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Jasmonic acid-induced volatiles of Brassica oleracea attract parasitoids: effects of time and dose, and comparison with induction by herbivores.

Bruinsma M, Posthumus MA, Mumm R, Mueller MJ, van Loon JJ, Dicke M - J. Exp. Bot. (2009)

Bottom Line: The effect of induction by exogenous application of jasmonic acid (JA) on the responses of Brussels sprouts plants and on host-location behaviour of associated parasitoid wasps was studied.Feeding by the biting-chewing herbivores Pieris rapae and Plutella xylostella resulted in significantly increased endogenous levels of JA, a central component in the octadecanoid signalling pathway that mediates induced plant defence.The levels of the intermediate 12-oxophyto-dienoic acid (OPDA) were significantly induced only after P. rapae feeding.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Entomology, Wageningen University, PO Box 8031, 6700 EH Wageningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Caterpillar feeding induces direct and indirect defences in brassicaceous plants. This study focused on the role of the octadecanoid pathway in induced indirect defence in Brassica oleracea. The effect of induction by exogenous application of jasmonic acid (JA) on the responses of Brussels sprouts plants and on host-location behaviour of associated parasitoid wasps was studied. Feeding by the biting-chewing herbivores Pieris rapae and Plutella xylostella resulted in significantly increased endogenous levels of JA, a central component in the octadecanoid signalling pathway that mediates induced plant defence. The levels of the intermediate 12-oxophyto-dienoic acid (OPDA) were significantly induced only after P. rapae feeding. Three species of parasitoid wasps, Cotesia glomerata, C. rubecula, and Diadegma semiclausum, differing in host range and host specificity, were tested for their behavioural responses to volatiles from herbivore-induced, JA-induced, and non-induced plants. All three species were attracted to volatiles from JA-induced plants compared with control plants; however, they preferred volatiles from herbivore-induced plants over volatiles from JA-induced plants. Attraction of C. glomerata depended on both timing and dose of JA application. JA-induced plants produced larger quantities of volatiles than herbivore-induced and control plants, indicating that not only quantity, but also quality of the volatile blend is important in the host-location behaviour of the wasps.

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Effect of the concentration of jasmonic acid (JA) applied to Brussels sprouts plants on the attraction of the parasitoid C. glomerata in a windtunnel. Plants treated with different concentrations of JA (24 h before the windtunnel test) are tested against control plants. The percentage of wasps that landed on the JA-treated and on control plants is shown (n.s. P >0.05, *P <0.05, ***P <0.001). The numbers to the right of each bar represent the number of wasps that made a choice; between brackets are the total number of wasps tested. The percentage of parasitoids that made no choice decreased with increasing JA concentration (Spearman rank correlation: P <0.001).
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fig2: Effect of the concentration of jasmonic acid (JA) applied to Brussels sprouts plants on the attraction of the parasitoid C. glomerata in a windtunnel. Plants treated with different concentrations of JA (24 h before the windtunnel test) are tested against control plants. The percentage of wasps that landed on the JA-treated and on control plants is shown (n.s. P >0.05, *P <0.05, ***P <0.001). The numbers to the right of each bar represent the number of wasps that made a choice; between brackets are the total number of wasps tested. The percentage of parasitoids that made no choice decreased with increasing JA concentration (Spearman rank correlation: P <0.001).

Mentions: The preference of C. glomerata for the volatiles from JA-treated or control plants was tested in dual-choice tests in the windtunnel for four concentrations of JA, i.e. 1 μM, 10 μM, 100 μM, and 1 mM. The JA-treated plants were significantly more attractive than the control plants when treated with 10 μM (binomial test: n=30, P=0.049), 100 μM n=30, P <0.001) and 1 mM JA (n=30, P <0.001) (Fig. 2). Only for the lowest concentration tested did the parasitoids not show a preference for either of the plants (binomial test: n=21, P=0.50) (Fig. 2). With decreasing JA concentration, the response level of the parasitoids decreased from ∼60% to a level of <30% for the lowest concentration tested (Fig. 2). A negative correlation between the JA concentration and the percentage no choice was found (Spearman's ρ=–0.671, n=31, P <0.001).


Jasmonic acid-induced volatiles of Brassica oleracea attract parasitoids: effects of time and dose, and comparison with induction by herbivores.

Bruinsma M, Posthumus MA, Mumm R, Mueller MJ, van Loon JJ, Dicke M - J. Exp. Bot. (2009)

Effect of the concentration of jasmonic acid (JA) applied to Brussels sprouts plants on the attraction of the parasitoid C. glomerata in a windtunnel. Plants treated with different concentrations of JA (24 h before the windtunnel test) are tested against control plants. The percentage of wasps that landed on the JA-treated and on control plants is shown (n.s. P >0.05, *P <0.05, ***P <0.001). The numbers to the right of each bar represent the number of wasps that made a choice; between brackets are the total number of wasps tested. The percentage of parasitoids that made no choice decreased with increasing JA concentration (Spearman rank correlation: P <0.001).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2692006&req=5

fig2: Effect of the concentration of jasmonic acid (JA) applied to Brussels sprouts plants on the attraction of the parasitoid C. glomerata in a windtunnel. Plants treated with different concentrations of JA (24 h before the windtunnel test) are tested against control plants. The percentage of wasps that landed on the JA-treated and on control plants is shown (n.s. P >0.05, *P <0.05, ***P <0.001). The numbers to the right of each bar represent the number of wasps that made a choice; between brackets are the total number of wasps tested. The percentage of parasitoids that made no choice decreased with increasing JA concentration (Spearman rank correlation: P <0.001).
Mentions: The preference of C. glomerata for the volatiles from JA-treated or control plants was tested in dual-choice tests in the windtunnel for four concentrations of JA, i.e. 1 μM, 10 μM, 100 μM, and 1 mM. The JA-treated plants were significantly more attractive than the control plants when treated with 10 μM (binomial test: n=30, P=0.049), 100 μM n=30, P <0.001) and 1 mM JA (n=30, P <0.001) (Fig. 2). Only for the lowest concentration tested did the parasitoids not show a preference for either of the plants (binomial test: n=21, P=0.50) (Fig. 2). With decreasing JA concentration, the response level of the parasitoids decreased from ∼60% to a level of <30% for the lowest concentration tested (Fig. 2). A negative correlation between the JA concentration and the percentage no choice was found (Spearman's ρ=–0.671, n=31, P <0.001).

Bottom Line: The effect of induction by exogenous application of jasmonic acid (JA) on the responses of Brussels sprouts plants and on host-location behaviour of associated parasitoid wasps was studied.Feeding by the biting-chewing herbivores Pieris rapae and Plutella xylostella resulted in significantly increased endogenous levels of JA, a central component in the octadecanoid signalling pathway that mediates induced plant defence.The levels of the intermediate 12-oxophyto-dienoic acid (OPDA) were significantly induced only after P. rapae feeding.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Entomology, Wageningen University, PO Box 8031, 6700 EH Wageningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Caterpillar feeding induces direct and indirect defences in brassicaceous plants. This study focused on the role of the octadecanoid pathway in induced indirect defence in Brassica oleracea. The effect of induction by exogenous application of jasmonic acid (JA) on the responses of Brussels sprouts plants and on host-location behaviour of associated parasitoid wasps was studied. Feeding by the biting-chewing herbivores Pieris rapae and Plutella xylostella resulted in significantly increased endogenous levels of JA, a central component in the octadecanoid signalling pathway that mediates induced plant defence. The levels of the intermediate 12-oxophyto-dienoic acid (OPDA) were significantly induced only after P. rapae feeding. Three species of parasitoid wasps, Cotesia glomerata, C. rubecula, and Diadegma semiclausum, differing in host range and host specificity, were tested for their behavioural responses to volatiles from herbivore-induced, JA-induced, and non-induced plants. All three species were attracted to volatiles from JA-induced plants compared with control plants; however, they preferred volatiles from herbivore-induced plants over volatiles from JA-induced plants. Attraction of C. glomerata depended on both timing and dose of JA application. JA-induced plants produced larger quantities of volatiles than herbivore-induced and control plants, indicating that not only quantity, but also quality of the volatile blend is important in the host-location behaviour of the wasps.

Show MeSH