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The potential impact on farmer health of enhanced export horticultural trade between the U.K. and Uganda.

Cross P, Edwards RT, Nyeko P, Edwards-Jones G - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2009)

Bottom Line: Self-reported health scores of 1,200 farm workers in the U.K. and Uganda were measured with the internationally recognised SF-36 questionnaire and compared to an international population norm.The age-corrected health status of U.K. farm workers was significantly lower than the population norm, whereas Ugandans scored significantly higher (indicating good health) for physical health and lower for mental health.If Ugandan produce enters U.K. markets, then consumers may wish to consider both the potential benefits that enhanced trade could offer Ugandan farmers compared with its impacts on U.K. workers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of the Environment and Natural Resources, Deiniol Road, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL572UW, UK. afs202@bangor.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
The export of vegetables from African countries to European markets presents consumers with an ethical dilemma: should they support local, but relatively well-off farmers, or poorer farmers from distant countries? This paper considers the issue of farm worker health in the U.K. and Uganda, and considers the dilemma facing U.K. consumers if Uganda achieves their aim of exporting more vegetables to the U.K. Self-reported health scores of 1,200 farm workers in the U.K. and Uganda were measured with the internationally recognised SF-36 questionnaire and compared to an international population norm. The age-corrected health status of U.K. farm workers was significantly lower than the population norm, whereas Ugandans scored significantly higher (indicating good health) for physical health and lower for mental health. If Ugandan produce enters U.K. markets, then consumers may wish to consider both the potential benefits that enhanced trade could offer Ugandan farmers compared with its impacts on U.K. workers.

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Ugandan mean health scale score by annual income class for mean Physical and Mental Component Summary scores (PCS and MCS).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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f2-ijerph-06-01539: Ugandan mean health scale score by annual income class for mean Physical and Mental Component Summary scores (PCS and MCS).

Mentions: The mean self-reported annual income per capita was $US 398, with males earning more than twice that of females (males $US 553, females $US 248). Ninety one percent of the sample population earned less than $US 1000 per annum. The incomes of these workers were aggregated into five income category groups to explore possible relationships between health scores and income categories. The mean PCS and MCS scores differed significantly between annual income classes (PCS df 3 p ≤ 0.001; MCS df 3 p ≤ 0.001) (Figure 2). As income increased so did the mean score for the health scales. Annual income in Uganda differed significantly with respect to the level of educational attainment (n = 437 p = 0.02). Mean annual income for those who attended primary school was $US 347 compared to $US 455 for those who attended secondary school.


The potential impact on farmer health of enhanced export horticultural trade between the U.K. and Uganda.

Cross P, Edwards RT, Nyeko P, Edwards-Jones G - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2009)

Ugandan mean health scale score by annual income class for mean Physical and Mental Component Summary scores (PCS and MCS).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2697928&req=5

f2-ijerph-06-01539: Ugandan mean health scale score by annual income class for mean Physical and Mental Component Summary scores (PCS and MCS).
Mentions: The mean self-reported annual income per capita was $US 398, with males earning more than twice that of females (males $US 553, females $US 248). Ninety one percent of the sample population earned less than $US 1000 per annum. The incomes of these workers were aggregated into five income category groups to explore possible relationships between health scores and income categories. The mean PCS and MCS scores differed significantly between annual income classes (PCS df 3 p ≤ 0.001; MCS df 3 p ≤ 0.001) (Figure 2). As income increased so did the mean score for the health scales. Annual income in Uganda differed significantly with respect to the level of educational attainment (n = 437 p = 0.02). Mean annual income for those who attended primary school was $US 347 compared to $US 455 for those who attended secondary school.

Bottom Line: Self-reported health scores of 1,200 farm workers in the U.K. and Uganda were measured with the internationally recognised SF-36 questionnaire and compared to an international population norm.The age-corrected health status of U.K. farm workers was significantly lower than the population norm, whereas Ugandans scored significantly higher (indicating good health) for physical health and lower for mental health.If Ugandan produce enters U.K. markets, then consumers may wish to consider both the potential benefits that enhanced trade could offer Ugandan farmers compared with its impacts on U.K. workers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of the Environment and Natural Resources, Deiniol Road, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL572UW, UK. afs202@bangor.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
The export of vegetables from African countries to European markets presents consumers with an ethical dilemma: should they support local, but relatively well-off farmers, or poorer farmers from distant countries? This paper considers the issue of farm worker health in the U.K. and Uganda, and considers the dilemma facing U.K. consumers if Uganda achieves their aim of exporting more vegetables to the U.K. Self-reported health scores of 1,200 farm workers in the U.K. and Uganda were measured with the internationally recognised SF-36 questionnaire and compared to an international population norm. The age-corrected health status of U.K. farm workers was significantly lower than the population norm, whereas Ugandans scored significantly higher (indicating good health) for physical health and lower for mental health. If Ugandan produce enters U.K. markets, then consumers may wish to consider both the potential benefits that enhanced trade could offer Ugandan farmers compared with its impacts on U.K. workers.

Show MeSH