system with the aim of facilitating and prolonging release of progeny. Thus, the interaction of DCs with viruses most often results in the absence of disease or complete recovery when natural functions of DCs prevail, but may lead to chronic illness or death when these functions are outmanoeuvred by viruses in the exploitation of DCs.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Some effects of viral interaction with DCs.Certain viruses, like RSV, infect DCs, replicate in them, and cause them to mature, while others, like several herpesviruses, dengue virus, and influenza virus, replicate and hinder maturation. Viruses like HPV do not replicate in DCs and are only presented as antigens, while others, like HIV, are concentrated and delivered to their target organs by DCs, which thereby increase the chances of virions to infect cells.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2712770&req=5

ppat-1000384-g002: Some effects of viral interaction with DCs.Certain viruses, like RSV, infect DCs, replicate in them, and cause them to mature, while others, like several herpesviruses, dengue virus, and influenza virus, replicate and hinder maturation. Viruses like HPV do not replicate in DCs and are only presented as antigens, while others, like HIV, are concentrated and delivered to their target organs by DCs, which thereby increase the chances of virions to infect cells.

Mentions: Distinct stages of DC generation may be altered by viral infection, from hematopoietic progenitor differentiation, to maturation, or even both (Figure 2) [38]. In mice, DC progenitors generated under the influence of IL-10 are able to give rise to a DC subset that induces antigen-specific expansion of functional CD4+CD25+ Treg cells with strong suppressive functions [44]. The role of Treg cells is normally to downregulate immune and inflammatory responses as part of the healing process, but they may be activated to create an immunosuppressive environment during certain viral infections.


Influence of dendritic cells on viral pathogenicity.

Freer G, Matteucci D - PLoS Pathog. (2009)

Some effects of viral interaction with DCs.Certain viruses, like RSV, infect DCs, replicate in them, and cause them to mature, while others, like several herpesviruses, dengue virus, and influenza virus, replicate and hinder maturation. Viruses like HPV do not replicate in DCs and are only presented as antigens, while others, like HIV, are concentrated and delivered to their target organs by DCs, which thereby increase the chances of virions to infect cells.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2712770&req=5

ppat-1000384-g002: Some effects of viral interaction with DCs.Certain viruses, like RSV, infect DCs, replicate in them, and cause them to mature, while others, like several herpesviruses, dengue virus, and influenza virus, replicate and hinder maturation. Viruses like HPV do not replicate in DCs and are only presented as antigens, while others, like HIV, are concentrated and delivered to their target organs by DCs, which thereby increase the chances of virions to infect cells.
Mentions: Distinct stages of DC generation may be altered by viral infection, from hematopoietic progenitor differentiation, to maturation, or even both (Figure 2) [38]. In mice, DC progenitors generated under the influence of IL-10 are able to give rise to a DC subset that induces antigen-specific expansion of functional CD4+CD25+ Treg cells with strong suppressive functions [44]. The role of Treg cells is normally to downregulate immune and inflammatory responses as part of the healing process, but they may be activated to create an immunosuppressive environment during certain viral infections.

Bottom Line: Although most viral infections cause minor, if any, symptoms, a certain number result in serious illness.Viral disease symptoms result both from direct viral replication within host cells and from indirect immunopathological consequences.Dendritic cells (DCs) are key determinants of viral disease outcome; they activate immune responses during viral infection and direct T cells toward distinct T helper type responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Retrovirus Center and Virology Section, Department of Experimental Pathology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. freer@biomed.unipi.it

ABSTRACT
Although most viral infections cause minor, if any, symptoms, a certain number result in serious illness. Viral disease symptoms result both from direct viral replication within host cells and from indirect immunopathological consequences. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key determinants of viral disease outcome; they activate immune responses during viral infection and direct T cells toward distinct T helper type responses. Certain viruses are able to skew cytokine secretion by DCs inducing and/or downregulating the immune system with the aim of facilitating and prolonging release of progeny. Thus, the interaction of DCs with viruses most often results in the absence of disease or complete recovery when natural functions of DCs prevail, but may lead to chronic illness or death when these functions are outmanoeuvred by viruses in the exploitation of DCs.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus