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Correlation of patient weight and cross-sectional dimensions with subjective image quality at standard dose abdominal CT.

Kalra MK, Maher MM, Prasad SR, Hayat MS, Blake MA, Varghese J, Halpern EF, Saini S - Korean J Radiol (2003 Oct-Dec)

Bottom Line: A statistically significant negative linear correlation of 0.46, 0.47, 0.47, 0.58, 0.56, 0.54, and 0.56 between patient weight, anterior abdominal fat thickness, anteroposterior and transverse diameter, circumference, cross-sectional area and image quality at standard scanning parameters was found (p<0.01).There is a significant association between image quality, patients' weight and cross-sectional abdominal dimensions.Maximum transverse diameter of the abdomen has the strongest association with subjective image quality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: We evaluated the association between patients' weight and abdominal cross-sectional dimensions and CT image quality.

Materials and methods: We prospectively evaluated 39 cancer patients aged more than 65 years with multislice CT scan of abdomen. All patients underwent equilibrium phase contrast-enhanced abdominal CT with 4 slices (from top of the right kidney) obtained at standard tube current (240-280 mA). All other scanning parameters were held constant. Patients' weight was measured just prior to the study. Cross-sectional abdominal dimensions such as circumference, area, average anterior abdominal wall fat thickness and, anteroposterior and transverse diameters were measured in all patients. Two subspecialty radiologists reviewed randomized images for overall image quality of abdominal structures using 5- point scale. Non-parametric correlation analysis was performed to determine the association of image quality with patients' weight and cross-sectional abdominal dimensions.

Results: A statistically significant negative linear correlation of 0.46, 0.47, 0.47, 0.58, 0.56, 0.54, and 0.56 between patient weight, anterior abdominal fat thickness, anteroposterior and transverse diameter, circumference, cross-sectional area and image quality at standard scanning parameters was found (p<0.01).

Conclusion: There is a significant association between image quality, patients' weight and cross-sectional abdominal dimensions. Maximum transverse diameter of the abdomen has the strongest association with subjective image quality.

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Scatter graph depicting distribution of patients' transverse diameter.
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Figure 2: Scatter graph depicting distribution of patients' transverse diameter.

Mentions: The range of patients' weights in our study was 41.77 to 102.15 kg (median weight = 77.18 kg) (Fig. 1). The range of cross-sectional transverse abdominal diameters was 25 to 42 cm with average diameter of 33 cm (Fig. 2). The range of measurements for the average anterior abdominal fat thickness, anteroposterior diameter, circumference and cross-sectional area of abdomen were 0.1-3.2 cm (average=1.77 cm), 15.5-34.2 cm (average=25.86 cm), 72-125 cm (average = 97.57 cm) and 386-1187 cm2 (average=727.33 cm2), respectively. Data documenting correlation between image quality and patients' abdominal dimensions are summarized in table 1. Significant negative correlation was found between image quality and patients' weight, anterior abdominal fat thickness anteroposterior and transverse diameter, circumference, and cross-sectional area (p<.01). With standard protocol abdominal CT studies, the transverse diameter of the patients had the strongest negative correlation with subjective image quality (p=.0001). A negative linear correlation of 0.56 between subjective image quality and root mean square dimension and circumference of abdomen was found (p<.002).


Correlation of patient weight and cross-sectional dimensions with subjective image quality at standard dose abdominal CT.

Kalra MK, Maher MM, Prasad SR, Hayat MS, Blake MA, Varghese J, Halpern EF, Saini S - Korean J Radiol (2003 Oct-Dec)

Scatter graph depicting distribution of patients' transverse diameter.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2698101&req=5

Figure 2: Scatter graph depicting distribution of patients' transverse diameter.
Mentions: The range of patients' weights in our study was 41.77 to 102.15 kg (median weight = 77.18 kg) (Fig. 1). The range of cross-sectional transverse abdominal diameters was 25 to 42 cm with average diameter of 33 cm (Fig. 2). The range of measurements for the average anterior abdominal fat thickness, anteroposterior diameter, circumference and cross-sectional area of abdomen were 0.1-3.2 cm (average=1.77 cm), 15.5-34.2 cm (average=25.86 cm), 72-125 cm (average = 97.57 cm) and 386-1187 cm2 (average=727.33 cm2), respectively. Data documenting correlation between image quality and patients' abdominal dimensions are summarized in table 1. Significant negative correlation was found between image quality and patients' weight, anterior abdominal fat thickness anteroposterior and transverse diameter, circumference, and cross-sectional area (p<.01). With standard protocol abdominal CT studies, the transverse diameter of the patients had the strongest negative correlation with subjective image quality (p=.0001). A negative linear correlation of 0.56 between subjective image quality and root mean square dimension and circumference of abdomen was found (p<.002).

Bottom Line: A statistically significant negative linear correlation of 0.46, 0.47, 0.47, 0.58, 0.56, 0.54, and 0.56 between patient weight, anterior abdominal fat thickness, anteroposterior and transverse diameter, circumference, cross-sectional area and image quality at standard scanning parameters was found (p<0.01).There is a significant association between image quality, patients' weight and cross-sectional abdominal dimensions.Maximum transverse diameter of the abdomen has the strongest association with subjective image quality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: We evaluated the association between patients' weight and abdominal cross-sectional dimensions and CT image quality.

Materials and methods: We prospectively evaluated 39 cancer patients aged more than 65 years with multislice CT scan of abdomen. All patients underwent equilibrium phase contrast-enhanced abdominal CT with 4 slices (from top of the right kidney) obtained at standard tube current (240-280 mA). All other scanning parameters were held constant. Patients' weight was measured just prior to the study. Cross-sectional abdominal dimensions such as circumference, area, average anterior abdominal wall fat thickness and, anteroposterior and transverse diameters were measured in all patients. Two subspecialty radiologists reviewed randomized images for overall image quality of abdominal structures using 5- point scale. Non-parametric correlation analysis was performed to determine the association of image quality with patients' weight and cross-sectional abdominal dimensions.

Results: A statistically significant negative linear correlation of 0.46, 0.47, 0.47, 0.58, 0.56, 0.54, and 0.56 between patient weight, anterior abdominal fat thickness, anteroposterior and transverse diameter, circumference, cross-sectional area and image quality at standard scanning parameters was found (p<0.01).

Conclusion: There is a significant association between image quality, patients' weight and cross-sectional abdominal dimensions. Maximum transverse diameter of the abdomen has the strongest association with subjective image quality.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus