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Serum and pleural fluid procalcitonin in predicting bacterial infection in patients with parapneumonic effusion.

Ko YC, Wu WP, Hsu CS, Dai MP, Ou CC, Kao CH - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2009)

Bottom Line: Forty-one consecutive PPE patients were enrolled and were divided into bacterial and non-bacterial PPE.PCT of pleural fluid was significantly increased in the bacterial PPE group (0.24 ng/mL) compared to the non-bacterial PPE group (0.09 ng/mL), but there was no significant difference for serum PCT.A PCT concentration of pleural fluid >0.174 ng/mL (best cut-off value) was considered positive for a diagnosis of bacterial PPE (sensitivity, 80%; specificity, 76%; AUC, 0.84).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, St. Martin De Porres Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
This study evaluated the value of procalcitonin (PCT) levels in pleural effusion to differentiate the etiology of parapneumonic effusion (PPE). Forty-one consecutive PPE patients were enrolled and were divided into bacterial and non-bacterial PPE. Blood and pleural effusion samples were collected for PCT measurement on admission and analyzed for diagnostic evaluation. PCT of pleural fluid was significantly increased in the bacterial PPE group (0.24 ng/mL) compared to the non-bacterial PPE group (0.09 ng/mL), but there was no significant difference for serum PCT. A PCT concentration of pleural fluid >0.174 ng/mL (best cut-off value) was considered positive for a diagnosis of bacterial PPE (sensitivity, 80%; specificity, 76%; AUC, 0.84). Pleural effusion PCT in the bacterial PPE is significantly different from those of the non-bacterial PPE and control groups, so the diagnostic use of PCT still warrants further investigation.

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Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of pleural concentrations of procalcitonin and diagnosis of bacterial parapneumonic effusion.
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Figure 2: Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of pleural concentrations of procalcitonin and diagnosis of bacterial parapneumonic effusion.

Mentions: The cut-off value of pleural fluid PCT for diagnosis of bacterial PPE (from the ROC curve; AUC=0.84) was 0.17 ng/mL (Fig. 2). This corresponded to 80% sensitivity and 76% specificity, in contrast to 72% sensitivity and 94% specificity with a well-known serum cut-off value (0.5 ng/mL) for bacterial infection (Table 3) (13).


Serum and pleural fluid procalcitonin in predicting bacterial infection in patients with parapneumonic effusion.

Ko YC, Wu WP, Hsu CS, Dai MP, Ou CC, Kao CH - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2009)

Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of pleural concentrations of procalcitonin and diagnosis of bacterial parapneumonic effusion.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2698183&req=5

Figure 2: Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of pleural concentrations of procalcitonin and diagnosis of bacterial parapneumonic effusion.
Mentions: The cut-off value of pleural fluid PCT for diagnosis of bacterial PPE (from the ROC curve; AUC=0.84) was 0.17 ng/mL (Fig. 2). This corresponded to 80% sensitivity and 76% specificity, in contrast to 72% sensitivity and 94% specificity with a well-known serum cut-off value (0.5 ng/mL) for bacterial infection (Table 3) (13).

Bottom Line: Forty-one consecutive PPE patients were enrolled and were divided into bacterial and non-bacterial PPE.PCT of pleural fluid was significantly increased in the bacterial PPE group (0.24 ng/mL) compared to the non-bacterial PPE group (0.09 ng/mL), but there was no significant difference for serum PCT.A PCT concentration of pleural fluid >0.174 ng/mL (best cut-off value) was considered positive for a diagnosis of bacterial PPE (sensitivity, 80%; specificity, 76%; AUC, 0.84).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, St. Martin De Porres Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
This study evaluated the value of procalcitonin (PCT) levels in pleural effusion to differentiate the etiology of parapneumonic effusion (PPE). Forty-one consecutive PPE patients were enrolled and were divided into bacterial and non-bacterial PPE. Blood and pleural effusion samples were collected for PCT measurement on admission and analyzed for diagnostic evaluation. PCT of pleural fluid was significantly increased in the bacterial PPE group (0.24 ng/mL) compared to the non-bacterial PPE group (0.09 ng/mL), but there was no significant difference for serum PCT. A PCT concentration of pleural fluid >0.174 ng/mL (best cut-off value) was considered positive for a diagnosis of bacterial PPE (sensitivity, 80%; specificity, 76%; AUC, 0.84). Pleural effusion PCT in the bacterial PPE is significantly different from those of the non-bacterial PPE and control groups, so the diagnostic use of PCT still warrants further investigation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus