Limits...
Internal thoracic artery collateral to the external iliac artery in chronic aortoiliac occlusive disease.

Kim J, Won JY, Park SI, Lee DY - Korean J Radiol (2003 Jul-Sep)

Bottom Line: In nine patients there was complete occlusion of the infrarenal aorta, or diffuse stenosis of 75% or more in the descending thoracic aorta, and in the other six, a patent aorta but complete occlusion or stenosis of 75% or more of the common iliac artery was demonstrated.Collateral perfusion via hypertrophied internal thoracic arteries and rich anastomoses between the superior and inferior epigastric arteries, reconstituting the external iliac artery, were noted in all fifteen patients, regardless of symptom duration, which ranged from six months to twelve years.In patients with chronic aortoiliac occlusive disease, the internal thoracic artery, along with visceral collaterals and those from the contralateral side, is one of the major parietal collateral pathways.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. dyl@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the incidence and angiographic findings of the collateral pathway involving the internal thoracic artery in patients with chronic aortoiliac occlusive disease.

Materials and methods: Between March 2000 and Februrary 2001, 124 patients at our hospital underwent angiographic evaluation of chronic aortoiliac occlusive disease, and in 15 of these complete obstruction or severe stenosis of the aortoiliac artery was identified. The aortograms and collateral arteriograms obtained, including internal thoracic arteriograms, as well as the medical records of the patients involved, were evaluated.

Results: In nine patients there was complete occlusion of the infrarenal aorta, or diffuse stenosis of 75% or more in the descending thoracic aorta, and in the other six, a patent aorta but complete occlusion or stenosis of 75% or more of the common iliac artery was demonstrated. Collateral perfusion via hypertrophied internal thoracic arteries and rich anastomoses between the superior and inferior epigastric arteries, reconstituting the external iliac artery, were noted in all fifteen patients, regardless of symptom duration, which ranged from six months to twelve years.

Conclusion: In patients with chronic aortoiliac occlusive disease, the internal thoracic artery, along with visceral collaterals and those from the contralateral side, is one of the major parietal collateral pathways.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic view of Fig. 1. In a patient with total occlusion of the infrarenal aorta and left subclavian artery, the internal thoracic artery provided total collateral perfusion to both lower extremities via the superior and inferior epigastric artery to the external iliac artery. The internal thoracic artery also provided perfusion to the opposing side via mediastinal collaterals.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2698085&req=5

Figure 2: Schematic view of Fig. 1. In a patient with total occlusion of the infrarenal aorta and left subclavian artery, the internal thoracic artery provided total collateral perfusion to both lower extremities via the superior and inferior epigastric artery to the external iliac artery. The internal thoracic artery also provided perfusion to the opposing side via mediastinal collaterals.

Mentions: ITA-SEA-IEA pathways serving as collateral feeders were identified in all fifteen patients (Figs. 1, 2). In nine, CAOD had affected the descending thoracic or abdominal aorta, and in six, the common iliac artery was affected and the aorta was patent. Hypertrophy of the ITA and rich anastomosis between the SEA and IEA, by which means the external iliac artery was reconstituted, was noted, regardless of the level of aortic occlusion. Among the nine patients with CAOD of the descending thoracic or abdominal aorta, in whom bilateral ITA angiography was performed, bilateral ITA-SEA-IEA collaterals were present in six, whereas three patients showed only one ITA-SEA-IEA collateral on either side. In one of the three, Takayasu's arteritis had caused unilateral subclavian arterial obstruction. At ITA angiography, visualization of the contralateral ITA via the mediastinal collateral was possible in only three cases.


Internal thoracic artery collateral to the external iliac artery in chronic aortoiliac occlusive disease.

Kim J, Won JY, Park SI, Lee DY - Korean J Radiol (2003 Jul-Sep)

Schematic view of Fig. 1. In a patient with total occlusion of the infrarenal aorta and left subclavian artery, the internal thoracic artery provided total collateral perfusion to both lower extremities via the superior and inferior epigastric artery to the external iliac artery. The internal thoracic artery also provided perfusion to the opposing side via mediastinal collaterals.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2698085&req=5

Figure 2: Schematic view of Fig. 1. In a patient with total occlusion of the infrarenal aorta and left subclavian artery, the internal thoracic artery provided total collateral perfusion to both lower extremities via the superior and inferior epigastric artery to the external iliac artery. The internal thoracic artery also provided perfusion to the opposing side via mediastinal collaterals.
Mentions: ITA-SEA-IEA pathways serving as collateral feeders were identified in all fifteen patients (Figs. 1, 2). In nine, CAOD had affected the descending thoracic or abdominal aorta, and in six, the common iliac artery was affected and the aorta was patent. Hypertrophy of the ITA and rich anastomosis between the SEA and IEA, by which means the external iliac artery was reconstituted, was noted, regardless of the level of aortic occlusion. Among the nine patients with CAOD of the descending thoracic or abdominal aorta, in whom bilateral ITA angiography was performed, bilateral ITA-SEA-IEA collaterals were present in six, whereas three patients showed only one ITA-SEA-IEA collateral on either side. In one of the three, Takayasu's arteritis had caused unilateral subclavian arterial obstruction. At ITA angiography, visualization of the contralateral ITA via the mediastinal collateral was possible in only three cases.

Bottom Line: In nine patients there was complete occlusion of the infrarenal aorta, or diffuse stenosis of 75% or more in the descending thoracic aorta, and in the other six, a patent aorta but complete occlusion or stenosis of 75% or more of the common iliac artery was demonstrated.Collateral perfusion via hypertrophied internal thoracic arteries and rich anastomoses between the superior and inferior epigastric arteries, reconstituting the external iliac artery, were noted in all fifteen patients, regardless of symptom duration, which ranged from six months to twelve years.In patients with chronic aortoiliac occlusive disease, the internal thoracic artery, along with visceral collaterals and those from the contralateral side, is one of the major parietal collateral pathways.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. dyl@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the incidence and angiographic findings of the collateral pathway involving the internal thoracic artery in patients with chronic aortoiliac occlusive disease.

Materials and methods: Between March 2000 and Februrary 2001, 124 patients at our hospital underwent angiographic evaluation of chronic aortoiliac occlusive disease, and in 15 of these complete obstruction or severe stenosis of the aortoiliac artery was identified. The aortograms and collateral arteriograms obtained, including internal thoracic arteriograms, as well as the medical records of the patients involved, were evaluated.

Results: In nine patients there was complete occlusion of the infrarenal aorta, or diffuse stenosis of 75% or more in the descending thoracic aorta, and in the other six, a patent aorta but complete occlusion or stenosis of 75% or more of the common iliac artery was demonstrated. Collateral perfusion via hypertrophied internal thoracic arteries and rich anastomoses between the superior and inferior epigastric arteries, reconstituting the external iliac artery, were noted in all fifteen patients, regardless of symptom duration, which ranged from six months to twelve years.

Conclusion: In patients with chronic aortoiliac occlusive disease, the internal thoracic artery, along with visceral collaterals and those from the contralateral side, is one of the major parietal collateral pathways.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus