Limits...
Psychoeducation: a basic psychotherapeutic intervention for patients with schizophrenia and their families.

Bäuml J, Froböse T, Kraemer S, Rentrop M, Pitschel-Walz G - Schizophr Bull (2006)

Bottom Line: Through this, patients and their relatives should be empowered to understand and accept the illness and cope with it in a successful manner.Psychoeducation looks to combine the factor of empowerment of the affected with scientifically founded treatment expertise in as efficient a manner as possible.A randomized multicenter study based in Munich showed that within a 2-year period such a program was related to a significant reduction in rehospitalization rates from 58% to 41% and also a shortening of intermittent days spent in hospital from 78 to 39 days.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Technical University of Munich, Ismaninger Strasse 22, D-81675 Munich, Germany. j.baeuml@lrz.tum.de.

ABSTRACT
Psychoeducation was originally conceived as a composite of numerous therapeutic elements within a complex family therapy intervention. Patients and their relatives were, by means of preliminary briefing concerning the illness, supposed to develop a fundamental understanding of the therapy and further be convinced to commit to more long-term involvement. Since the mid 1980s, psychoeducation in German-speaking countries has evolved into an independent therapeutic program with a focus on the didactically skillful communication of key information within the framework of a cognitive-behavioral approach. Through this, patients and their relatives should be empowered to understand and accept the illness and cope with it in a successful manner. Achievement of this basic-level competency is considered to constitute an "obligatory-exercise" program upon which additional "voluntary-exercise" programs such as individual behavioral therapy, self-assertiveness training, problem-solving training, communication training, and further family therapy interventions can be built. Psychoeducation looks to combine the factor of empowerment of the affected with scientifically founded treatment expertise in as efficient a manner as possible. A randomized multicenter study based in Munich showed that within a 2-year period such a program was related to a significant reduction in rehospitalization rates from 58% to 41% and also a shortening of intermittent days spent in hospital from 78 to 39 days. Psychoeducation, in the form of an obligatory-exercise program, should be made available to all patients suffering from a schizophrenic disorder and their families.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

PIP Study: Rehospitalization Rates in Percent After 1 Year (n = 163) and 2 Years (n = 153), *P < .05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2683741&req=5

fig1: PIP Study: Rehospitalization Rates in Percent After 1 Year (n = 163) and 2 Years (n = 153), *P < .05.

Mentions: The psychoeducational procedure described above was assessed within the framework of a multicenter study in the German-speaking realm.36 A total of 236 patients suffering from a psychosis from the group of schizophrenic disorders (DSM IV-R/ICD-9) and their relatives were included in the study; 125 patients took part in psychoeducational intervention groups and 111 patients together with their relatives were assigned to the control group. Assignment was carried out randomly. Patients and relatives each received 8 independent psychoeducational group sessions starting during the stay of the patient in a medical institution. Rehospitalization rates (see figure 1) and days in hospital (see figure 2) after 2 years were significantly reduced in the intervention group. It was thus possible to show that a short-term psychoeducational intervention including patients and their closest relatives can have a significant effect on rehospitalization rates and the number of days spent in hospital.


Psychoeducation: a basic psychotherapeutic intervention for patients with schizophrenia and their families.

Bäuml J, Froböse T, Kraemer S, Rentrop M, Pitschel-Walz G - Schizophr Bull (2006)

PIP Study: Rehospitalization Rates in Percent After 1 Year (n = 163) and 2 Years (n = 153), *P < .05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2683741&req=5

fig1: PIP Study: Rehospitalization Rates in Percent After 1 Year (n = 163) and 2 Years (n = 153), *P < .05.
Mentions: The psychoeducational procedure described above was assessed within the framework of a multicenter study in the German-speaking realm.36 A total of 236 patients suffering from a psychosis from the group of schizophrenic disorders (DSM IV-R/ICD-9) and their relatives were included in the study; 125 patients took part in psychoeducational intervention groups and 111 patients together with their relatives were assigned to the control group. Assignment was carried out randomly. Patients and relatives each received 8 independent psychoeducational group sessions starting during the stay of the patient in a medical institution. Rehospitalization rates (see figure 1) and days in hospital (see figure 2) after 2 years were significantly reduced in the intervention group. It was thus possible to show that a short-term psychoeducational intervention including patients and their closest relatives can have a significant effect on rehospitalization rates and the number of days spent in hospital.

Bottom Line: Through this, patients and their relatives should be empowered to understand and accept the illness and cope with it in a successful manner.Psychoeducation looks to combine the factor of empowerment of the affected with scientifically founded treatment expertise in as efficient a manner as possible.A randomized multicenter study based in Munich showed that within a 2-year period such a program was related to a significant reduction in rehospitalization rates from 58% to 41% and also a shortening of intermittent days spent in hospital from 78 to 39 days.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Technical University of Munich, Ismaninger Strasse 22, D-81675 Munich, Germany. j.baeuml@lrz.tum.de.

ABSTRACT
Psychoeducation was originally conceived as a composite of numerous therapeutic elements within a complex family therapy intervention. Patients and their relatives were, by means of preliminary briefing concerning the illness, supposed to develop a fundamental understanding of the therapy and further be convinced to commit to more long-term involvement. Since the mid 1980s, psychoeducation in German-speaking countries has evolved into an independent therapeutic program with a focus on the didactically skillful communication of key information within the framework of a cognitive-behavioral approach. Through this, patients and their relatives should be empowered to understand and accept the illness and cope with it in a successful manner. Achievement of this basic-level competency is considered to constitute an "obligatory-exercise" program upon which additional "voluntary-exercise" programs such as individual behavioral therapy, self-assertiveness training, problem-solving training, communication training, and further family therapy interventions can be built. Psychoeducation looks to combine the factor of empowerment of the affected with scientifically founded treatment expertise in as efficient a manner as possible. A randomized multicenter study based in Munich showed that within a 2-year period such a program was related to a significant reduction in rehospitalization rates from 58% to 41% and also a shortening of intermittent days spent in hospital from 78 to 39 days. Psychoeducation, in the form of an obligatory-exercise program, should be made available to all patients suffering from a schizophrenic disorder and their families.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus