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Cocaine modulates locomotion behavior in C. elegans.

Ward A, Walker VJ, Feng Z, Xu XZ - PLoS ONE (2009)

Bottom Line: Here, we tested the effect of cocaine on C. elegans behavior.We further show that the behavioral response to cocaine is primarily mediated by the ionotropic serotonin receptor MOD-1.Thus, cocaine modulates locomotion behavior in C. elegans primarily by impinging on its serotoninergic system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Cocaine, a potent addictive substance, is an inhibitor of monoamine transporters, including DAT (dopamine transporter), SERT (serotonin transporter) and NET (norepinephrine transporter). Cocaine administration induces complex behavioral alterations in mammals, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we tested the effect of cocaine on C. elegans behavior. We show for the first time that acute cocaine treatment evokes changes in C. elegans locomotor activity. Interestingly, the neurotransmitter serotonin, rather than dopamine, is required for cocaine response in C. elegans. The C. elegans SERT MOD-5 is essential for the effect of cocaine, consistent with the role of cocaine in targeting monoamine transporters. We further show that the behavioral response to cocaine is primarily mediated by the ionotropic serotonin receptor MOD-1. Thus, cocaine modulates locomotion behavior in C. elegans primarily by impinging on its serotoninergic system.

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Cocaine induces a hypolocomotor response in C. elegans.(A–B) Worms were tracked on plates without cocaine (A) or with 1.5 mM cocaine. Shown are traces averaged from 10 worms. (C) Worms respond to cocaine in a dose-dependent manner. 10 worms were assayed for each concentration. Error bars: SEM.
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pone-0005946-g001: Cocaine induces a hypolocomotor response in C. elegans.(A–B) Worms were tracked on plates without cocaine (A) or with 1.5 mM cocaine. Shown are traces averaged from 10 worms. (C) Worms respond to cocaine in a dose-dependent manner. 10 worms were assayed for each concentration. Error bars: SEM.

Mentions: In rodent and fly models, acute administration of cocaine to naïve animals alters locomotor activity, a behavioral parameter commonly used for the study of cocaine responses in mammals [22], [23]. To determine whether cocaine modulates motor behavior in the genetic model C. elegans, we employed an automated worm tracking system that records worm locomotion and reports its activity in real time [24]. Previous work in our lab using this tracking system has demonstrated that naïve worms transferred to a new plate display a gradual decline in locomotion velocity until reaching a relatively steady state or basal speed [19]. This finding is attributed to the worm's locomotor response to a new environment (i.e. a new plate with fresh bacteria), and is consistent with previous work [25]. In this study, we assayed locomotion behavior after transferring worms to plates containing cocaine in the agar. The response to cocaine was quantified as average locomotion velocity during the tracking period. Using this measure, we found that cocaine significantly decreased average locomotion velocity in wild-type worms in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that cocaine can evoke a hypolocomotor response in C. elegans (Figure 1 and Supplementary Table S1).


Cocaine modulates locomotion behavior in C. elegans.

Ward A, Walker VJ, Feng Z, Xu XZ - PLoS ONE (2009)

Cocaine induces a hypolocomotor response in C. elegans.(A–B) Worms were tracked on plates without cocaine (A) or with 1.5 mM cocaine. Shown are traces averaged from 10 worms. (C) Worms respond to cocaine in a dose-dependent manner. 10 worms were assayed for each concentration. Error bars: SEM.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2691951&req=5

pone-0005946-g001: Cocaine induces a hypolocomotor response in C. elegans.(A–B) Worms were tracked on plates without cocaine (A) or with 1.5 mM cocaine. Shown are traces averaged from 10 worms. (C) Worms respond to cocaine in a dose-dependent manner. 10 worms were assayed for each concentration. Error bars: SEM.
Mentions: In rodent and fly models, acute administration of cocaine to naïve animals alters locomotor activity, a behavioral parameter commonly used for the study of cocaine responses in mammals [22], [23]. To determine whether cocaine modulates motor behavior in the genetic model C. elegans, we employed an automated worm tracking system that records worm locomotion and reports its activity in real time [24]. Previous work in our lab using this tracking system has demonstrated that naïve worms transferred to a new plate display a gradual decline in locomotion velocity until reaching a relatively steady state or basal speed [19]. This finding is attributed to the worm's locomotor response to a new environment (i.e. a new plate with fresh bacteria), and is consistent with previous work [25]. In this study, we assayed locomotion behavior after transferring worms to plates containing cocaine in the agar. The response to cocaine was quantified as average locomotion velocity during the tracking period. Using this measure, we found that cocaine significantly decreased average locomotion velocity in wild-type worms in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that cocaine can evoke a hypolocomotor response in C. elegans (Figure 1 and Supplementary Table S1).

Bottom Line: Here, we tested the effect of cocaine on C. elegans behavior.We further show that the behavioral response to cocaine is primarily mediated by the ionotropic serotonin receptor MOD-1.Thus, cocaine modulates locomotion behavior in C. elegans primarily by impinging on its serotoninergic system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Cocaine, a potent addictive substance, is an inhibitor of monoamine transporters, including DAT (dopamine transporter), SERT (serotonin transporter) and NET (norepinephrine transporter). Cocaine administration induces complex behavioral alterations in mammals, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we tested the effect of cocaine on C. elegans behavior. We show for the first time that acute cocaine treatment evokes changes in C. elegans locomotor activity. Interestingly, the neurotransmitter serotonin, rather than dopamine, is required for cocaine response in C. elegans. The C. elegans SERT MOD-5 is essential for the effect of cocaine, consistent with the role of cocaine in targeting monoamine transporters. We further show that the behavioral response to cocaine is primarily mediated by the ionotropic serotonin receptor MOD-1. Thus, cocaine modulates locomotion behavior in C. elegans primarily by impinging on its serotoninergic system.

Show MeSH