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DNA fingerprinting differentiation between beta-carotene hyperproducer strains of Dunaliella from around the world.

Olmos J, Ochoa L, Paniagua-Michel J, Contreras R - Saline Syst. (2009)

Bottom Line: In this work, we applied our intron-sizing method to compare the 18S rDNA fingerprint between D. salina (CCAP 19/18), D. salina/bardawil (UTEX LB2538) and beta-carotene hyperproducing strains of Dunaliella isolated from salt saturated lagoons in Baja, Mexico.In Baja Mexico we found D. salina and D. salina/bardawil species by using intron-sizing-method.The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Dunaliella 18S rDNA gene sequences were analyzed with our methodology and extraordinary correlation was found with experimental results.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Microbiology Laboratory, Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada (CICESE), Department of Marine Biotechnology, Ensenada, B.C, México.

ABSTRACT

Background: Dunaliella salina is the most important species of the genus for beta-carotene production. Several investigations have demonstrated that D. salina produces more than 10% dry weight of pigment and that the species grows in salt saturated lagoons. High plasticity in the green stage and the almost indistinguishable differences in the red phase make identification and differentiation of species and ecotypes very difficult and time consuming.

Results: In this work, we applied our intron-sizing method to compare the 18S rDNA fingerprint between D. salina (CCAP 19/18), D. salina/bardawil (UTEX LB2538) and beta-carotene hyperproducing strains of Dunaliella isolated from salt saturated lagoons in Baja, Mexico. All hyperproducer strains reached beta-carotene levels of about 10 pg/cell. Optical microscopy did not allow to differentiate between these Dunaliella strains; however, 18S rDNA fingerprinting methodology allowed us to differentiate D. salina from D. salina/bardawil.

Conclusion: In Baja Mexico we found D. salina and D. salina/bardawil species by using intron-sizing-method. The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Dunaliella 18S rDNA gene sequences were analyzed with our methodology and extraordinary correlation was found with experimental results.

No MeSH data available.


Sampling stations of Dunaliella species indicated by arrows in Baja California, peninsula of México. La Salina and San Quintín samples where used for this work.
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Figure 1: Sampling stations of Dunaliella species indicated by arrows in Baja California, peninsula of México. La Salina and San Quintín samples where used for this work.

Mentions: D. salina strains have been found around the world (Australia, Chile, India, Israel, México, etc), however, D. salina/bardawil classified by Dr. Ben-Amotz has not been reported from other places than Bardawil lagoon. In this work, using intron-sizing method, we demonstrated that each hyperproducer species has an exclusive 18S rDNA fingerprint profile. D. salina/bardawil species with the same 18S rDNA fingerprint and same amount of β-carotene was found in salt saturated lagoons in Baja California Mexico (Fig. 1). Non β-carotene hyperproducer species of Dunaliella were easily discriminated with our methodology, even in the green stage, avoiding long cleaning, purification and growing process. The intron-sizing method provides a novel and very powerful DNA-fingerprinting technique to accomplish a specific, rapid and sensitive identification of carotenogenic Dunaliella species. In this work we demonstrated that auxiliary methods, such as the one proposed, could be useful obtaining well characterized and certified international culture collection.


DNA fingerprinting differentiation between beta-carotene hyperproducer strains of Dunaliella from around the world.

Olmos J, Ochoa L, Paniagua-Michel J, Contreras R - Saline Syst. (2009)

Sampling stations of Dunaliella species indicated by arrows in Baja California, peninsula of México. La Salina and San Quintín samples where used for this work.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2710335&req=5

Figure 1: Sampling stations of Dunaliella species indicated by arrows in Baja California, peninsula of México. La Salina and San Quintín samples where used for this work.
Mentions: D. salina strains have been found around the world (Australia, Chile, India, Israel, México, etc), however, D. salina/bardawil classified by Dr. Ben-Amotz has not been reported from other places than Bardawil lagoon. In this work, using intron-sizing method, we demonstrated that each hyperproducer species has an exclusive 18S rDNA fingerprint profile. D. salina/bardawil species with the same 18S rDNA fingerprint and same amount of β-carotene was found in salt saturated lagoons in Baja California Mexico (Fig. 1). Non β-carotene hyperproducer species of Dunaliella were easily discriminated with our methodology, even in the green stage, avoiding long cleaning, purification and growing process. The intron-sizing method provides a novel and very powerful DNA-fingerprinting technique to accomplish a specific, rapid and sensitive identification of carotenogenic Dunaliella species. In this work we demonstrated that auxiliary methods, such as the one proposed, could be useful obtaining well characterized and certified international culture collection.

Bottom Line: In this work, we applied our intron-sizing method to compare the 18S rDNA fingerprint between D. salina (CCAP 19/18), D. salina/bardawil (UTEX LB2538) and beta-carotene hyperproducing strains of Dunaliella isolated from salt saturated lagoons in Baja, Mexico.In Baja Mexico we found D. salina and D. salina/bardawil species by using intron-sizing-method.The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Dunaliella 18S rDNA gene sequences were analyzed with our methodology and extraordinary correlation was found with experimental results.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Microbiology Laboratory, Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada (CICESE), Department of Marine Biotechnology, Ensenada, B.C, México.

ABSTRACT

Background: Dunaliella salina is the most important species of the genus for beta-carotene production. Several investigations have demonstrated that D. salina produces more than 10% dry weight of pigment and that the species grows in salt saturated lagoons. High plasticity in the green stage and the almost indistinguishable differences in the red phase make identification and differentiation of species and ecotypes very difficult and time consuming.

Results: In this work, we applied our intron-sizing method to compare the 18S rDNA fingerprint between D. salina (CCAP 19/18), D. salina/bardawil (UTEX LB2538) and beta-carotene hyperproducing strains of Dunaliella isolated from salt saturated lagoons in Baja, Mexico. All hyperproducer strains reached beta-carotene levels of about 10 pg/cell. Optical microscopy did not allow to differentiate between these Dunaliella strains; however, 18S rDNA fingerprinting methodology allowed us to differentiate D. salina from D. salina/bardawil.

Conclusion: In Baja Mexico we found D. salina and D. salina/bardawil species by using intron-sizing-method. The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Dunaliella 18S rDNA gene sequences were analyzed with our methodology and extraordinary correlation was found with experimental results.

No MeSH data available.