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The A's, G's, C's, and T's of health disparities.

Ramos E, Rotimi C - BMC Med Genomics (2009)

Bottom Line: In order to eliminate health disparities in the United States, more efforts are needed to address the breadth of social issues directly contributing to the healthy divide observed across racial and ethnic groups.Socioeconomic status, education, and the environment are intimately linked to health outcomes.However, with the tremendous advances in technology and increased investigation into human genetic variation, genomics is poised to play a valuable role in bolstering efforts to find new treatments and preventions for chronic conditions and diseases that disparately affect certain ethnic groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Research on Genomics and Global Health, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 12 South Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892-5635, USA. ramose@mail.nih.gov

ABSTRACT
In order to eliminate health disparities in the United States, more efforts are needed to address the breadth of social issues directly contributing to the healthy divide observed across racial and ethnic groups. Socioeconomic status, education, and the environment are intimately linked to health outcomes. However, with the tremendous advances in technology and increased investigation into human genetic variation, genomics is poised to play a valuable role in bolstering efforts to find new treatments and preventions for chronic conditions and diseases that disparately affect certain ethnic groups. Promising studies focused on understanding the genetic underpinnings of diseases such as prostate cancer or beta-blocker treatments for heart failure are illustrative of the positive contribution that genomics can have on improving minority health.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Death rates of selected ethnicities for six causes of death in the United States. Rates are per 100,000 population and age-adjusted to the 2000 census. AI = American Indian, AN = Alaska Native, PI = Pacific Islander. Source: Health, United States, 2007.
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Figure 1: Death rates of selected ethnicities for six causes of death in the United States. Rates are per 100,000 population and age-adjusted to the 2000 census. AI = American Indian, AN = Alaska Native, PI = Pacific Islander. Source: Health, United States, 2007.

Mentions: Disparities or inequities in health refer to socio-demographic group differences in the distribution of disease, health outcomes, or access to health care. In the United States, there is overwhelming evidence for the existence of disparities in health when ethnic minority groups (as defined by the Office of Management and Budget [1] but referred to here as ethnicities [2]) are compared to their white counterparts[3] (Figure 1). A number of factors play a significant role in varying health outcomes, which include, but are not limited to, socio-political structure, discrimination, cultural practices (e.g., diet), socioeconomic status, exposure to harmful toxins in the environment, and access to health care.


The A's, G's, C's, and T's of health disparities.

Ramos E, Rotimi C - BMC Med Genomics (2009)

Death rates of selected ethnicities for six causes of death in the United States. Rates are per 100,000 population and age-adjusted to the 2000 census. AI = American Indian, AN = Alaska Native, PI = Pacific Islander. Source: Health, United States, 2007.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2698907&req=5

Figure 1: Death rates of selected ethnicities for six causes of death in the United States. Rates are per 100,000 population and age-adjusted to the 2000 census. AI = American Indian, AN = Alaska Native, PI = Pacific Islander. Source: Health, United States, 2007.
Mentions: Disparities or inequities in health refer to socio-demographic group differences in the distribution of disease, health outcomes, or access to health care. In the United States, there is overwhelming evidence for the existence of disparities in health when ethnic minority groups (as defined by the Office of Management and Budget [1] but referred to here as ethnicities [2]) are compared to their white counterparts[3] (Figure 1). A number of factors play a significant role in varying health outcomes, which include, but are not limited to, socio-political structure, discrimination, cultural practices (e.g., diet), socioeconomic status, exposure to harmful toxins in the environment, and access to health care.

Bottom Line: In order to eliminate health disparities in the United States, more efforts are needed to address the breadth of social issues directly contributing to the healthy divide observed across racial and ethnic groups.Socioeconomic status, education, and the environment are intimately linked to health outcomes.However, with the tremendous advances in technology and increased investigation into human genetic variation, genomics is poised to play a valuable role in bolstering efforts to find new treatments and preventions for chronic conditions and diseases that disparately affect certain ethnic groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Research on Genomics and Global Health, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 12 South Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892-5635, USA. ramose@mail.nih.gov

ABSTRACT
In order to eliminate health disparities in the United States, more efforts are needed to address the breadth of social issues directly contributing to the healthy divide observed across racial and ethnic groups. Socioeconomic status, education, and the environment are intimately linked to health outcomes. However, with the tremendous advances in technology and increased investigation into human genetic variation, genomics is poised to play a valuable role in bolstering efforts to find new treatments and preventions for chronic conditions and diseases that disparately affect certain ethnic groups. Promising studies focused on understanding the genetic underpinnings of diseases such as prostate cancer or beta-blocker treatments for heart failure are illustrative of the positive contribution that genomics can have on improving minority health.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus