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Survey on prevalence and risk factors on HIV-1 among pregnant women in North-Rift, Kenya: a hospital based cross-sectional study conducted between 2005 and 2006.

Kiptoo M, Mpoke S, Ng'ang'a Z, Mueke J, Okoth F, Songok E - BMC Int Health Hum Rights (2009)

Bottom Line: The majority (85.1%) of the antenatal attendees did not know their HIV status prior to visiting the clinic for antenatal care.The 31-35 age group had the highest (8.5%) HIV prevalence, while women aged more than 35 years had the lowest (2.5%).Women in a polygamous relationship were significantly more likely to be HIV infected as compared to those in a monogamous relationship (p = 0.000).Seroprevalence of HIV was found to be consistent with the reports from the national HIV sentinel surveys.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Virus Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya. mkiptoo@kemri.org

ABSTRACT

Background: The HIV/AIDS epidemic in Kenya is a major public-health problem. Estimating the prevalence of HIV in pregnant women provides essential information for an effective implementation of HIV/AIDS control measures and monitoring of HIV spread within a country. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of HIV infection, risk factors for HIV/AIDS and immunologic (lymphocyte profile) characteristics among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in three district hospitals in North-Rift, Kenya.

Methods: Blood samples were collected from pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in three district hospitals (Kitale, Kapsabet and Nandi Hills) after informed consent and pre-test counseling. The samples were tested for HIV antibodies as per the guidelines laid down by Ministry of Health, Kenya. A structured pretested questionnaire was used to obtain demographic data. Lymphocyte subset counts were quantified by standard flow cytometry.

Results: Of the 4638 pregnant women tested, 309 (6.7%) were HIV seropositive. The majority (85.1%) of the antenatal attendees did not know their HIV status prior to visiting the clinic for antenatal care. The highest proportion of HIV infected women was in the age group 21-25 years (35.5%). The 31-35 age group had the highest (8.5%) HIV prevalence, while women aged more than 35 years had the lowest (2.5%).Women in a polygamous relationship were significantly more likely to be HIV infected as compared to those in a monogamous relationship (p = 0.000). The highest HIV prevalence (6.3%) was recorded among antenatal attendees who had attended secondary schools followed by those with primary and tertiary level of education (6% and 5% respectively). However, there was no significant relationship between HIV seropositivity and the level of education (p = 0.653 and p = 0.469 for secondary and tertiary respectively). The mean CD4 count was 466 cells/mm3 (9-2000 cells/mm3). Those that had less than 200 cells/mm3 accounted for 14% and only nine were on antiretroviral therapy.

Conclusion: Seroprevalence of HIV was found to be consistent with the reports from the national HIV sentinel surveys. Enumeration of T-lymphocyte (CD4/8) should be carried out routinely in the antenatal clinics for proper timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy among HIV infected pregnant women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

HIV Prevalence by age group.
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Figure 1: HIV Prevalence by age group.

Mentions: The age specific HIV prevalence among antenatal attendees was analysed and is shown in Figure 1. The 31–35 age group had the highest (8.5%) HIV prevalence, while women aged more than 35 years had the lowest prevalence (2.5%). Widowed antenatal attendees had higher (16.7%) HIV prevalence followed by polygamous, monogamous and single with 14.1%, 5.3% and 4.1% respectively (Figure 2).


Survey on prevalence and risk factors on HIV-1 among pregnant women in North-Rift, Kenya: a hospital based cross-sectional study conducted between 2005 and 2006.

Kiptoo M, Mpoke S, Ng'ang'a Z, Mueke J, Okoth F, Songok E - BMC Int Health Hum Rights (2009)

HIV Prevalence by age group.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2683791&req=5

Figure 1: HIV Prevalence by age group.
Mentions: The age specific HIV prevalence among antenatal attendees was analysed and is shown in Figure 1. The 31–35 age group had the highest (8.5%) HIV prevalence, while women aged more than 35 years had the lowest prevalence (2.5%). Widowed antenatal attendees had higher (16.7%) HIV prevalence followed by polygamous, monogamous and single with 14.1%, 5.3% and 4.1% respectively (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: The majority (85.1%) of the antenatal attendees did not know their HIV status prior to visiting the clinic for antenatal care.The 31-35 age group had the highest (8.5%) HIV prevalence, while women aged more than 35 years had the lowest (2.5%).Women in a polygamous relationship were significantly more likely to be HIV infected as compared to those in a monogamous relationship (p = 0.000).Seroprevalence of HIV was found to be consistent with the reports from the national HIV sentinel surveys.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Virus Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya. mkiptoo@kemri.org

ABSTRACT

Background: The HIV/AIDS epidemic in Kenya is a major public-health problem. Estimating the prevalence of HIV in pregnant women provides essential information for an effective implementation of HIV/AIDS control measures and monitoring of HIV spread within a country. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of HIV infection, risk factors for HIV/AIDS and immunologic (lymphocyte profile) characteristics among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in three district hospitals in North-Rift, Kenya.

Methods: Blood samples were collected from pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in three district hospitals (Kitale, Kapsabet and Nandi Hills) after informed consent and pre-test counseling. The samples were tested for HIV antibodies as per the guidelines laid down by Ministry of Health, Kenya. A structured pretested questionnaire was used to obtain demographic data. Lymphocyte subset counts were quantified by standard flow cytometry.

Results: Of the 4638 pregnant women tested, 309 (6.7%) were HIV seropositive. The majority (85.1%) of the antenatal attendees did not know their HIV status prior to visiting the clinic for antenatal care. The highest proportion of HIV infected women was in the age group 21-25 years (35.5%). The 31-35 age group had the highest (8.5%) HIV prevalence, while women aged more than 35 years had the lowest (2.5%).Women in a polygamous relationship were significantly more likely to be HIV infected as compared to those in a monogamous relationship (p = 0.000). The highest HIV prevalence (6.3%) was recorded among antenatal attendees who had attended secondary schools followed by those with primary and tertiary level of education (6% and 5% respectively). However, there was no significant relationship between HIV seropositivity and the level of education (p = 0.653 and p = 0.469 for secondary and tertiary respectively). The mean CD4 count was 466 cells/mm3 (9-2000 cells/mm3). Those that had less than 200 cells/mm3 accounted for 14% and only nine were on antiretroviral therapy.

Conclusion: Seroprevalence of HIV was found to be consistent with the reports from the national HIV sentinel surveys. Enumeration of T-lymphocyte (CD4/8) should be carried out routinely in the antenatal clinics for proper timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy among HIV infected pregnant women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus