Limits...
Anthracycline extravasation injuries: management with dexrazoxane.

Jordan K, Behlendorf T, Mueller F, Schmoll HJ - Ther Clin Risk Manag (2009)

Bottom Line: Tissue necrosis with skin ulceration is a possible outcome in the inadvertent extravasation of anthracyclines during intravenous administration.Until recently, there has been no effective treatment against the devastating effect of extravasated anthracycline.In two multicenter studies dexrazoxane has proven to be highly effective in preventing skin necrosis and ulceration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinic for Internal Medicine IV, Department for Oncology and Haematology, University Hospital Halle, Halle, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The application of anthracyclines in anticancer therapy may result in accidental extravasation injury and can be a serious complication of their use. Tissue necrosis with skin ulceration is a possible outcome in the inadvertent extravasation of anthracyclines during intravenous administration. Until recently, there has been no effective treatment against the devastating effect of extravasated anthracycline. Preclinical and clinical studies are leading to the clinical implementation of dexrazoxane as the first and only proven antidote in anthracycline extravasation. In two multicenter studies dexrazoxane has proven to be highly effective in preventing skin necrosis and ulceration. This review focuses on the development and management of dexrazoxane in anthracycline extravasation injuries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chemical structure of dexrazoxane.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2697522&req=5

f1-tcrm-5-361: Chemical structure of dexrazoxane.

Mentions: Dexrazoxane (ICRF-187) can be considered to be a neutral pro-drug analogue to the tetra-acid metal chelator EDTA. Chemically, dexrazoxane is 2,6-piperazinedione,4,4’-(1-methyl-1,2-ethanediyl) bis-,(S)- or (S)-(+)-1,2-bis(3,5-dioxopiperazin-1-yl)propane. Figure 1 shows the chemical structure.


Anthracycline extravasation injuries: management with dexrazoxane.

Jordan K, Behlendorf T, Mueller F, Schmoll HJ - Ther Clin Risk Manag (2009)

Chemical structure of dexrazoxane.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2697522&req=5

f1-tcrm-5-361: Chemical structure of dexrazoxane.
Mentions: Dexrazoxane (ICRF-187) can be considered to be a neutral pro-drug analogue to the tetra-acid metal chelator EDTA. Chemically, dexrazoxane is 2,6-piperazinedione,4,4’-(1-methyl-1,2-ethanediyl) bis-,(S)- or (S)-(+)-1,2-bis(3,5-dioxopiperazin-1-yl)propane. Figure 1 shows the chemical structure.

Bottom Line: Tissue necrosis with skin ulceration is a possible outcome in the inadvertent extravasation of anthracyclines during intravenous administration.Until recently, there has been no effective treatment against the devastating effect of extravasated anthracycline.In two multicenter studies dexrazoxane has proven to be highly effective in preventing skin necrosis and ulceration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinic for Internal Medicine IV, Department for Oncology and Haematology, University Hospital Halle, Halle, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The application of anthracyclines in anticancer therapy may result in accidental extravasation injury and can be a serious complication of their use. Tissue necrosis with skin ulceration is a possible outcome in the inadvertent extravasation of anthracyclines during intravenous administration. Until recently, there has been no effective treatment against the devastating effect of extravasated anthracycline. Preclinical and clinical studies are leading to the clinical implementation of dexrazoxane as the first and only proven antidote in anthracycline extravasation. In two multicenter studies dexrazoxane has proven to be highly effective in preventing skin necrosis and ulceration. This review focuses on the development and management of dexrazoxane in anthracycline extravasation injuries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus