Limits...
Acromegaly and gigantism in the medical literature. Case descriptions in the era before and the early years after the initial publication of Pierre Marie (1886).

de Herder WW - Pituitary (2009)

Bottom Line: Pituitary adenomas could be found in the great majority of cases.It also became clear that acromegaly and gigantism were the same disease but occurring at different stages of life and not different diseases as initially thought.The stage was set for further research into the pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of acromegaly and gigantism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Sector of Endocrinology, Erasmus MC, 3015 CE Rotterdam, The Netherlands. w.w.deherder@erasmusmc.nl

ABSTRACT
In 1886 Pierre Marie used the term "acromegaly" for the first time and gave a full description of the characteristic clinical picture. However several others had already given clear clinical descriptions before him and sometimes had given the disease other names. After 1886, it gradually became clear that pituitary enlargement (caused by a pituitary adenoma) was the cause and not the consequence of acromegaly, as initially thought. Pituitary adenomas could be found in the great majority of cases. It also became clear that acromegaly and gigantism were the same disease but occurring at different stages of life and not different diseases as initially thought. At the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century most information was derived from case descriptions and post-mortem examinations of patients with acromegaly or (famous) patients with gigantism. The stage was set for further research into the pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of acromegaly and gigantism.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Lewis Wilkins (1874, Minnesota (USA)—1902, Chicago, (USA)) together with Professor Rudolf Ludwig Karl Virchow (1821, Schievelbein (Preussen)—1902, Berlin (Germany) and his team in 1900 in Berlin (Germany). Collection W.W. de Herder
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2712620&req=5

Fig1: Lewis Wilkins (1874, Minnesota (USA)—1902, Chicago, (USA)) together with Professor Rudolf Ludwig Karl Virchow (1821, Schievelbein (Preussen)—1902, Berlin (Germany) and his team in 1900 in Berlin (Germany). Collection W.W. de Herder

Mentions: Lewis Wilkins (1874, Minnesota (USA)—1902, Chicago, (USA)) (Fig. 1) had a reported height which varied between 2.26 m. (7 ft. 5 in.) and 2.535 m. (8 ft. 3½ in.). An impressive feature was his asymmetrical left facial hypertrophy, which was initially diagnosed as “leontiasis ossea” [36, 48, 50]. Months before his death he first suddenly lost the vision in his left eye and suffered from excruciating headaches. Later he became blind in his right eye. He also experienced deafness in the left ear and loss of feeling on the left side of the face and the left part of his tongue. He died from ulcerative colitis accompanied by bronchopneumonia. He was autopsied by Drs. P. Bassoe, L. Loeb, and Prof. Hektoen at the Presbyterian Hospital in Chicago (USA). A sarcomatous tumor with extension in the pituitary area and diffuse left sided hyperostosis was found. The pituitary seemed normal. The thyroid was multinodular and enlarged [51, 52].Fig. 1


Acromegaly and gigantism in the medical literature. Case descriptions in the era before and the early years after the initial publication of Pierre Marie (1886).

de Herder WW - Pituitary (2009)

Lewis Wilkins (1874, Minnesota (USA)—1902, Chicago, (USA)) together with Professor Rudolf Ludwig Karl Virchow (1821, Schievelbein (Preussen)—1902, Berlin (Germany) and his team in 1900 in Berlin (Germany). Collection W.W. de Herder
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2712620&req=5

Fig1: Lewis Wilkins (1874, Minnesota (USA)—1902, Chicago, (USA)) together with Professor Rudolf Ludwig Karl Virchow (1821, Schievelbein (Preussen)—1902, Berlin (Germany) and his team in 1900 in Berlin (Germany). Collection W.W. de Herder
Mentions: Lewis Wilkins (1874, Minnesota (USA)—1902, Chicago, (USA)) (Fig. 1) had a reported height which varied between 2.26 m. (7 ft. 5 in.) and 2.535 m. (8 ft. 3½ in.). An impressive feature was his asymmetrical left facial hypertrophy, which was initially diagnosed as “leontiasis ossea” [36, 48, 50]. Months before his death he first suddenly lost the vision in his left eye and suffered from excruciating headaches. Later he became blind in his right eye. He also experienced deafness in the left ear and loss of feeling on the left side of the face and the left part of his tongue. He died from ulcerative colitis accompanied by bronchopneumonia. He was autopsied by Drs. P. Bassoe, L. Loeb, and Prof. Hektoen at the Presbyterian Hospital in Chicago (USA). A sarcomatous tumor with extension in the pituitary area and diffuse left sided hyperostosis was found. The pituitary seemed normal. The thyroid was multinodular and enlarged [51, 52].Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Pituitary adenomas could be found in the great majority of cases.It also became clear that acromegaly and gigantism were the same disease but occurring at different stages of life and not different diseases as initially thought.The stage was set for further research into the pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of acromegaly and gigantism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Sector of Endocrinology, Erasmus MC, 3015 CE Rotterdam, The Netherlands. w.w.deherder@erasmusmc.nl

ABSTRACT
In 1886 Pierre Marie used the term "acromegaly" for the first time and gave a full description of the characteristic clinical picture. However several others had already given clear clinical descriptions before him and sometimes had given the disease other names. After 1886, it gradually became clear that pituitary enlargement (caused by a pituitary adenoma) was the cause and not the consequence of acromegaly, as initially thought. Pituitary adenomas could be found in the great majority of cases. It also became clear that acromegaly and gigantism were the same disease but occurring at different stages of life and not different diseases as initially thought. At the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century most information was derived from case descriptions and post-mortem examinations of patients with acromegaly or (famous) patients with gigantism. The stage was set for further research into the pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of acromegaly and gigantism.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus