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Effect of body fat distribution on the transcription response to dietary fat interventions.

Radonjic M, van Erk MJ, Pasman WJ, Wortelboer HM, Hendriks HF, van Ommen B - Genes Nutr (2009)

Bottom Line: Combination of decreased energy expenditure and increased food intake results in fat accumulation either in the abdominal site (upper body obesity, UBO) or on the hips (lower body obesity, LBO).In this study, we used microarray gene expression profiling of adipose tissue biopsies to investigate the effect of body fat distribution on the physiological response to two dietary fat interventions.The body fat distribution is, therefore, an important parameter to consider when providing personalized dietary recommendation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: TNO Quality of Life, Business Unit Biosciences, P.O. Box 360, 3700 AJ, Zeist, The Netherlands, marijana.radonjic@tno.nl.

ABSTRACT
Combination of decreased energy expenditure and increased food intake results in fat accumulation either in the abdominal site (upper body obesity, UBO) or on the hips (lower body obesity, LBO). In this study, we used microarray gene expression profiling of adipose tissue biopsies to investigate the effect of body fat distribution on the physiological response to two dietary fat interventions. Mildly obese UBO and LBO male subjects (n = 12, waist-to-hip ratio range 0.93-1.12) were subjected to consumption of diets containing predominantly either long-chain fatty acids (PUFA) or medium-chain fatty acids (MCT). The results revealed (1) a large variation in transcription response to MCT and PUFA diets between UBO and LBO subjects, (2) higher sensitivity of UBO subjects to MCT/PUFA dietary intervention and (3) the upregulation of immune and apoptotic pathways and downregulation of metabolic pathways (oxidative, lipid, carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism) in UBO subjects when consuming MCT compared with PUFA diet. In conclusion, we report that despite the recommendation of MCT-based diet for improving obesity phenotype, this diet may have adverse effect on inflammatory and metabolic status of UBO subjects. The body fat distribution is, therefore, an important parameter to consider when providing personalized dietary recommendation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Principal component analysis of the adipose tissue gene expression. Principal component analysis of the adipose tissue gene expression in 11 subjects, each in two dietary conditions (five UBO and six LBO, each after consumption of both MCT and PUFA spread). There is a large inter-subject variation in gene expression response to MCT and PUFA treatments. The distinction between UBO and LBO groups explains most variance observed in the data (red versus green dots)
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Fig1: Principal component analysis of the adipose tissue gene expression. Principal component analysis of the adipose tissue gene expression in 11 subjects, each in two dietary conditions (five UBO and six LBO, each after consumption of both MCT and PUFA spread). There is a large inter-subject variation in gene expression response to MCT and PUFA treatments. The distinction between UBO and LBO groups explains most variance observed in the data (red versus green dots)

Mentions: After preprocessing of the microarray data, normalized expression values were obtained for 9,716 genes expressed in subcutaneous adipose tissue. The global relations among the gene expression signatures of subjects fed two diets were assessed by principal component analysis (PCA) (Fig. 1). This reveals a large inter-subject variation in the transcription response to MCT and PUFA dietary interventions. Moreover, the division of subjects to an UBO and LBO group explains more variance in gene expression than the grouping of subjects according to a diet. This shows that the body fat distribution represents the principal determinant of a diet effect on the adipose tissue gene expression. The observed relevance of body fat distribution for the effects of dietary fat interventions underscores different physiological characteristics of UBO and LBO subjects and suggests that this phenotypic property should be considered when assessing MCT and PUFA diet effects.Fig. 1


Effect of body fat distribution on the transcription response to dietary fat interventions.

Radonjic M, van Erk MJ, Pasman WJ, Wortelboer HM, Hendriks HF, van Ommen B - Genes Nutr (2009)

Principal component analysis of the adipose tissue gene expression. Principal component analysis of the adipose tissue gene expression in 11 subjects, each in two dietary conditions (five UBO and six LBO, each after consumption of both MCT and PUFA spread). There is a large inter-subject variation in gene expression response to MCT and PUFA treatments. The distinction between UBO and LBO groups explains most variance observed in the data (red versus green dots)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2690730&req=5

Fig1: Principal component analysis of the adipose tissue gene expression. Principal component analysis of the adipose tissue gene expression in 11 subjects, each in two dietary conditions (five UBO and six LBO, each after consumption of both MCT and PUFA spread). There is a large inter-subject variation in gene expression response to MCT and PUFA treatments. The distinction between UBO and LBO groups explains most variance observed in the data (red versus green dots)
Mentions: After preprocessing of the microarray data, normalized expression values were obtained for 9,716 genes expressed in subcutaneous adipose tissue. The global relations among the gene expression signatures of subjects fed two diets were assessed by principal component analysis (PCA) (Fig. 1). This reveals a large inter-subject variation in the transcription response to MCT and PUFA dietary interventions. Moreover, the division of subjects to an UBO and LBO group explains more variance in gene expression than the grouping of subjects according to a diet. This shows that the body fat distribution represents the principal determinant of a diet effect on the adipose tissue gene expression. The observed relevance of body fat distribution for the effects of dietary fat interventions underscores different physiological characteristics of UBO and LBO subjects and suggests that this phenotypic property should be considered when assessing MCT and PUFA diet effects.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Combination of decreased energy expenditure and increased food intake results in fat accumulation either in the abdominal site (upper body obesity, UBO) or on the hips (lower body obesity, LBO).In this study, we used microarray gene expression profiling of adipose tissue biopsies to investigate the effect of body fat distribution on the physiological response to two dietary fat interventions.The body fat distribution is, therefore, an important parameter to consider when providing personalized dietary recommendation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: TNO Quality of Life, Business Unit Biosciences, P.O. Box 360, 3700 AJ, Zeist, The Netherlands, marijana.radonjic@tno.nl.

ABSTRACT
Combination of decreased energy expenditure and increased food intake results in fat accumulation either in the abdominal site (upper body obesity, UBO) or on the hips (lower body obesity, LBO). In this study, we used microarray gene expression profiling of adipose tissue biopsies to investigate the effect of body fat distribution on the physiological response to two dietary fat interventions. Mildly obese UBO and LBO male subjects (n = 12, waist-to-hip ratio range 0.93-1.12) were subjected to consumption of diets containing predominantly either long-chain fatty acids (PUFA) or medium-chain fatty acids (MCT). The results revealed (1) a large variation in transcription response to MCT and PUFA diets between UBO and LBO subjects, (2) higher sensitivity of UBO subjects to MCT/PUFA dietary intervention and (3) the upregulation of immune and apoptotic pathways and downregulation of metabolic pathways (oxidative, lipid, carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism) in UBO subjects when consuming MCT compared with PUFA diet. In conclusion, we report that despite the recommendation of MCT-based diet for improving obesity phenotype, this diet may have adverse effect on inflammatory and metabolic status of UBO subjects. The body fat distribution is, therefore, an important parameter to consider when providing personalized dietary recommendation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus