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Techniques, clinical applications and limitations of 3D reconstruction in CT of the abdomen.

Maher MM, Kalra MK, Sahani DV, Perumpillichira JJ, Rizzo S, Saini S, Mueller PR - Korean J Radiol (2004 Jan-Mar)

Bottom Line: This pictorial essay describes the improvements in 3D reconstruction and technical aspects of 3D reconstruction and rendering techniques available for abdominal imaging.Clinical applications of 3D imaging in abdomen including liver, pancreaticobiliary system, urinary and gastrointestinal tracts and imaging before and after transplantation are discussed.In addition, this article briefly discusses the disadvantages of thin-slice acquisitions including increasing numbers of transverse images, which must be reviewed by the radiologist.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston 02184, USA. mmaher@partners.org

ABSTRACT
Enhanced z-axis coverage with thin overlapping slices in breath-hold acquisitions with multidetector CT (MDCT) has considerably enhanced the quality of multiplanar 3D reconstruction. This pictorial essay describes the improvements in 3D reconstruction and technical aspects of 3D reconstruction and rendering techniques available for abdominal imaging. Clinical applications of 3D imaging in abdomen including liver, pancreaticobiliary system, urinary and gastrointestinal tracts and imaging before and after transplantation are discussed. In addition, this article briefly discusses the disadvantages of thin-slice acquisitions including increasing numbers of transverse images, which must be reviewed by the radiologist.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

3D CT can combine advantages of intravenous urography and voiding cystourethrogram and retrograde urethrogrogram. Axial CT image (A) in 47-year-old man with recurrent urinary tract infection shows a dilated, ectopic left ureter (arrow) within the prostate. Sagittal multiplanar reconstruction (B) shows a dilated, ectopic ureter (arrow) opening into the posterior urethra. 3D surface rendering (C) demonstrates anatomic relationship of the ectopic ureter to the regional anatomy.
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Figure 13: 3D CT can combine advantages of intravenous urography and voiding cystourethrogram and retrograde urethrogrogram. Axial CT image (A) in 47-year-old man with recurrent urinary tract infection shows a dilated, ectopic left ureter (arrow) within the prostate. Sagittal multiplanar reconstruction (B) shows a dilated, ectopic ureter (arrow) opening into the posterior urethra. 3D surface rendering (C) demonstrates anatomic relationship of the ectopic ureter to the regional anatomy.

Mentions: 3D reconstruction has aided in convincing urologists of the advantages of CT urography over excretory urography in the evaluation of urinary tract pathology, as it allowed urologists to view images in the coronal plane, which were similar to excretory urography images (6). In addition, for radiologists, experience in the characterization of certain pathologies particularly those of the renal calices and papillae, such as renal tubular ectasia and papillary necrosis had been gained by evaluation of excretory urography images (Figs. 9, 10) (6). 3D reconstructions performed in the coronal plane closely resemble excretory urography images and review of these reconstructed images is very useful for characterizing these conditions. Indeed, Caoili et al. (6) have reported that 3D CT images are useful to radiologists and urologists as a "bridge" between excretory urography data and transverse CT data. 3D reconstruction also aids in evaluation of patients with anatomic variation of the urinary tract, contour abnormality of the renal outline and in confirmation of the site of ureteric obstruction (Figs. 11-13) (11). However, it should be emphasized that many 3D reformations suffer the same disadvantages as excretory urography if the transverse images are not reviewed in association. Many ureteral and bladder wall abnormalities are frequently detected on transverse images and can be missed on 3D reformats (6).


Techniques, clinical applications and limitations of 3D reconstruction in CT of the abdomen.

Maher MM, Kalra MK, Sahani DV, Perumpillichira JJ, Rizzo S, Saini S, Mueller PR - Korean J Radiol (2004 Jan-Mar)

3D CT can combine advantages of intravenous urography and voiding cystourethrogram and retrograde urethrogrogram. Axial CT image (A) in 47-year-old man with recurrent urinary tract infection shows a dilated, ectopic left ureter (arrow) within the prostate. Sagittal multiplanar reconstruction (B) shows a dilated, ectopic ureter (arrow) opening into the posterior urethra. 3D surface rendering (C) demonstrates anatomic relationship of the ectopic ureter to the regional anatomy.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2698114&req=5

Figure 13: 3D CT can combine advantages of intravenous urography and voiding cystourethrogram and retrograde urethrogrogram. Axial CT image (A) in 47-year-old man with recurrent urinary tract infection shows a dilated, ectopic left ureter (arrow) within the prostate. Sagittal multiplanar reconstruction (B) shows a dilated, ectopic ureter (arrow) opening into the posterior urethra. 3D surface rendering (C) demonstrates anatomic relationship of the ectopic ureter to the regional anatomy.
Mentions: 3D reconstruction has aided in convincing urologists of the advantages of CT urography over excretory urography in the evaluation of urinary tract pathology, as it allowed urologists to view images in the coronal plane, which were similar to excretory urography images (6). In addition, for radiologists, experience in the characterization of certain pathologies particularly those of the renal calices and papillae, such as renal tubular ectasia and papillary necrosis had been gained by evaluation of excretory urography images (Figs. 9, 10) (6). 3D reconstructions performed in the coronal plane closely resemble excretory urography images and review of these reconstructed images is very useful for characterizing these conditions. Indeed, Caoili et al. (6) have reported that 3D CT images are useful to radiologists and urologists as a "bridge" between excretory urography data and transverse CT data. 3D reconstruction also aids in evaluation of patients with anatomic variation of the urinary tract, contour abnormality of the renal outline and in confirmation of the site of ureteric obstruction (Figs. 11-13) (11). However, it should be emphasized that many 3D reformations suffer the same disadvantages as excretory urography if the transverse images are not reviewed in association. Many ureteral and bladder wall abnormalities are frequently detected on transverse images and can be missed on 3D reformats (6).

Bottom Line: This pictorial essay describes the improvements in 3D reconstruction and technical aspects of 3D reconstruction and rendering techniques available for abdominal imaging.Clinical applications of 3D imaging in abdomen including liver, pancreaticobiliary system, urinary and gastrointestinal tracts and imaging before and after transplantation are discussed.In addition, this article briefly discusses the disadvantages of thin-slice acquisitions including increasing numbers of transverse images, which must be reviewed by the radiologist.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston 02184, USA. mmaher@partners.org

ABSTRACT
Enhanced z-axis coverage with thin overlapping slices in breath-hold acquisitions with multidetector CT (MDCT) has considerably enhanced the quality of multiplanar 3D reconstruction. This pictorial essay describes the improvements in 3D reconstruction and technical aspects of 3D reconstruction and rendering techniques available for abdominal imaging. Clinical applications of 3D imaging in abdomen including liver, pancreaticobiliary system, urinary and gastrointestinal tracts and imaging before and after transplantation are discussed. In addition, this article briefly discusses the disadvantages of thin-slice acquisitions including increasing numbers of transverse images, which must be reviewed by the radiologist.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus