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The effects of overfeeding on the neuronal response to visual food cues in thin and reduced-obese individuals.

Cornier MA, Salzberg AK, Endly DC, Bessesen DH, Rojas DC, Tregellas JR - PLoS ONE (2009)

Bottom Line: The objective of this study was to examine the effects of short-term overfeeding on the neuronal response to food-related visual stimuli in individuals prone and resistant to weight gain. 22 thin and 19 reduced-obese (RO) individuals were studied.In the eucaloric state, food as compared to non-food images elicited significantly greater activation of insula and inferior visual cortex in thin as compared to RO individuals.Two days of overfeeding led to significant attenuation of not only insula and visual cortex responses but also of hypothalamus response in thin as compared to RO individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Diabetes, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado, United States of America. marc.cornier@ucdenver.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: The regulation of energy intake is a complex process involving the integration of homeostatic signals and both internal and external sensory inputs. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of short-term overfeeding on the neuronal response to food-related visual stimuli in individuals prone and resistant to weight gain.

Methodology/principal findings: 22 thin and 19 reduced-obese (RO) individuals were studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed in the fasted state after two days of eucaloric energy intake and after two days of 30% overfeeding in a counterbalanced design. fMRI was performed while subjects viewed images of foods of high hedonic value and neutral non-food objects. In the eucaloric state, food as compared to non-food images elicited significantly greater activation of insula and inferior visual cortex in thin as compared to RO individuals. Two days of overfeeding led to significant attenuation of not only insula and visual cortex responses but also of hypothalamus response in thin as compared to RO individuals.

Conclusions/significance: These findings emphasize the important role of food-related visual cues in ingestive behavior and suggest that there are important phenotypic differences in the interactions between external visual sensory inputs, energy balance status, and brain regions involved in the regulation of energy intake. Furthermore, alterations in the neuronal response to food cues may relate to the propensity to gain weight.

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Effects of overfeeding on the neuronal response in thin as compared to reduced-obese individuals.The difference in neuronal response with overfeeding as compared to eucaloric feeding in thin as compared to reduced-obese individuals in response to foods of high hedonic value is shown (EU>OF:Thin>OF:H>O). A. Greater deactivation of the insula, hypothalamus and visual cortex is noted in thin as compared to reduced-obese individuals. Statistical maps thresholded at p<0.01 for visualization and overlaid onto the group average anatomical image. Data are shown in the radiological convention (right hemisphere on the left). B. Mean BOLD responses (± SEM) are shown for the insula and hypothalamus.
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pone-0006310-g003: Effects of overfeeding on the neuronal response in thin as compared to reduced-obese individuals.The difference in neuronal response with overfeeding as compared to eucaloric feeding in thin as compared to reduced-obese individuals in response to foods of high hedonic value is shown (EU>OF:Thin>OF:H>O). A. Greater deactivation of the insula, hypothalamus and visual cortex is noted in thin as compared to reduced-obese individuals. Statistical maps thresholded at p<0.01 for visualization and overlaid onto the group average anatomical image. Data are shown in the radiological convention (right hemisphere on the left). B. Mean BOLD responses (± SEM) are shown for the insula and hypothalamus.

Mentions: Unlike in the thin cohort, overfeeding did not attenuate the neuronal responses seen in the eucaloric state in RO (RO:EU>OF:H>O). As shown in Figure 3A, overfeeding resulted in significantly greater deactivation of the right insula (t(1,75) = 3.13, p = 0.049), right inferior visual cortex (t(1,75) = 3.08, p = 0.025), and hypothalamus (t(1,75) = 3.47, p = 0.017) in thin as compared to RO individuals (EU>OF:Thin>RO:H>O). In other words, overfeeding did not attenuate the neuronal responses to food cues in these brain regions in RO individuals. An additional exploratory whole-brain analysis using a statistical threshold of p<0.005, uncorrected, showed that insular and visual cortex differences to be bilateral and additional differences in the hippocampus and inferior prefrontal cortex. Figure 3B shows neuronal responses for local maxima in the insula and hypothalamus, in terms of BOLD% signal change, relative to the global mean. These data suggest that differences are not solely driven by reduced responses to overfeeding in the RO cohort. Overfeeding in this group was associated with a trend towards increased activation of the hypothalamus (t(1,75) = 2.50, p = 0.1) (OF>EU:H>O).


The effects of overfeeding on the neuronal response to visual food cues in thin and reduced-obese individuals.

Cornier MA, Salzberg AK, Endly DC, Bessesen DH, Rojas DC, Tregellas JR - PLoS ONE (2009)

Effects of overfeeding on the neuronal response in thin as compared to reduced-obese individuals.The difference in neuronal response with overfeeding as compared to eucaloric feeding in thin as compared to reduced-obese individuals in response to foods of high hedonic value is shown (EU>OF:Thin>OF:H>O). A. Greater deactivation of the insula, hypothalamus and visual cortex is noted in thin as compared to reduced-obese individuals. Statistical maps thresholded at p<0.01 for visualization and overlaid onto the group average anatomical image. Data are shown in the radiological convention (right hemisphere on the left). B. Mean BOLD responses (± SEM) are shown for the insula and hypothalamus.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2712682&req=5

pone-0006310-g003: Effects of overfeeding on the neuronal response in thin as compared to reduced-obese individuals.The difference in neuronal response with overfeeding as compared to eucaloric feeding in thin as compared to reduced-obese individuals in response to foods of high hedonic value is shown (EU>OF:Thin>OF:H>O). A. Greater deactivation of the insula, hypothalamus and visual cortex is noted in thin as compared to reduced-obese individuals. Statistical maps thresholded at p<0.01 for visualization and overlaid onto the group average anatomical image. Data are shown in the radiological convention (right hemisphere on the left). B. Mean BOLD responses (± SEM) are shown for the insula and hypothalamus.
Mentions: Unlike in the thin cohort, overfeeding did not attenuate the neuronal responses seen in the eucaloric state in RO (RO:EU>OF:H>O). As shown in Figure 3A, overfeeding resulted in significantly greater deactivation of the right insula (t(1,75) = 3.13, p = 0.049), right inferior visual cortex (t(1,75) = 3.08, p = 0.025), and hypothalamus (t(1,75) = 3.47, p = 0.017) in thin as compared to RO individuals (EU>OF:Thin>RO:H>O). In other words, overfeeding did not attenuate the neuronal responses to food cues in these brain regions in RO individuals. An additional exploratory whole-brain analysis using a statistical threshold of p<0.005, uncorrected, showed that insular and visual cortex differences to be bilateral and additional differences in the hippocampus and inferior prefrontal cortex. Figure 3B shows neuronal responses for local maxima in the insula and hypothalamus, in terms of BOLD% signal change, relative to the global mean. These data suggest that differences are not solely driven by reduced responses to overfeeding in the RO cohort. Overfeeding in this group was associated with a trend towards increased activation of the hypothalamus (t(1,75) = 2.50, p = 0.1) (OF>EU:H>O).

Bottom Line: The objective of this study was to examine the effects of short-term overfeeding on the neuronal response to food-related visual stimuli in individuals prone and resistant to weight gain. 22 thin and 19 reduced-obese (RO) individuals were studied.In the eucaloric state, food as compared to non-food images elicited significantly greater activation of insula and inferior visual cortex in thin as compared to RO individuals.Two days of overfeeding led to significant attenuation of not only insula and visual cortex responses but also of hypothalamus response in thin as compared to RO individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Diabetes, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado, United States of America. marc.cornier@ucdenver.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: The regulation of energy intake is a complex process involving the integration of homeostatic signals and both internal and external sensory inputs. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of short-term overfeeding on the neuronal response to food-related visual stimuli in individuals prone and resistant to weight gain.

Methodology/principal findings: 22 thin and 19 reduced-obese (RO) individuals were studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed in the fasted state after two days of eucaloric energy intake and after two days of 30% overfeeding in a counterbalanced design. fMRI was performed while subjects viewed images of foods of high hedonic value and neutral non-food objects. In the eucaloric state, food as compared to non-food images elicited significantly greater activation of insula and inferior visual cortex in thin as compared to RO individuals. Two days of overfeeding led to significant attenuation of not only insula and visual cortex responses but also of hypothalamus response in thin as compared to RO individuals.

Conclusions/significance: These findings emphasize the important role of food-related visual cues in ingestive behavior and suggest that there are important phenotypic differences in the interactions between external visual sensory inputs, energy balance status, and brain regions involved in the regulation of energy intake. Furthermore, alterations in the neuronal response to food cues may relate to the propensity to gain weight.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus