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A cross-sectional pilot study to determine the prevalence of testosterone deficiency syndrome in working population of Indian men.

Goel A, Kumar S, Natu SM, Dalela D, Sinha RJ, Awasthi S - Indian J Urol (2009)

Bottom Line: In 11 and 6 cases, respectively, the serum free- and total-testosterone levels were found to be low although the subjects were asymptomatic for TDS.The prevalence of symptomatic biochemical hypogonadism was 26.1%.The higher prevalence of symptoms alone of TDS was unusual.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, India.

ABSTRACT

Aim: To determine the prevalence of testosterone deficiency syndrome (TDS) in healthy Indian men employed in a hospital aged above 40 years.

Materials and methods: A general medical health check-up camp was organized for all male employees above 40 years age working in surgical departments. After clinical history and systemic inquiry, subjects were requested to fill the St. Louis University's ADAM Questionnaire based on which the total and free-serum testosterone estimation was then done.

Results: One hundred fifty seven healthy volunteers enrolled for the study (mean age 53.1 years; range 40-60). The androgen decline in the aging male (ADAM) Questionnaire detected 106 men (67.5%) to be symptomatic for TDS. Serum testosterone estimation in these subjects revealed 41/106 to have low free-serum testosterone levels and 32/106 to have low total-serum testosterone. In 11 and 6 cases, respectively, the serum free- and total-testosterone levels were found to be low although the subjects were asymptomatic for TDS.

Conclusions: The prevalence of symptomatic biochemical hypogonadism was 26.1%. The higher prevalence of symptoms alone of TDS was unusual. It could be because of the nature of the questionnaire. Free-serum testosterone may be a better single test to diagnose symptomatic hypogonadism than total-serum testosterone.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Bar diagram of serum free testosterone
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Figure 0002: Bar diagram of serum free testosterone

Mentions: Of the 180 listed male workers between ages 40 and 60 years, 170 participated in the study. Of these, 157 agreed to participate in the TDS study. The mean age was 53.1 years (n = 157; range 40–60). Twenty-three volunteers had other co-morbid conditions like diabetes (12 cases), hypertension (12 cases), and tuberculosis (1 case). None of the volunteers were on drugs that could affect the serum testosterone levels. The mean body weight was 64.3 kg (range 54–78) and the mean height was 167.4 cm (range 158–180 cm). On the basis of St. Louis Questionnaire, of the 157 subjects, 106 (67.5%) tested positive for symptoms of TDS (mean age 53.5 years; range 40–60). Of these 106 symptomatic cases, 41 and 32 subjects were found to have less than normal serum-free (mean serum-free testosterone 5.55 pg/ml; range 3.09–7.08) and total testosterone (mean serum-total testosterone 1.5 ng/ml; range 1.1–2.5) levels. The other 65 symptomatic subjects had normal total-and free-testosterone levels (mean age 51.8 years, range 40–60). Eleven asymptomatic subjects (mean age 55.1 years; range 46–60) were found to have low free-serum testosterone levels (6.4 pg/ml; range 4.1–7.4) and in 6 of these cases low total-serum testosterone was identified (mean 1.4 ng/ml; range 1.2–2.5). The risk of TDS was 70% significantly lower in the age group of 40–50 years as compared to 51–60 years (RR = 0.3, 95% CI = 0.1–0.8). The risk of TDS was 2.9 times higher in those having at least one symptom as compared to those not having any symptom (RR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.8–4.6) and this was statistically significant. The response to various questions in men with biochemically confirmed TDS in shown in Table 2. The association of different variables between andropause and non-andropause patients is shown in Table 3 and Table 4. A scatter plot for free-serum testosterone levels is shown in Figure 1 and bar diagram of serum free testosterone [Figure 2].


A cross-sectional pilot study to determine the prevalence of testosterone deficiency syndrome in working population of Indian men.

Goel A, Kumar S, Natu SM, Dalela D, Sinha RJ, Awasthi S - Indian J Urol (2009)

Bar diagram of serum free testosterone
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2710062&req=5

Figure 0002: Bar diagram of serum free testosterone
Mentions: Of the 180 listed male workers between ages 40 and 60 years, 170 participated in the study. Of these, 157 agreed to participate in the TDS study. The mean age was 53.1 years (n = 157; range 40–60). Twenty-three volunteers had other co-morbid conditions like diabetes (12 cases), hypertension (12 cases), and tuberculosis (1 case). None of the volunteers were on drugs that could affect the serum testosterone levels. The mean body weight was 64.3 kg (range 54–78) and the mean height was 167.4 cm (range 158–180 cm). On the basis of St. Louis Questionnaire, of the 157 subjects, 106 (67.5%) tested positive for symptoms of TDS (mean age 53.5 years; range 40–60). Of these 106 symptomatic cases, 41 and 32 subjects were found to have less than normal serum-free (mean serum-free testosterone 5.55 pg/ml; range 3.09–7.08) and total testosterone (mean serum-total testosterone 1.5 ng/ml; range 1.1–2.5) levels. The other 65 symptomatic subjects had normal total-and free-testosterone levels (mean age 51.8 years, range 40–60). Eleven asymptomatic subjects (mean age 55.1 years; range 46–60) were found to have low free-serum testosterone levels (6.4 pg/ml; range 4.1–7.4) and in 6 of these cases low total-serum testosterone was identified (mean 1.4 ng/ml; range 1.2–2.5). The risk of TDS was 70% significantly lower in the age group of 40–50 years as compared to 51–60 years (RR = 0.3, 95% CI = 0.1–0.8). The risk of TDS was 2.9 times higher in those having at least one symptom as compared to those not having any symptom (RR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.8–4.6) and this was statistically significant. The response to various questions in men with biochemically confirmed TDS in shown in Table 2. The association of different variables between andropause and non-andropause patients is shown in Table 3 and Table 4. A scatter plot for free-serum testosterone levels is shown in Figure 1 and bar diagram of serum free testosterone [Figure 2].

Bottom Line: In 11 and 6 cases, respectively, the serum free- and total-testosterone levels were found to be low although the subjects were asymptomatic for TDS.The prevalence of symptomatic biochemical hypogonadism was 26.1%.The higher prevalence of symptoms alone of TDS was unusual.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, India.

ABSTRACT

Aim: To determine the prevalence of testosterone deficiency syndrome (TDS) in healthy Indian men employed in a hospital aged above 40 years.

Materials and methods: A general medical health check-up camp was organized for all male employees above 40 years age working in surgical departments. After clinical history and systemic inquiry, subjects were requested to fill the St. Louis University's ADAM Questionnaire based on which the total and free-serum testosterone estimation was then done.

Results: One hundred fifty seven healthy volunteers enrolled for the study (mean age 53.1 years; range 40-60). The androgen decline in the aging male (ADAM) Questionnaire detected 106 men (67.5%) to be symptomatic for TDS. Serum testosterone estimation in these subjects revealed 41/106 to have low free-serum testosterone levels and 32/106 to have low total-serum testosterone. In 11 and 6 cases, respectively, the serum free- and total-testosterone levels were found to be low although the subjects were asymptomatic for TDS.

Conclusions: The prevalence of symptomatic biochemical hypogonadism was 26.1%. The higher prevalence of symptoms alone of TDS was unusual. It could be because of the nature of the questionnaire. Free-serum testosterone may be a better single test to diagnose symptomatic hypogonadism than total-serum testosterone.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus