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Converting from ECCE to SICS.

Astbury N - Community Eye Health (2009)

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Affiliation: Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust, Colney Lane, Norwich NR4 7UY, UK.

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It is therefore more appropriate for tackling cataract in low- and middle-income countries... In developing countries, most surgeons are skilled in ECCE and would benefit from training to convert to SICS (see box)... The availability of surgical training for SICS is becoming an increasingly important factor: indeed, ‘phaco’ surgeons have become more sophisticated in a technique that is inappropriate for tackling cataract on a global scale, and they are not best placed to teach small incision non-phaco techniques... Increasingly, the focus of expertise in manual SICS is to be found in India, Pakistan, Nepal, Africa, or Latin America... Chiriboga stressed the importance of using two different pre-choppers: a sharp one for harder nuclei and one with a wider point for softer cataracts... A ‘fish-hook’ made from a 30G needle (Figure 2) has now become well known as a cheap, reusable, and very effective instrument with which to remove the lens nucleus... RD Ravindran from Aravind Eye Hospital, in Pondicherry, presented a SICS technique using an irrigating vectis, which will be described in more detail in the next section... Ravindran outlined some of the barriers to the conversion to SICS: lack of available training programmes reluctance of surgeons to change their technique increased difficulty for those who have not mastered ECCE beforehand... Ravindran presented a scheme for converting to SICS by learning its steps in stages during the ECCE surgery. involves prolapsing the nucleus into the anterior chamber using a Sinskey hook, through a can-opener capsulotomy, and removing the nucleus with a vectis. involves vectis extraction through progressively smaller ECCE incisions, until an 8 mm sutured incision is achieved. a sutured limbal tunnel is created with a crescent blade and keratome, the starting point being an 8 mm incision parallel to the limbus and 1 mm from clear cornea, which is then closed with three sutures after nucleus extraction using an irrigating vectis. is making a frown incision and tunnel (Figure 3)... After aspirating the cortex and checking the wound for retained material, the IOL is implanted... Ravindran concluded that, with supervised stepwise conversion from ECCE and careful case selection, the transition to SICS is achievable with minimal complications... The box above offers useful tips for a successful conversion.

No MeSH data available.


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Converting from ECCE to SICS.

Astbury N - Community Eye Health (2009)

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2683554&req=5

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust, Colney Lane, Norwich NR4 7UY, UK.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

It is therefore more appropriate for tackling cataract in low- and middle-income countries... In developing countries, most surgeons are skilled in ECCE and would benefit from training to convert to SICS (see box)... The availability of surgical training for SICS is becoming an increasingly important factor: indeed, ‘phaco’ surgeons have become more sophisticated in a technique that is inappropriate for tackling cataract on a global scale, and they are not best placed to teach small incision non-phaco techniques... Increasingly, the focus of expertise in manual SICS is to be found in India, Pakistan, Nepal, Africa, or Latin America... Chiriboga stressed the importance of using two different pre-choppers: a sharp one for harder nuclei and one with a wider point for softer cataracts... A ‘fish-hook’ made from a 30G needle (Figure 2) has now become well known as a cheap, reusable, and very effective instrument with which to remove the lens nucleus... RD Ravindran from Aravind Eye Hospital, in Pondicherry, presented a SICS technique using an irrigating vectis, which will be described in more detail in the next section... Ravindran outlined some of the barriers to the conversion to SICS: lack of available training programmes reluctance of surgeons to change their technique increased difficulty for those who have not mastered ECCE beforehand... Ravindran presented a scheme for converting to SICS by learning its steps in stages during the ECCE surgery. involves prolapsing the nucleus into the anterior chamber using a Sinskey hook, through a can-opener capsulotomy, and removing the nucleus with a vectis. involves vectis extraction through progressively smaller ECCE incisions, until an 8 mm sutured incision is achieved. a sutured limbal tunnel is created with a crescent blade and keratome, the starting point being an 8 mm incision parallel to the limbus and 1 mm from clear cornea, which is then closed with three sutures after nucleus extraction using an irrigating vectis. is making a frown incision and tunnel (Figure 3)... After aspirating the cortex and checking the wound for retained material, the IOL is implanted... Ravindran concluded that, with supervised stepwise conversion from ECCE and careful case selection, the transition to SICS is achievable with minimal complications... The box above offers useful tips for a successful conversion.

No MeSH data available.