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Acromegaly and gigantism in the medical literature. Case descriptions in the era before and the early years after the initial publication of Pierre Marie (1886).

de Herder WW - Pituitary (2009)

Bottom Line: Pituitary adenomas could be found in the great majority of cases.It also became clear that acromegaly and gigantism were the same disease but occurring at different stages of life and not different diseases as initially thought.The stage was set for further research into the pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of acromegaly and gigantism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Sector of Endocrinology, Erasmus MC, 3015 CE Rotterdam, The Netherlands. w.w.deherder@erasmusmc.nl

ABSTRACT
In 1886 Pierre Marie used the term "acromegaly" for the first time and gave a full description of the characteristic clinical picture. However several others had already given clear clinical descriptions before him and sometimes had given the disease other names. After 1886, it gradually became clear that pituitary enlargement (caused by a pituitary adenoma) was the cause and not the consequence of acromegaly, as initially thought. Pituitary adenomas could be found in the great majority of cases. It also became clear that acromegaly and gigantism were the same disease but occurring at different stages of life and not different diseases as initially thought. At the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century most information was derived from case descriptions and post-mortem examinations of patients with acromegaly or (famous) patients with gigantism. The stage was set for further research into the pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of acromegaly and gigantism.

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Albert Johan Kramer (1897, Amsterdam, The Netherlands). Collection W.W. de Herder
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Fig5: Albert Johan Kramer (1897, Amsterdam, The Netherlands). Collection W.W. de Herder

Mentions: The Swiss anthropologist Schlaginhaufen examined the Dutch giant Albert Johan Kramer (1897, Amsterdam, The Netherlands), also known as “Lofty” (UK) and “Jan van Albert” (USA and Europe) in July 1923 in Albisgütli (Switzerland) (Fig. 5) [61]. Kramer’s final height was 2.42 m. (8 ft.), although his maximum reported height was 2.69 m. (8 ft. 9¾ in.) [61, 62]. He weighed 165 kg (364 lbs). Schlaginhaufen was able to register 40 anthropometric data except his overall height, because of “Geschäftsgeheimnis” (professional secrecy), reported by Kramer himself as 2.54 m.(8 ft. 4 in.). He also was convinced that Kramer did not suffer from acromegaly [61, 62].Fig. 5


Acromegaly and gigantism in the medical literature. Case descriptions in the era before and the early years after the initial publication of Pierre Marie (1886).

de Herder WW - Pituitary (2009)

Albert Johan Kramer (1897, Amsterdam, The Netherlands). Collection W.W. de Herder
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2712620&req=5

Fig5: Albert Johan Kramer (1897, Amsterdam, The Netherlands). Collection W.W. de Herder
Mentions: The Swiss anthropologist Schlaginhaufen examined the Dutch giant Albert Johan Kramer (1897, Amsterdam, The Netherlands), also known as “Lofty” (UK) and “Jan van Albert” (USA and Europe) in July 1923 in Albisgütli (Switzerland) (Fig. 5) [61]. Kramer’s final height was 2.42 m. (8 ft.), although his maximum reported height was 2.69 m. (8 ft. 9¾ in.) [61, 62]. He weighed 165 kg (364 lbs). Schlaginhaufen was able to register 40 anthropometric data except his overall height, because of “Geschäftsgeheimnis” (professional secrecy), reported by Kramer himself as 2.54 m.(8 ft. 4 in.). He also was convinced that Kramer did not suffer from acromegaly [61, 62].Fig. 5

Bottom Line: Pituitary adenomas could be found in the great majority of cases.It also became clear that acromegaly and gigantism were the same disease but occurring at different stages of life and not different diseases as initially thought.The stage was set for further research into the pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of acromegaly and gigantism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Sector of Endocrinology, Erasmus MC, 3015 CE Rotterdam, The Netherlands. w.w.deherder@erasmusmc.nl

ABSTRACT
In 1886 Pierre Marie used the term "acromegaly" for the first time and gave a full description of the characteristic clinical picture. However several others had already given clear clinical descriptions before him and sometimes had given the disease other names. After 1886, it gradually became clear that pituitary enlargement (caused by a pituitary adenoma) was the cause and not the consequence of acromegaly, as initially thought. Pituitary adenomas could be found in the great majority of cases. It also became clear that acromegaly and gigantism were the same disease but occurring at different stages of life and not different diseases as initially thought. At the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century most information was derived from case descriptions and post-mortem examinations of patients with acromegaly or (famous) patients with gigantism. The stage was set for further research into the pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of acromegaly and gigantism.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus