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HPV infection and p53 inactivation in pterygium.

Tsai YY, Chang CC, Chiang CC, Yeh KT, Chen PL, Chang CH, Chou MC, Lee H, Cheng YW - Mol. Vis. (2009)

Bottom Line: Inactivation of p53 by Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16/18 E6 plays a crucial role in cervical tumorigenesis.In this study, we further speculate that p53 inactivation may be linked with HPV infection in pterygium pathogenesis.HPV 16/18 infection was detected by nested-polymerase chain reaction (nested-PCR), the p53 mutation was detected by direct sequencing, and the p53 and the HPV 16/18 E6 proteins were studied using immunohistochemistry on 129 pterygial specimens and 20 normal conjunctivas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Our recent report indicated that tumor suppressor gene (p53) mutations and protein aberrant expression were detected in pterygium. Inactivation of p53 by Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16/18 E6 plays a crucial role in cervical tumorigenesis. In this study, we further speculate that p53 inactivation may be linked with HPV infection in pterygium pathogenesis. To investigate the involvement of HPV 16/18 E6 in p53 inactivation in pterygium, the association between HPV 16 or HPV 18 infection, the HPV E6 oncoprotein, and p53 protein expression was analyzed in this study.

Methods: HPV 16/18 infection was detected by nested-polymerase chain reaction (nested-PCR), the p53 mutation was detected by direct sequencing, and the p53 and the HPV 16/18 E6 proteins were studied using immunohistochemistry on 129 pterygial specimens and 20 normal conjunctivas.

Results: The HPV 16/18 was detected in 24% of the pterygium tissues (31 of 129) but not in the normal conjunctiva, and the HPV16/18 E6 oncoprotein was detected in 48.3% of HPV 16/18 DNA-positive pterygium tissues (15 of 31). In addition, p53 protein negative expression in pterygium was correlated with HPV16/18 E6 oncoprotein expression but not with a p53 mutation.

Conclusions: HPV 16/18 E6 contributes to HPV-mediated pterygium pathogenesis as it is partly involved in p53 inactivation and is expressed in HPV DNA-positive pterygium.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Representative positive and negative immunostaining for HPV 16/18 E6 protein in paraffin sections of pterygium. Representative positive HPV 16/18 E6 immunostaining is shown in (A). The brown color pointed out by the red arrow indicates a HPV 16/18 positive signal. Negative HPV 16/18 E6 immunostaining is shown in (B).
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f1: Representative positive and negative immunostaining for HPV 16/18 E6 protein in paraffin sections of pterygium. Representative positive HPV 16/18 E6 immunostaining is shown in (A). The brown color pointed out by the red arrow indicates a HPV 16/18 positive signal. Negative HPV 16/18 E6 immunostaining is shown in (B).

Mentions: After successfully detecting HPV infection in pterygium tissues, we attempted to determine by immunohistochemistry whether HPV 16/18 E6 is expressed to verify the association between HPV infection and HPV16/18 E6 expression. HPV 16/18 E6 protein staining was limited to the nuclei of the epithelial layer (Figure 1). Our data showed that HPV 16/18 E6 was only detected in 48.3% (15 of 31) of HPV 16/18 DNA positive pterygium tissues. Not any HPV-negative pterygium and control group had HPV 16/18 E6 protein expression (Table 2; p<0.0001).


HPV infection and p53 inactivation in pterygium.

Tsai YY, Chang CC, Chiang CC, Yeh KT, Chen PL, Chang CH, Chou MC, Lee H, Cheng YW - Mol. Vis. (2009)

Representative positive and negative immunostaining for HPV 16/18 E6 protein in paraffin sections of pterygium. Representative positive HPV 16/18 E6 immunostaining is shown in (A). The brown color pointed out by the red arrow indicates a HPV 16/18 positive signal. Negative HPV 16/18 E6 immunostaining is shown in (B).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2690956&req=5

f1: Representative positive and negative immunostaining for HPV 16/18 E6 protein in paraffin sections of pterygium. Representative positive HPV 16/18 E6 immunostaining is shown in (A). The brown color pointed out by the red arrow indicates a HPV 16/18 positive signal. Negative HPV 16/18 E6 immunostaining is shown in (B).
Mentions: After successfully detecting HPV infection in pterygium tissues, we attempted to determine by immunohistochemistry whether HPV 16/18 E6 is expressed to verify the association between HPV infection and HPV16/18 E6 expression. HPV 16/18 E6 protein staining was limited to the nuclei of the epithelial layer (Figure 1). Our data showed that HPV 16/18 E6 was only detected in 48.3% (15 of 31) of HPV 16/18 DNA positive pterygium tissues. Not any HPV-negative pterygium and control group had HPV 16/18 E6 protein expression (Table 2; p<0.0001).

Bottom Line: Inactivation of p53 by Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16/18 E6 plays a crucial role in cervical tumorigenesis.In this study, we further speculate that p53 inactivation may be linked with HPV infection in pterygium pathogenesis.HPV 16/18 infection was detected by nested-polymerase chain reaction (nested-PCR), the p53 mutation was detected by direct sequencing, and the p53 and the HPV 16/18 E6 proteins were studied using immunohistochemistry on 129 pterygial specimens and 20 normal conjunctivas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Our recent report indicated that tumor suppressor gene (p53) mutations and protein aberrant expression were detected in pterygium. Inactivation of p53 by Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16/18 E6 plays a crucial role in cervical tumorigenesis. In this study, we further speculate that p53 inactivation may be linked with HPV infection in pterygium pathogenesis. To investigate the involvement of HPV 16/18 E6 in p53 inactivation in pterygium, the association between HPV 16 or HPV 18 infection, the HPV E6 oncoprotein, and p53 protein expression was analyzed in this study.

Methods: HPV 16/18 infection was detected by nested-polymerase chain reaction (nested-PCR), the p53 mutation was detected by direct sequencing, and the p53 and the HPV 16/18 E6 proteins were studied using immunohistochemistry on 129 pterygial specimens and 20 normal conjunctivas.

Results: The HPV 16/18 was detected in 24% of the pterygium tissues (31 of 129) but not in the normal conjunctiva, and the HPV16/18 E6 oncoprotein was detected in 48.3% of HPV 16/18 DNA-positive pterygium tissues (15 of 31). In addition, p53 protein negative expression in pterygium was correlated with HPV16/18 E6 oncoprotein expression but not with a p53 mutation.

Conclusions: HPV 16/18 E6 contributes to HPV-mediated pterygium pathogenesis as it is partly involved in p53 inactivation and is expressed in HPV DNA-positive pterygium.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus