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Fixation methods for implantable port chamber: comparative study using glue, self-stabilizing leg and suture fixations in rabbits.

Na HI, Shim HJ, Kwak BK, Kim HJ, Lee YC - Korean J Radiol (2004 Oct-Dec)

Bottom Line: Twelve healthy rabbits were selected and three different methods of implanting the port chamber were employed on the back of each rabbit.A large amount of granulation tissue reaction was found at the bottom of the chamber (p = 0.0025).The fixation with the self-stabilizing leg showed relatively lower fixation strength (p = 0.0043), but no turning-over of the chamber occurred.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the fixation strength and tissue reaction of the glue fixation and self-stabilizing leg fixation methods and to compare the results with those of the conventional tagging suture fixation method.

Materials and methods: Twelve healthy rabbits were selected and three different methods of implanting the port chamber were employed on the back of each rabbit. A total of thirty six port chambers were implanted with these three different methods, viz. the glue fixation method using tissue adhesive, the self-stabilizing leg method using a self-expandable stabilizing leg, and the suture fixation method. The fixation strength and the gross and histopathologic changes of each fixation method were evaluated at three days, one week, two weeks and four weeks after port implantation.

Results: The glue fixation method showed a good fixation strength, which was similar to that of the tagging suture method (p = 0.3486). Five of the six ports (83%) implanted with the glue fixation method which were examined after two weeks showed cracks on the external surface, but this had no adverse effects on their function. A large amount of granulation tissue reaction was found at the bottom of the chamber (p = 0.0025). The fixation with the self-stabilizing leg showed relatively lower fixation strength (p = 0.0043), but no turning-over of the chamber occurred. The fixation strength improved with time after the first week, and minimal granulation tissue reaction was observed with this method.

Conclusion: The glue fixation method exhibited equal fixation strength compared to the suture fixation, but showed cracking and a large amount of granulation tissue, whereas the fixation with a self-stabilizing leg showed weaker fixation strength.

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Simple radiogram of a ports-implanted rabbit in the prone position. The scattered whitish dots (arrowheads) around the port chamber indicate the presence of lipiodolized glue. The self-stabilizing leg (arrow) port can be seen in the right upper quadrant and the conventional tagging sutured port chamber can be seen in the right lower quadrant.
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Figure 2: Simple radiogram of a ports-implanted rabbit in the prone position. The scattered whitish dots (arrowheads) around the port chamber indicate the presence of lipiodolized glue. The self-stabilizing leg (arrow) port can be seen in the right upper quadrant and the conventional tagging sutured port chamber can be seen in the right lower quadrant.

Mentions: In the left lower quadrant of the rabbits' back, an approximately 3 cm long horizontal skin incision, which is longer than that used in the above two methods, was performed, and then subcutaneous dissection was performed from the upper area of the incision. The dissection was large enough to allow for stitch ligation through a fixating hole on the bottom surface of the chamber within the subcutaneous pocket. The port chamber was fixated more than 1 cm apart from the incised area on the skin, and then the subcutaneous tissue and skin were sutured. To confirm the position and shape of each port, a plain radiograph was taken (Fig. 2).


Fixation methods for implantable port chamber: comparative study using glue, self-stabilizing leg and suture fixations in rabbits.

Na HI, Shim HJ, Kwak BK, Kim HJ, Lee YC - Korean J Radiol (2004 Oct-Dec)

Simple radiogram of a ports-implanted rabbit in the prone position. The scattered whitish dots (arrowheads) around the port chamber indicate the presence of lipiodolized glue. The self-stabilizing leg (arrow) port can be seen in the right upper quadrant and the conventional tagging sutured port chamber can be seen in the right lower quadrant.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2698171&req=5

Figure 2: Simple radiogram of a ports-implanted rabbit in the prone position. The scattered whitish dots (arrowheads) around the port chamber indicate the presence of lipiodolized glue. The self-stabilizing leg (arrow) port can be seen in the right upper quadrant and the conventional tagging sutured port chamber can be seen in the right lower quadrant.
Mentions: In the left lower quadrant of the rabbits' back, an approximately 3 cm long horizontal skin incision, which is longer than that used in the above two methods, was performed, and then subcutaneous dissection was performed from the upper area of the incision. The dissection was large enough to allow for stitch ligation through a fixating hole on the bottom surface of the chamber within the subcutaneous pocket. The port chamber was fixated more than 1 cm apart from the incised area on the skin, and then the subcutaneous tissue and skin were sutured. To confirm the position and shape of each port, a plain radiograph was taken (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Twelve healthy rabbits were selected and three different methods of implanting the port chamber were employed on the back of each rabbit.A large amount of granulation tissue reaction was found at the bottom of the chamber (p = 0.0025).The fixation with the self-stabilizing leg showed relatively lower fixation strength (p = 0.0043), but no turning-over of the chamber occurred.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the fixation strength and tissue reaction of the glue fixation and self-stabilizing leg fixation methods and to compare the results with those of the conventional tagging suture fixation method.

Materials and methods: Twelve healthy rabbits were selected and three different methods of implanting the port chamber were employed on the back of each rabbit. A total of thirty six port chambers were implanted with these three different methods, viz. the glue fixation method using tissue adhesive, the self-stabilizing leg method using a self-expandable stabilizing leg, and the suture fixation method. The fixation strength and the gross and histopathologic changes of each fixation method were evaluated at three days, one week, two weeks and four weeks after port implantation.

Results: The glue fixation method showed a good fixation strength, which was similar to that of the tagging suture method (p = 0.3486). Five of the six ports (83%) implanted with the glue fixation method which were examined after two weeks showed cracks on the external surface, but this had no adverse effects on their function. A large amount of granulation tissue reaction was found at the bottom of the chamber (p = 0.0025). The fixation with the self-stabilizing leg showed relatively lower fixation strength (p = 0.0043), but no turning-over of the chamber occurred. The fixation strength improved with time after the first week, and minimal granulation tissue reaction was observed with this method.

Conclusion: The glue fixation method exhibited equal fixation strength compared to the suture fixation, but showed cracking and a large amount of granulation tissue, whereas the fixation with a self-stabilizing leg showed weaker fixation strength.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus