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CSF flow quantification of the cerebral aqueduct in normal volunteers using phase contrast cine MR imaging.

Lee JH, Lee HK, Kim JK, Kim HJ, Park JK, Choi CG - Korean J Radiol (2004 Apr-Jun)

Bottom Line: The mean peak systolic velocities showed a tendency to increase from the superior to the inferior aqueduct, irrespective of the background baseline region, with the range being from 3.30 cm/sec to 4.08 cm/sec.However, these differences were not statistically significant.Although the peak systolic velocity and mean flow of the CSF differed somewhat according to the level of the cerebral aqueduct at which the measurement was made, this difference was not statistically significant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate whether the results of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow quantification differ according to the anatomical location of the cerebral aqueduct that is used and the background baseline region that is selected.

Materials and methods: The CSF hydrodynamics of eleven healthy volunteers (mean age = 29.6 years) were investigated on a 1.5 T MRI system. Velocity maps were acquired perpendicular to the cerebral aqueduct at three different anatomical levels: the inlet, ampulla and pars posterior. The pulse sequence was a prospectively triggered cardiac-gated flow compensated gradient-echo technique. Region-of-interest (ROI) analysis was performed for the CSF hydrodynamics, including the peak systolic velocity and mean flow on the phase images. The selection of the background baseline regions was done based on measurements made in two different areas, namely the anterior midbrain and temporal lobe, for 10 subjects.

Results: The mean peak systolic velocities showed a tendency to increase from the superior to the inferior aqueduct, irrespective of the background baseline region, with the range being from 3.30 cm/sec to 4.08 cm/sec. However, these differences were not statistically significant. In the case of the mean flow, the highest mean value was observed at the mid-portion of the ampulla (0.03 cm(3)/sec) in conjunction with the baseline ROI at the anterior midbrain. However, no other differences were observed among the mean flows according to the location of the cerebral aqueduct or the baseline ROI.

Conclusion: We obtained a set of reference data of the CSF peak velocity and mean flow through the cerebral aqueduct in young healthy volunteers. Although the peak systolic velocity and mean flow of the CSF differed somewhat according to the level of the cerebral aqueduct at which the measurement was made, this difference was not statistically significant.

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A. Normal anatomy of the cerebral aqueduct as viewed in the sagittal plane. The two arrows indicate the proximal and the distal ends of the cerebral aqueduct. The solid lines indicated by an A (the middle of the superior colliculus) and by a B (the level of the intercollicular sulcus) divide the aqueduct into the pars anterior, ampulla and pars posterior, craniocaudally, with the ampulla having the widest diameter and the pars posterior having the narrowest diameter.B. Midline sagittal T2-weighted image showing the positions of the localizers for the velocity map at each level of the cerebral aqueduct. The solid lines indicate the different positions of the localizers of the oblique axial images set perpendicular to the aqueduct of Sylvius. A; the inlet, B; the ampulla, C; the pars posterior.
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Figure 1: A. Normal anatomy of the cerebral aqueduct as viewed in the sagittal plane. The two arrows indicate the proximal and the distal ends of the cerebral aqueduct. The solid lines indicated by an A (the middle of the superior colliculus) and by a B (the level of the intercollicular sulcus) divide the aqueduct into the pars anterior, ampulla and pars posterior, craniocaudally, with the ampulla having the widest diameter and the pars posterior having the narrowest diameter.B. Midline sagittal T2-weighted image showing the positions of the localizers for the velocity map at each level of the cerebral aqueduct. The solid lines indicate the different positions of the localizers of the oblique axial images set perpendicular to the aqueduct of Sylvius. A; the inlet, B; the ampulla, C; the pars posterior.

Mentions: Anatomically, the cerebral aqueduct is divided into three parts, namely the pars anterior, ampulla and pars posterior, which are separated by two natural constrictions of the aqueductal lumen, one in the middle of the superior colliculus and the other at the level of the intercollicular sulcus (Fig. 1A). The pars posterior has the narrowest lumen of the cerebral aqueduct, while the ampulla has the widest lumen (19). Previous studies of CSF flow dynamics were made at a variety of different locations of the cerebral aqueduct, such as the mid-portion, the level of the inferior colliculi, or the junction with the fourth ventricle (18, 20, 21). To the best of our knowledge, however, there has been no study on the effects of scan level on CSF flow quantification.


CSF flow quantification of the cerebral aqueduct in normal volunteers using phase contrast cine MR imaging.

Lee JH, Lee HK, Kim JK, Kim HJ, Park JK, Choi CG - Korean J Radiol (2004 Apr-Jun)

A. Normal anatomy of the cerebral aqueduct as viewed in the sagittal plane. The two arrows indicate the proximal and the distal ends of the cerebral aqueduct. The solid lines indicated by an A (the middle of the superior colliculus) and by a B (the level of the intercollicular sulcus) divide the aqueduct into the pars anterior, ampulla and pars posterior, craniocaudally, with the ampulla having the widest diameter and the pars posterior having the narrowest diameter.B. Midline sagittal T2-weighted image showing the positions of the localizers for the velocity map at each level of the cerebral aqueduct. The solid lines indicate the different positions of the localizers of the oblique axial images set perpendicular to the aqueduct of Sylvius. A; the inlet, B; the ampulla, C; the pars posterior.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2698144&req=5

Figure 1: A. Normal anatomy of the cerebral aqueduct as viewed in the sagittal plane. The two arrows indicate the proximal and the distal ends of the cerebral aqueduct. The solid lines indicated by an A (the middle of the superior colliculus) and by a B (the level of the intercollicular sulcus) divide the aqueduct into the pars anterior, ampulla and pars posterior, craniocaudally, with the ampulla having the widest diameter and the pars posterior having the narrowest diameter.B. Midline sagittal T2-weighted image showing the positions of the localizers for the velocity map at each level of the cerebral aqueduct. The solid lines indicate the different positions of the localizers of the oblique axial images set perpendicular to the aqueduct of Sylvius. A; the inlet, B; the ampulla, C; the pars posterior.
Mentions: Anatomically, the cerebral aqueduct is divided into three parts, namely the pars anterior, ampulla and pars posterior, which are separated by two natural constrictions of the aqueductal lumen, one in the middle of the superior colliculus and the other at the level of the intercollicular sulcus (Fig. 1A). The pars posterior has the narrowest lumen of the cerebral aqueduct, while the ampulla has the widest lumen (19). Previous studies of CSF flow dynamics were made at a variety of different locations of the cerebral aqueduct, such as the mid-portion, the level of the inferior colliculi, or the junction with the fourth ventricle (18, 20, 21). To the best of our knowledge, however, there has been no study on the effects of scan level on CSF flow quantification.

Bottom Line: The mean peak systolic velocities showed a tendency to increase from the superior to the inferior aqueduct, irrespective of the background baseline region, with the range being from 3.30 cm/sec to 4.08 cm/sec.However, these differences were not statistically significant.Although the peak systolic velocity and mean flow of the CSF differed somewhat according to the level of the cerebral aqueduct at which the measurement was made, this difference was not statistically significant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate whether the results of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow quantification differ according to the anatomical location of the cerebral aqueduct that is used and the background baseline region that is selected.

Materials and methods: The CSF hydrodynamics of eleven healthy volunteers (mean age = 29.6 years) were investigated on a 1.5 T MRI system. Velocity maps were acquired perpendicular to the cerebral aqueduct at three different anatomical levels: the inlet, ampulla and pars posterior. The pulse sequence was a prospectively triggered cardiac-gated flow compensated gradient-echo technique. Region-of-interest (ROI) analysis was performed for the CSF hydrodynamics, including the peak systolic velocity and mean flow on the phase images. The selection of the background baseline regions was done based on measurements made in two different areas, namely the anterior midbrain and temporal lobe, for 10 subjects.

Results: The mean peak systolic velocities showed a tendency to increase from the superior to the inferior aqueduct, irrespective of the background baseline region, with the range being from 3.30 cm/sec to 4.08 cm/sec. However, these differences were not statistically significant. In the case of the mean flow, the highest mean value was observed at the mid-portion of the ampulla (0.03 cm(3)/sec) in conjunction with the baseline ROI at the anterior midbrain. However, no other differences were observed among the mean flows according to the location of the cerebral aqueduct or the baseline ROI.

Conclusion: We obtained a set of reference data of the CSF peak velocity and mean flow through the cerebral aqueduct in young healthy volunteers. Although the peak systolic velocity and mean flow of the CSF differed somewhat according to the level of the cerebral aqueduct at which the measurement was made, this difference was not statistically significant.

Show MeSH