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Diverse genotypes of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) identified in infant blood infections in African childhood-KS and HIV/AIDS endemic region.

Kasolo FC, Spinks J, Bima H, Bates M, Gompels UA - J. Med. Virol. (2007)

Bottom Line: This current enlarged study analyses blood infections of 200 hospitalized infants (6-34 months age) with symptoms of fever as well as upper respiratory tract infection, diarrhoea, rash or rhinitis.KSHV and HIV viraemia and were prevalent in this group, 22% and 39%, respectively.This supports the interpretation that the acquisition of childhood KSHV infections and subsequent development of KS are due to additional co-factors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Virology Department, University Teaching Hospital, University of Zambia Medical School, Lusaka, Zambia.

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Nucleotide changes in the K12 region shows B genotypes identified in African regions. Reference genotypes are shown (A, AC, M, B1, and B2), including Ugandan reference sequences from adultKS biopsy materials, compared to the Zambian infant patients blood genotypes showing B1 and B2. The K12 segment is in the reverse complement orientation (coding) from the genomic sequence. The positions of nucleotide variation and reference sequences are as shown previously with position 1 as in [Poole et al., 1999; Kakoola et al., 2001] or 118,065 in the BC1 genomic sequence, or position 51 in Poole et al. [1999], (positions −22 is 30, and 64 is 115 in Poole et al. [1999];). K12ORF, Kaposin A, ends at position 147 as inPoole et al. [1999] and Kakoola et al. [2001] or 117,919 in the BC1 genome [Russo et al., 1996]. The PCR product was from 118,116–117, 469. Hyphens and dots indicate identical or deleted residues.
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fig03: Nucleotide changes in the K12 region shows B genotypes identified in African regions. Reference genotypes are shown (A, AC, M, B1, and B2), including Ugandan reference sequences from adultKS biopsy materials, compared to the Zambian infant patients blood genotypes showing B1 and B2. The K12 segment is in the reverse complement orientation (coding) from the genomic sequence. The positions of nucleotide variation and reference sequences are as shown previously with position 1 as in [Poole et al., 1999; Kakoola et al., 2001] or 118,065 in the BC1 genomic sequence, or position 51 in Poole et al. [1999], (positions −22 is 30, and 64 is 115 in Poole et al. [1999];). K12ORF, Kaposin A, ends at position 147 as inPoole et al. [1999] and Kakoola et al. [2001] or 117,919 in the BC1 genome [Russo et al., 1996]. The PCR product was from 118,116–117, 469. Hyphens and dots indicate identical or deleted residues.

Mentions: At the loci from the right hand of the genome K12 and K14.1/K15 genotypes were identified, using primers to amplify regions as characterized previously [Poole et al., 1999]. Previous studies showed divergence of nucleotide sequences of K12 at selected positions, mostly intergenic non–coding, and some used as representative genotypes (Fig. 3). There were 21 Zambian infant K12 genotypes identified and these clustered with K12 B1 and B2 genotypes, similar to sequences identified in adult KS biopsies in other parts of Africa as shown [Poole et al., 1999; Kakoola et al., 20017rsqb; (Fig. 3). The PCR based assay for the K14.1/15 distinguishes by size the P or M genotypes. The dominance of the K14.1/15 P genotype (17/18) is in agreement with previous studies showing predominance in Eastern African regions also in adult KS biopisies (Table I) [Lacoste et al., 2000]. For all sites analyzed some samples could not be detected by the primers used, suggesting further diversity.


Diverse genotypes of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) identified in infant blood infections in African childhood-KS and HIV/AIDS endemic region.

Kasolo FC, Spinks J, Bima H, Bates M, Gompels UA - J. Med. Virol. (2007)

Nucleotide changes in the K12 region shows B genotypes identified in African regions. Reference genotypes are shown (A, AC, M, B1, and B2), including Ugandan reference sequences from adultKS biopsy materials, compared to the Zambian infant patients blood genotypes showing B1 and B2. The K12 segment is in the reverse complement orientation (coding) from the genomic sequence. The positions of nucleotide variation and reference sequences are as shown previously with position 1 as in [Poole et al., 1999; Kakoola et al., 2001] or 118,065 in the BC1 genomic sequence, or position 51 in Poole et al. [1999], (positions −22 is 30, and 64 is 115 in Poole et al. [1999];). K12ORF, Kaposin A, ends at position 147 as inPoole et al. [1999] and Kakoola et al. [2001] or 117,919 in the BC1 genome [Russo et al., 1996]. The PCR product was from 118,116–117, 469. Hyphens and dots indicate identical or deleted residues.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2683451&req=5

fig03: Nucleotide changes in the K12 region shows B genotypes identified in African regions. Reference genotypes are shown (A, AC, M, B1, and B2), including Ugandan reference sequences from adultKS biopsy materials, compared to the Zambian infant patients blood genotypes showing B1 and B2. The K12 segment is in the reverse complement orientation (coding) from the genomic sequence. The positions of nucleotide variation and reference sequences are as shown previously with position 1 as in [Poole et al., 1999; Kakoola et al., 2001] or 118,065 in the BC1 genomic sequence, or position 51 in Poole et al. [1999], (positions −22 is 30, and 64 is 115 in Poole et al. [1999];). K12ORF, Kaposin A, ends at position 147 as inPoole et al. [1999] and Kakoola et al. [2001] or 117,919 in the BC1 genome [Russo et al., 1996]. The PCR product was from 118,116–117, 469. Hyphens and dots indicate identical or deleted residues.
Mentions: At the loci from the right hand of the genome K12 and K14.1/K15 genotypes were identified, using primers to amplify regions as characterized previously [Poole et al., 1999]. Previous studies showed divergence of nucleotide sequences of K12 at selected positions, mostly intergenic non–coding, and some used as representative genotypes (Fig. 3). There were 21 Zambian infant K12 genotypes identified and these clustered with K12 B1 and B2 genotypes, similar to sequences identified in adult KS biopsies in other parts of Africa as shown [Poole et al., 1999; Kakoola et al., 20017rsqb; (Fig. 3). The PCR based assay for the K14.1/15 distinguishes by size the P or M genotypes. The dominance of the K14.1/15 P genotype (17/18) is in agreement with previous studies showing predominance in Eastern African regions also in adult KS biopisies (Table I) [Lacoste et al., 2000]. For all sites analyzed some samples could not be detected by the primers used, suggesting further diversity.

Bottom Line: This current enlarged study analyses blood infections of 200 hospitalized infants (6-34 months age) with symptoms of fever as well as upper respiratory tract infection, diarrhoea, rash or rhinitis.KSHV and HIV viraemia and were prevalent in this group, 22% and 39%, respectively.This supports the interpretation that the acquisition of childhood KSHV infections and subsequent development of KS are due to additional co-factors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Virology Department, University Teaching Hospital, University of Zambia Medical School, Lusaka, Zambia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus