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Functional neuroanatomy in depressed patients with sexual dysfunction: blood oxygenation level dependent functional MR imaging.

Yang JC - Korean J Radiol (2004 Apr-Jun)

Bottom Line: There was a significant difference of brain activation between two groups during visual sexual stimulation.In depressed subjects, the level of activation during the visually evoked sexual arousal was significantly less than that of healthy volunteers, especially in the cerebrocortical areas of the hypothalamus, thalamus, caudate nucleus, and inferior and superior temporal gyri.On the other hand, the cerebral activation patterns during the neutral condition in both groups showed no significant differences (p < 0.01).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Chonnam National University Hospital, Kwangju, Korea. jcyang@chonnam.ac.kr

ABSTRACT

Objective: To demonstrate the functional neuroanatomy associated with sexual arousal visually evoked in depressed males who have underlying sexual dysfunction using Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent-based fMRI.

Materials and methods: Ten healthy volunteers (age range 21-55: mean 32.5 years), and 10 depressed subjects (age range 23-51: mean 34.4 years, mean Beck Depression Inventory score of 39.6+/-5.9, mean Hamilton Rating Scale Depression (HAMD)-17 score of 33.5+/-6.0) with sexual arousal dysfunction viewed erotic and neutral video films during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with 1.5 T MR scanner (GE Signa Horizon). The fMRI data were obtained from 7 oblique planes using gradient-echo EPI (flip angle/TR/TE= 90 degrees /6000 ms/50 ms). The visual stimulation paradigm began with 60 sec of black screen, 150 sec of neutral stimulation with a documentary video film, 30 sec of black screen, 150 sec of sexual stimulation with an erotic video film followed by 30 sec of black screen. The brain activation maps and their quantification were analyzed by SPM99 program.

Results: There was a significant difference of brain activation between two groups during visual sexual stimulation. In depressed subjects, the level of activation during the visually evoked sexual arousal was significantly less than that of healthy volunteers, especially in the cerebrocortical areas of the hypothalamus, thalamus, caudate nucleus, and inferior and superior temporal gyri. On the other hand, the cerebral activation patterns during the neutral condition in both groups showed no significant differences (p < 0.01).

Conclusion: This study is the first demonstration of the functional neuroanatomy of the brain associated with sexual dysfunction in depressed patients using fMRI. In order to validate our physiological neuroscience results, further studies that would include patients with other disorders and sexual dysfunction, and depressed patients without sexual dysfunction and their treatment response are needed.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of the brain activation patterns between a healthy volunteer (42 years old) (A) and a depressed subject (40 years old) (B) in neutral condition. The colored functional maps were overlaid on the T1-weighted MR images. Note that the level of activation is significantly stronger in a healthy volunteer than in a depressed patient, especially in the visual and cerebellar cortices.
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Figure 1: Comparison of the brain activation patterns between a healthy volunteer (42 years old) (A) and a depressed subject (40 years old) (B) in neutral condition. The colored functional maps were overlaid on the T1-weighted MR images. Note that the level of activation is significantly stronger in a healthy volunteer than in a depressed patient, especially in the visual and cerebellar cortices.

Mentions: Figure 1 demonstrates the differential activation between healthy (Fig. 1A) and depressed subjects (Fig. 1B) for their neural patterns. Figures 2 and 3 show the fMR images on the 19 contiguous axial slices associated with visually evoked sexual arousal in the healthy volunteers and depressed subjects, respectively. The brain activation patterns during the neutral conditions for both the healthy and depressed subjects showed no significant differences at the level of p < 0.01 (Fig. 1): the middle and inferior occipital gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and thalamus were simultaneously activated in both cases.


Functional neuroanatomy in depressed patients with sexual dysfunction: blood oxygenation level dependent functional MR imaging.

Yang JC - Korean J Radiol (2004 Apr-Jun)

Comparison of the brain activation patterns between a healthy volunteer (42 years old) (A) and a depressed subject (40 years old) (B) in neutral condition. The colored functional maps were overlaid on the T1-weighted MR images. Note that the level of activation is significantly stronger in a healthy volunteer than in a depressed patient, especially in the visual and cerebellar cortices.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2698145&req=5

Figure 1: Comparison of the brain activation patterns between a healthy volunteer (42 years old) (A) and a depressed subject (40 years old) (B) in neutral condition. The colored functional maps were overlaid on the T1-weighted MR images. Note that the level of activation is significantly stronger in a healthy volunteer than in a depressed patient, especially in the visual and cerebellar cortices.
Mentions: Figure 1 demonstrates the differential activation between healthy (Fig. 1A) and depressed subjects (Fig. 1B) for their neural patterns. Figures 2 and 3 show the fMR images on the 19 contiguous axial slices associated with visually evoked sexual arousal in the healthy volunteers and depressed subjects, respectively. The brain activation patterns during the neutral conditions for both the healthy and depressed subjects showed no significant differences at the level of p < 0.01 (Fig. 1): the middle and inferior occipital gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and thalamus were simultaneously activated in both cases.

Bottom Line: There was a significant difference of brain activation between two groups during visual sexual stimulation.In depressed subjects, the level of activation during the visually evoked sexual arousal was significantly less than that of healthy volunteers, especially in the cerebrocortical areas of the hypothalamus, thalamus, caudate nucleus, and inferior and superior temporal gyri.On the other hand, the cerebral activation patterns during the neutral condition in both groups showed no significant differences (p < 0.01).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Chonnam National University Hospital, Kwangju, Korea. jcyang@chonnam.ac.kr

ABSTRACT

Objective: To demonstrate the functional neuroanatomy associated with sexual arousal visually evoked in depressed males who have underlying sexual dysfunction using Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent-based fMRI.

Materials and methods: Ten healthy volunteers (age range 21-55: mean 32.5 years), and 10 depressed subjects (age range 23-51: mean 34.4 years, mean Beck Depression Inventory score of 39.6+/-5.9, mean Hamilton Rating Scale Depression (HAMD)-17 score of 33.5+/-6.0) with sexual arousal dysfunction viewed erotic and neutral video films during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with 1.5 T MR scanner (GE Signa Horizon). The fMRI data were obtained from 7 oblique planes using gradient-echo EPI (flip angle/TR/TE= 90 degrees /6000 ms/50 ms). The visual stimulation paradigm began with 60 sec of black screen, 150 sec of neutral stimulation with a documentary video film, 30 sec of black screen, 150 sec of sexual stimulation with an erotic video film followed by 30 sec of black screen. The brain activation maps and their quantification were analyzed by SPM99 program.

Results: There was a significant difference of brain activation between two groups during visual sexual stimulation. In depressed subjects, the level of activation during the visually evoked sexual arousal was significantly less than that of healthy volunteers, especially in the cerebrocortical areas of the hypothalamus, thalamus, caudate nucleus, and inferior and superior temporal gyri. On the other hand, the cerebral activation patterns during the neutral condition in both groups showed no significant differences (p < 0.01).

Conclusion: This study is the first demonstration of the functional neuroanatomy of the brain associated with sexual dysfunction in depressed patients using fMRI. In order to validate our physiological neuroscience results, further studies that would include patients with other disorders and sexual dysfunction, and depressed patients without sexual dysfunction and their treatment response are needed.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus