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Angioid streaks, clinical course, complications, and current therapeutic management.

Georgalas I, Papaconstantinou D, Koutsandrea C, Kalantzis G, Karagiannis D, Georgopoulos G, Ladas I - Ther Clin Risk Manag (2009)

Bottom Line: Angioid streaks are visible irregular crack-like dehiscences in Bruch's membrane that are associated with atrophic degeneration of the overlying retinal pigmented epithelium.Angioid streaks may be associated with pseudoxanthoma elasticum, Paget's disease, sickle-cell anemia, acromegaly, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and diabetes mellitus, but also appear in patients without any systemic disease.However, it is likely that treatment with antivascular endothelial growth factor, especially in treatment-naive eyes to yield favorable results in the future and this has to be investigated in future studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, "G. Gennimatas" Hospital of Athens, NHS, Athens, Greece;

ABSTRACT
Angioid streaks are visible irregular crack-like dehiscences in Bruch's membrane that are associated with atrophic degeneration of the overlying retinal pigmented epithelium. Angioid streaks may be associated with pseudoxanthoma elasticum, Paget's disease, sickle-cell anemia, acromegaly, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and diabetes mellitus, but also appear in patients without any systemic disease. Patients with angioid streaks are generally asymptomatic, unless the lesions extend towards the foveola or develop complications such as traumatic Bruch's membrane rupture or macular choroidal neovascularization (CNV). The visual prognosis in patients with CNV secondary to angioid streaks if untreated, is poor and most treatment modalities, until recently, have failed to limit the devastating impact of CNV in central vision. However, it is likely that treatment with antivascular endothelial growth factor, especially in treatment-naive eyes to yield favorable results in the future and this has to be investigated in future studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Red free fundus photo showing typical angioid streaks.
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f1-tcrm-5-0081: Red free fundus photo showing typical angioid streaks.

Mentions: Angioid streaks are mainly asymptomatic. The appearance of symptoms occurs when the angioid streaks involve the foveola or in case of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in the macular region (Figures 1, 2).


Angioid streaks, clinical course, complications, and current therapeutic management.

Georgalas I, Papaconstantinou D, Koutsandrea C, Kalantzis G, Karagiannis D, Georgopoulos G, Ladas I - Ther Clin Risk Manag (2009)

Red free fundus photo showing typical angioid streaks.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2697526&req=5

f1-tcrm-5-0081: Red free fundus photo showing typical angioid streaks.
Mentions: Angioid streaks are mainly asymptomatic. The appearance of symptoms occurs when the angioid streaks involve the foveola or in case of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in the macular region (Figures 1, 2).

Bottom Line: Angioid streaks are visible irregular crack-like dehiscences in Bruch's membrane that are associated with atrophic degeneration of the overlying retinal pigmented epithelium.Angioid streaks may be associated with pseudoxanthoma elasticum, Paget's disease, sickle-cell anemia, acromegaly, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and diabetes mellitus, but also appear in patients without any systemic disease.However, it is likely that treatment with antivascular endothelial growth factor, especially in treatment-naive eyes to yield favorable results in the future and this has to be investigated in future studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, "G. Gennimatas" Hospital of Athens, NHS, Athens, Greece;

ABSTRACT
Angioid streaks are visible irregular crack-like dehiscences in Bruch's membrane that are associated with atrophic degeneration of the overlying retinal pigmented epithelium. Angioid streaks may be associated with pseudoxanthoma elasticum, Paget's disease, sickle-cell anemia, acromegaly, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and diabetes mellitus, but also appear in patients without any systemic disease. Patients with angioid streaks are generally asymptomatic, unless the lesions extend towards the foveola or develop complications such as traumatic Bruch's membrane rupture or macular choroidal neovascularization (CNV). The visual prognosis in patients with CNV secondary to angioid streaks if untreated, is poor and most treatment modalities, until recently, have failed to limit the devastating impact of CNV in central vision. However, it is likely that treatment with antivascular endothelial growth factor, especially in treatment-naive eyes to yield favorable results in the future and this has to be investigated in future studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus