Limits...
Pure basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix: a case report.

Kwon YS, Kim YM, Choi GW, Kim YT, Nam JH - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2009)

Bottom Line: A radical hysterectomy was performed, along with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, pelvic lymph node dissection, and para-aortic lymph node sampling.Follow-up for the patient is ongoing.These data would be useful for defining the best diagnosis and treatment for these rare tumors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix is an extremely rare malignancy of the female genital tract with a poorer clinical outcome than squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. We report a case of pure basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. A 70-yr-old woman with vaginal bleeding was referred to our institute. A basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix, of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage Ib1, was diagnosed by a loop electrosurgical excision procedure cone biopsy. A radical hysterectomy was performed, along with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, pelvic lymph node dissection, and para-aortic lymph node sampling. Pathologic findings were consistent with a basaloid squamous cell carcinoma confined to the cervix without an extracervical tumor. No further treatment was administered and there was no clinical evidence of recurrence during the 12 months of follow-up. Follow-up for the patient is ongoing. Although basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix is thought to behave aggressively, accumulation of data on these rare tumors is necessary to determine whether their behavior differs significantly from that of conventional cervical squamous cell carcinoma of similar clinical stage. These data would be useful for defining the best diagnosis and treatment for these rare tumors.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

MRI findings in this patient. (A) T2 weighted image (B) T2 weighted image using an endorectal coil. The white arrow indicates a 2.0×1.6 cm cervical mass, comparable with cervical cancer.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2698210&req=5

Figure 1: MRI findings in this patient. (A) T2 weighted image (B) T2 weighted image using an endorectal coil. The white arrow indicates a 2.0×1.6 cm cervical mass, comparable with cervical cancer.

Mentions: A 70-yr-old woman, gravida 8 para 3, was referred to a tertiary medical center from a local hospital for vaginal bleeding of 3 weeks' duration. She had undergone a punch biopsy at the local hospital, which resulted in a preliminary diagnosis of adenoid cystic carcinoma or carcinoid tumor. Her medical history included diabetes mellitus (DM) for 10 yr which had been controlled by medication; in addition, her mother died of uterine cervical cancer. Physical examination showed uterine cervical erosion. The biopsy specimen taken at the local hospital showed pathologic evidence of a high grade malignant epithelial tumor, with features unusual for a cervical tumor. She therefore underwent a loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) cone biopsy, which revealed a basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. A colonoscopy, intravenous pyelogram, and cystoscopy showed no evidence of metastatic disease. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a 2 cm sized cancerous mass confined to the cervix, with no evidence of invasion of the vagina or fornix and no evidence of pelvic lymphadenopathy (Fig. 1). The tumor was classified as clinical stage Ib1. A radical hysterectomy was performed, along with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, pelvic lymph node dissection, and paraaortic lymph node sampling. The pathologic diagnosis was basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. The depth of invasion was 5/7 mm full thickness of the cervical wall. There was no evidence of tumor in sections taken from 26 lymph nodes. The resection margin of the vaginal cuff was clear. No adjuvant treatment was administered, and the patient was discharged. In the 12 months since discharge, she has shown no evidence of recurrent or metastatic disease. Follow-up is ongoing at Asan Medical Center.


Pure basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix: a case report.

Kwon YS, Kim YM, Choi GW, Kim YT, Nam JH - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2009)

MRI findings in this patient. (A) T2 weighted image (B) T2 weighted image using an endorectal coil. The white arrow indicates a 2.0×1.6 cm cervical mass, comparable with cervical cancer.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2698210&req=5

Figure 1: MRI findings in this patient. (A) T2 weighted image (B) T2 weighted image using an endorectal coil. The white arrow indicates a 2.0×1.6 cm cervical mass, comparable with cervical cancer.
Mentions: A 70-yr-old woman, gravida 8 para 3, was referred to a tertiary medical center from a local hospital for vaginal bleeding of 3 weeks' duration. She had undergone a punch biopsy at the local hospital, which resulted in a preliminary diagnosis of adenoid cystic carcinoma or carcinoid tumor. Her medical history included diabetes mellitus (DM) for 10 yr which had been controlled by medication; in addition, her mother died of uterine cervical cancer. Physical examination showed uterine cervical erosion. The biopsy specimen taken at the local hospital showed pathologic evidence of a high grade malignant epithelial tumor, with features unusual for a cervical tumor. She therefore underwent a loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) cone biopsy, which revealed a basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. A colonoscopy, intravenous pyelogram, and cystoscopy showed no evidence of metastatic disease. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a 2 cm sized cancerous mass confined to the cervix, with no evidence of invasion of the vagina or fornix and no evidence of pelvic lymphadenopathy (Fig. 1). The tumor was classified as clinical stage Ib1. A radical hysterectomy was performed, along with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, pelvic lymph node dissection, and paraaortic lymph node sampling. The pathologic diagnosis was basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. The depth of invasion was 5/7 mm full thickness of the cervical wall. There was no evidence of tumor in sections taken from 26 lymph nodes. The resection margin of the vaginal cuff was clear. No adjuvant treatment was administered, and the patient was discharged. In the 12 months since discharge, she has shown no evidence of recurrent or metastatic disease. Follow-up is ongoing at Asan Medical Center.

Bottom Line: A radical hysterectomy was performed, along with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, pelvic lymph node dissection, and para-aortic lymph node sampling.Follow-up for the patient is ongoing.These data would be useful for defining the best diagnosis and treatment for these rare tumors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix is an extremely rare malignancy of the female genital tract with a poorer clinical outcome than squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. We report a case of pure basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. A 70-yr-old woman with vaginal bleeding was referred to our institute. A basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix, of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage Ib1, was diagnosed by a loop electrosurgical excision procedure cone biopsy. A radical hysterectomy was performed, along with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, pelvic lymph node dissection, and para-aortic lymph node sampling. Pathologic findings were consistent with a basaloid squamous cell carcinoma confined to the cervix without an extracervical tumor. No further treatment was administered and there was no clinical evidence of recurrence during the 12 months of follow-up. Follow-up for the patient is ongoing. Although basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix is thought to behave aggressively, accumulation of data on these rare tumors is necessary to determine whether their behavior differs significantly from that of conventional cervical squamous cell carcinoma of similar clinical stage. These data would be useful for defining the best diagnosis and treatment for these rare tumors.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus