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Fluoride intake through consumption of tap water and bottled water in Belgium.

Vandevijvere S, Horion B, Fondu M, Mozin MJ, Ulens M, Huybrechts I, van Oyen H, Noirfalise A - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2009)

Bottom Line: The probability of exceeding the UL of 7 mg per day via a normal diet was estimated to be low.Consequently, there is no need to revise the existing norms, but higher fluoride concentrations should be more clearly indicated on the labels.Reliable data about total dietary fluoride intake in children, including intake of fluoride via tooth paste and food supplements, are needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Scientific Institute of Public Health, Unit of Epidemiology, J. Wytsmanstraat 14, 1050 Brussels, Belgium. Stefanie.Vandevijvere@iph.fgov.be

ABSTRACT
There is a tendency to align higher levels of fluoride in natural mineral water with the existing higher levels in tap water. Treatment of natural mineral waters could harm the preservation of their natural character. In this study fluoride intake through bottled and tap water consumption in the Belgian adult population was assessed, taking into account regional differences. A deterministic approach was used whereby consumption quantities of tap water and different brands of bottled water were linked with their respective fluoride concentrations. Data from the national food consumption survey (2004) were used and the Nusser methodology was applied to obtain usual intake estimates.Mean intake of fluoride through total water consumption in Flanders was 1.4+/-0.7 mg/day (97.5(th) percentile: 3.1 mg/day), while in the Walloon region it was on average 0.9+/-0.6 mg/day (97.5(th) percentile: 2.4 mg/day). The probability of exceeding the UL of 7 mg per day via a normal diet was estimated to be low. Consequently, there is no need to revise the existing norms, but higher fluoride concentrations should be more clearly indicated on the labels. Reliable data about total dietary fluoride intake in children, including intake of fluoride via tooth paste and food supplements, are needed.

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Fluoride intake (mg/day) through consumption of tap water and bottled water by age group, for Flanders (up) and the Walloon region (including Brussels) (below).
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f2-ijerph-06-01676: Fluoride intake (mg/day) through consumption of tap water and bottled water by age group, for Flanders (up) and the Walloon region (including Brussels) (below).

Mentions: In Figures 1 and 2, it may be observed that for both regions, both sexes and all age groups the relative contribution of tap water consumption to the total fluoride intake was higher than the contribution of bottled water consumption. Fluoride exposure through consumption of tap water was higher in men than in women while fluoride exposure through consumption of bottled water was higher in women than in men in both regions. In both regions, the 19–59 year age group had the highest exposure to fluoride both through consumption of tap water and consumption of bottled water.


Fluoride intake through consumption of tap water and bottled water in Belgium.

Vandevijvere S, Horion B, Fondu M, Mozin MJ, Ulens M, Huybrechts I, van Oyen H, Noirfalise A - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2009)

Fluoride intake (mg/day) through consumption of tap water and bottled water by age group, for Flanders (up) and the Walloon region (including Brussels) (below).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2697936&req=5

f2-ijerph-06-01676: Fluoride intake (mg/day) through consumption of tap water and bottled water by age group, for Flanders (up) and the Walloon region (including Brussels) (below).
Mentions: In Figures 1 and 2, it may be observed that for both regions, both sexes and all age groups the relative contribution of tap water consumption to the total fluoride intake was higher than the contribution of bottled water consumption. Fluoride exposure through consumption of tap water was higher in men than in women while fluoride exposure through consumption of bottled water was higher in women than in men in both regions. In both regions, the 19–59 year age group had the highest exposure to fluoride both through consumption of tap water and consumption of bottled water.

Bottom Line: The probability of exceeding the UL of 7 mg per day via a normal diet was estimated to be low.Consequently, there is no need to revise the existing norms, but higher fluoride concentrations should be more clearly indicated on the labels.Reliable data about total dietary fluoride intake in children, including intake of fluoride via tooth paste and food supplements, are needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Scientific Institute of Public Health, Unit of Epidemiology, J. Wytsmanstraat 14, 1050 Brussels, Belgium. Stefanie.Vandevijvere@iph.fgov.be

ABSTRACT
There is a tendency to align higher levels of fluoride in natural mineral water with the existing higher levels in tap water. Treatment of natural mineral waters could harm the preservation of their natural character. In this study fluoride intake through bottled and tap water consumption in the Belgian adult population was assessed, taking into account regional differences. A deterministic approach was used whereby consumption quantities of tap water and different brands of bottled water were linked with their respective fluoride concentrations. Data from the national food consumption survey (2004) were used and the Nusser methodology was applied to obtain usual intake estimates.Mean intake of fluoride through total water consumption in Flanders was 1.4+/-0.7 mg/day (97.5(th) percentile: 3.1 mg/day), while in the Walloon region it was on average 0.9+/-0.6 mg/day (97.5(th) percentile: 2.4 mg/day). The probability of exceeding the UL of 7 mg per day via a normal diet was estimated to be low. Consequently, there is no need to revise the existing norms, but higher fluoride concentrations should be more clearly indicated on the labels. Reliable data about total dietary fluoride intake in children, including intake of fluoride via tooth paste and food supplements, are needed.

Show MeSH