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Quantification of food intake in Drosophila.

Wong R, Piper MD, Wertheim B, Partridge L - PLoS ONE (2009)

Bottom Line: We used the method to demonstrate that (a) female flies feed more frequently than males, (b) flies feed more often when housed in larger groups and (c) fly feeding varies at different times of the day.We also show that alterations in food intake are not induced by dietary restriction or by a mutation of the fly insulin receptor substrate chico.In contrast, mutation of takeout increases food intake by increasing feeding frequency while mutation of ovo(D) increases food intake by increasing the volume of food consumed per proboscis-extension.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Healthy Ageing, and GEE, University College London, London, UK.

ABSTRACT
Measurement of food intake in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is often necessary for studies of behaviour, nutrition and drug administration. There is no reliable and agreed method for measuring food intake of flies in undisturbed, steady state, and normal culture conditions. We report such a method, based on measurement of feeding frequency by proboscis-extension, validated by short-term measurements of food dye intake. We used the method to demonstrate that (a) female flies feed more frequently than males, (b) flies feed more often when housed in larger groups and (c) fly feeding varies at different times of the day. We also show that alterations in food intake are not induced by dietary restriction or by a mutation of the fly insulin receptor substrate chico. In contrast, mutation of takeout increases food intake by increasing feeding frequency while mutation of ovo(D) increases food intake by increasing the volume of food consumed per proboscis-extension. This approach provides a practical and reliable method for quantification of food intake in Drosophila under normal, undisturbed culture conditions.

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The proportion of time spent feeding for DR (open circles) and full fed (FF) flies (closed circles) on different days of their lifespan.Survivorship curves are indicated with a solid grey line (DR) and a solid black line (FF) flies. Median lifespan: DR = 70 days, FF = 65 days. Proboscis-extension assays used 150 flies (30 vials) per condition. Flies were maintained in populations that began with 1500 individuals per condition (error bars = S.D.).
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pone-0006063-g004: The proportion of time spent feeding for DR (open circles) and full fed (FF) flies (closed circles) on different days of their lifespan.Survivorship curves are indicated with a solid grey line (DR) and a solid black line (FF) flies. Median lifespan: DR = 70 days, FF = 65 days. Proboscis-extension assays used 150 flies (30 vials) per condition. Flies were maintained in populations that began with 1500 individuals per condition (error bars = S.D.).

Mentions: We therefore compared the feeding frequency of once-mated females subjected to DR or control feeding over the course of their lifespan (Figure 4). We performed the proboscis-extension assay on cohorts of flies that were kept in a pooled population and assays were performed independently over their lifespan. Feeding declined markedly with the age of the flies, especially during the first 3 weeks of life. The changes in feeding frequency across the lifetime of the flies were significantly different on the two diets (significant interaction between Age and Diet, P<0.001, GLM). No overall difference was found in average feeding frequency (0.17 in both cohorts) for the course of the lifespan. However, flies on a DR diet fed in a greater proportion of observations than full fed flies early in life, while this reversed later in life when full fed flies fed more than DR flies (between day 31 and day 50), after which the feeding became similar on the two diets. Preliminary studies showed that the feeding frequency of flies on both diets were low at the beginning of the proboscis-extension assay but gradually increased to a steady state over 30 minutes (Figure 5).


Quantification of food intake in Drosophila.

Wong R, Piper MD, Wertheim B, Partridge L - PLoS ONE (2009)

The proportion of time spent feeding for DR (open circles) and full fed (FF) flies (closed circles) on different days of their lifespan.Survivorship curves are indicated with a solid grey line (DR) and a solid black line (FF) flies. Median lifespan: DR = 70 days, FF = 65 days. Proboscis-extension assays used 150 flies (30 vials) per condition. Flies were maintained in populations that began with 1500 individuals per condition (error bars = S.D.).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2698149&req=5

pone-0006063-g004: The proportion of time spent feeding for DR (open circles) and full fed (FF) flies (closed circles) on different days of their lifespan.Survivorship curves are indicated with a solid grey line (DR) and a solid black line (FF) flies. Median lifespan: DR = 70 days, FF = 65 days. Proboscis-extension assays used 150 flies (30 vials) per condition. Flies were maintained in populations that began with 1500 individuals per condition (error bars = S.D.).
Mentions: We therefore compared the feeding frequency of once-mated females subjected to DR or control feeding over the course of their lifespan (Figure 4). We performed the proboscis-extension assay on cohorts of flies that were kept in a pooled population and assays were performed independently over their lifespan. Feeding declined markedly with the age of the flies, especially during the first 3 weeks of life. The changes in feeding frequency across the lifetime of the flies were significantly different on the two diets (significant interaction between Age and Diet, P<0.001, GLM). No overall difference was found in average feeding frequency (0.17 in both cohorts) for the course of the lifespan. However, flies on a DR diet fed in a greater proportion of observations than full fed flies early in life, while this reversed later in life when full fed flies fed more than DR flies (between day 31 and day 50), after which the feeding became similar on the two diets. Preliminary studies showed that the feeding frequency of flies on both diets were low at the beginning of the proboscis-extension assay but gradually increased to a steady state over 30 minutes (Figure 5).

Bottom Line: We used the method to demonstrate that (a) female flies feed more frequently than males, (b) flies feed more often when housed in larger groups and (c) fly feeding varies at different times of the day.We also show that alterations in food intake are not induced by dietary restriction or by a mutation of the fly insulin receptor substrate chico.In contrast, mutation of takeout increases food intake by increasing feeding frequency while mutation of ovo(D) increases food intake by increasing the volume of food consumed per proboscis-extension.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Healthy Ageing, and GEE, University College London, London, UK.

ABSTRACT
Measurement of food intake in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is often necessary for studies of behaviour, nutrition and drug administration. There is no reliable and agreed method for measuring food intake of flies in undisturbed, steady state, and normal culture conditions. We report such a method, based on measurement of feeding frequency by proboscis-extension, validated by short-term measurements of food dye intake. We used the method to demonstrate that (a) female flies feed more frequently than males, (b) flies feed more often when housed in larger groups and (c) fly feeding varies at different times of the day. We also show that alterations in food intake are not induced by dietary restriction or by a mutation of the fly insulin receptor substrate chico. In contrast, mutation of takeout increases food intake by increasing feeding frequency while mutation of ovo(D) increases food intake by increasing the volume of food consumed per proboscis-extension. This approach provides a practical and reliable method for quantification of food intake in Drosophila under normal, undisturbed culture conditions.

Show MeSH