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No detectable maternal effects of elevated CO(2) on Arabidopsis thaliana over 15 generations.

Teng N, Jin B, Wang Q, Hao H, Ceulemans R, Kuang T, Lin J - PLoS ONE (2009)

Bottom Line: We found that within an individual generation, elevated CO(2) significantly advanced plant flowering, increased photosynthetic rate, increased the size and number of starch grains per chloroplast, reduced stomatal density, stomatal conductance, and transpiration rate, and resulted in a higher reproductive mass.In addition, a reciprocal sowing experiment demonstrated that elevated CO(2) did not produce detectable maternal effects on the offspring after fifteen generations.Taken together, these results suggested that the maternal effects of elevated CO(2) failed to extend to the offspring due to the potential lack of genetic variation for CO(2) responsiveness, and future plants may not evolve specific adaptations to elevated CO(2) concentrations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Photosynthesis and Environmental Molecular Physiology, Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Maternal environment has been demonstrated to produce considerable impact on offspring growth. However, few studies have been carried out to investigate multi-generational maternal effects of elevated CO(2) on plant growth and development. Here we present the first report on the responses of plant reproductive, photosynthetic, and cellular characteristics to elevated CO(2) over 15 generations using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system. We found that within an individual generation, elevated CO(2) significantly advanced plant flowering, increased photosynthetic rate, increased the size and number of starch grains per chloroplast, reduced stomatal density, stomatal conductance, and transpiration rate, and resulted in a higher reproductive mass. Elevated CO(2) did not significantly influence silique length and number of seeds per silique. Across 15 generations grown at elevated CO(2) concentrations, however, there were no significant differences in these traits. In addition, a reciprocal sowing experiment demonstrated that elevated CO(2) did not produce detectable maternal effects on the offspring after fifteen generations. Taken together, these results suggested that the maternal effects of elevated CO(2) failed to extend to the offspring due to the potential lack of genetic variation for CO(2) responsiveness, and future plants may not evolve specific adaptations to elevated CO(2) concentrations.

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Effects of elevated CO2 on the flowering time of Arabidopsis thaliana over 15 generations.A, On average, plants grown in elevated CO2 flowered significantly earlier than those grown in ambient CO2 concentrations within each generation. B, The number of flowering plants per day was recorded in ambient and elevated CO2 across 15 generations. Error bars represent the standard deviation of the mean.
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pone-0006035-g001: Effects of elevated CO2 on the flowering time of Arabidopsis thaliana over 15 generations.A, On average, plants grown in elevated CO2 flowered significantly earlier than those grown in ambient CO2 concentrations within each generation. B, The number of flowering plants per day was recorded in ambient and elevated CO2 across 15 generations. Error bars represent the standard deviation of the mean.

Mentions: The date of opening of the first flower was significantly affected by the CO2 treatment (Figure 1). On average, plants grown at elevated CO2 concentrations flowered about three days earlier than those grown at ambient CO2 concentrations in each generation. However, within the same CO2 treatment, the average number of days to first flowering in any two generations was similar, and no significant difference was observed in flowering time among the 15 generations. For example, the average number of days to first flowering in any generation averaged around 40.5 for the populations at elevated CO2 and 44 for those at ambient CO2. Taken together, within an individual generation, CO2 treatment resulted in a significant change in flowering time, whereas no significant changes in flowering time were detected among generations within the same CO2 treatment.


No detectable maternal effects of elevated CO(2) on Arabidopsis thaliana over 15 generations.

Teng N, Jin B, Wang Q, Hao H, Ceulemans R, Kuang T, Lin J - PLoS ONE (2009)

Effects of elevated CO2 on the flowering time of Arabidopsis thaliana over 15 generations.A, On average, plants grown in elevated CO2 flowered significantly earlier than those grown in ambient CO2 concentrations within each generation. B, The number of flowering plants per day was recorded in ambient and elevated CO2 across 15 generations. Error bars represent the standard deviation of the mean.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2698214&req=5

pone-0006035-g001: Effects of elevated CO2 on the flowering time of Arabidopsis thaliana over 15 generations.A, On average, plants grown in elevated CO2 flowered significantly earlier than those grown in ambient CO2 concentrations within each generation. B, The number of flowering plants per day was recorded in ambient and elevated CO2 across 15 generations. Error bars represent the standard deviation of the mean.
Mentions: The date of opening of the first flower was significantly affected by the CO2 treatment (Figure 1). On average, plants grown at elevated CO2 concentrations flowered about three days earlier than those grown at ambient CO2 concentrations in each generation. However, within the same CO2 treatment, the average number of days to first flowering in any two generations was similar, and no significant difference was observed in flowering time among the 15 generations. For example, the average number of days to first flowering in any generation averaged around 40.5 for the populations at elevated CO2 and 44 for those at ambient CO2. Taken together, within an individual generation, CO2 treatment resulted in a significant change in flowering time, whereas no significant changes in flowering time were detected among generations within the same CO2 treatment.

Bottom Line: We found that within an individual generation, elevated CO(2) significantly advanced plant flowering, increased photosynthetic rate, increased the size and number of starch grains per chloroplast, reduced stomatal density, stomatal conductance, and transpiration rate, and resulted in a higher reproductive mass.In addition, a reciprocal sowing experiment demonstrated that elevated CO(2) did not produce detectable maternal effects on the offspring after fifteen generations.Taken together, these results suggested that the maternal effects of elevated CO(2) failed to extend to the offspring due to the potential lack of genetic variation for CO(2) responsiveness, and future plants may not evolve specific adaptations to elevated CO(2) concentrations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Photosynthesis and Environmental Molecular Physiology, Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Maternal environment has been demonstrated to produce considerable impact on offspring growth. However, few studies have been carried out to investigate multi-generational maternal effects of elevated CO(2) on plant growth and development. Here we present the first report on the responses of plant reproductive, photosynthetic, and cellular characteristics to elevated CO(2) over 15 generations using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system. We found that within an individual generation, elevated CO(2) significantly advanced plant flowering, increased photosynthetic rate, increased the size and number of starch grains per chloroplast, reduced stomatal density, stomatal conductance, and transpiration rate, and resulted in a higher reproductive mass. Elevated CO(2) did not significantly influence silique length and number of seeds per silique. Across 15 generations grown at elevated CO(2) concentrations, however, there were no significant differences in these traits. In addition, a reciprocal sowing experiment demonstrated that elevated CO(2) did not produce detectable maternal effects on the offspring after fifteen generations. Taken together, these results suggested that the maternal effects of elevated CO(2) failed to extend to the offspring due to the potential lack of genetic variation for CO(2) responsiveness, and future plants may not evolve specific adaptations to elevated CO(2) concentrations.

Show MeSH