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The environment and physical activity: The influence of psychosocial, perceived and built environmental factors.

Maddison R, Hoorn SV, Jiang Y, Mhurchu CN, Exeter D, Dorey E, Bullen C, Utter J, Schaaf D, Turley M - Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act (2009)

Bottom Line: The model explained 13% of time spent in moderate and vigorous physical activity (Actigraph).Unique and individual contribution was made by intention.Implications of these findings are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Trials Research Unit, School of Population Health, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland. r.maddison@ctru.auckland.ac.nz.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: : This study sought to integrate perceived and built environmental and individual factors into the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) model to better understand adolescents' physical activity.

Methods: Participants (n = 110) aged 12 to 17 years (M = 14.6 +/- 1.55) were recruited from two large metropolitan high schools in Auckland, New Zealand, were included in the analysis. Participants completed measures of the revised TPB and the perceived environment. Individual factors such as ethnicity and level of deprivation were also collected. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) software was used to measure the physical environment (walkability, access to physical activity facilities). Physical activity was assessed using the ActiGraph accelerometer and the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents (PAQ-A). Data from the various sources were combined to develop an integrated model integrated for statistical analysis using structural equation modeling.

Results: The TPB model variables (intention and perceived behavioral control) explained 43% of the variance of PAQ-A. Unique and individual contributions were made by intention and PBC and home ownership of home equipment. The model explained 13% of time spent in moderate and vigorous physical activity (Actigraph). Unique and individual contribution was made by intention.

Conclusion: Social cognitive variables were better predictors of both subjective and objective physical activity compared to perceived environmental and built environment factors. Implications of these findings are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Integrated model to predict self-reported behavior (PAQ-A). Note: All effects are standardized. Bold lines indicated statistically significant relationships (p < 0.05).
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Figure 1: Integrated model to predict self-reported behavior (PAQ-A). Note: All effects are standardized. Bold lines indicated statistically significant relationships (p < 0.05).

Mentions: Structural equation modeling analysis with the PAQ-A as the dependant variable is presented in Model one (Figure 1). The model resulted in a modest fit of the data [Χ2 (28) = 82.98; p < 0.0001; CFI = 0.79; RMSEA = .13] using conventional cut-off criteria. Approximately 43% variance of subjective physical activity (PAQ-A) was explained. Intention (standardized effect = .51) and PBC (standardized effect = 0.14) had the strongest direct effects on subjective physical activity. Of the perceived variables, home ownership of recreation equipment (standardized effect = .26) had a direct effect on physical activity. Subjective norms and attitude were related to intention, while PBC was not. As can be seen in Figure 1, perceived ownership of home equipment had a direct relationship with all of the TPB variables except PBC, while reported use of home equipment had a direct effect with attitude. Ethnicity (standardized effect = -.34) was inversely related to perceived home ownership of recreational equipment.


The environment and physical activity: The influence of psychosocial, perceived and built environmental factors.

Maddison R, Hoorn SV, Jiang Y, Mhurchu CN, Exeter D, Dorey E, Bullen C, Utter J, Schaaf D, Turley M - Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act (2009)

Integrated model to predict self-reported behavior (PAQ-A). Note: All effects are standardized. Bold lines indicated statistically significant relationships (p < 0.05).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2683167&req=5

Figure 1: Integrated model to predict self-reported behavior (PAQ-A). Note: All effects are standardized. Bold lines indicated statistically significant relationships (p < 0.05).
Mentions: Structural equation modeling analysis with the PAQ-A as the dependant variable is presented in Model one (Figure 1). The model resulted in a modest fit of the data [Χ2 (28) = 82.98; p < 0.0001; CFI = 0.79; RMSEA = .13] using conventional cut-off criteria. Approximately 43% variance of subjective physical activity (PAQ-A) was explained. Intention (standardized effect = .51) and PBC (standardized effect = 0.14) had the strongest direct effects on subjective physical activity. Of the perceived variables, home ownership of recreation equipment (standardized effect = .26) had a direct effect on physical activity. Subjective norms and attitude were related to intention, while PBC was not. As can be seen in Figure 1, perceived ownership of home equipment had a direct relationship with all of the TPB variables except PBC, while reported use of home equipment had a direct effect with attitude. Ethnicity (standardized effect = -.34) was inversely related to perceived home ownership of recreational equipment.

Bottom Line: The model explained 13% of time spent in moderate and vigorous physical activity (Actigraph).Unique and individual contribution was made by intention.Implications of these findings are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Trials Research Unit, School of Population Health, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland. r.maddison@ctru.auckland.ac.nz.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: : This study sought to integrate perceived and built environmental and individual factors into the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) model to better understand adolescents' physical activity.

Methods: Participants (n = 110) aged 12 to 17 years (M = 14.6 +/- 1.55) were recruited from two large metropolitan high schools in Auckland, New Zealand, were included in the analysis. Participants completed measures of the revised TPB and the perceived environment. Individual factors such as ethnicity and level of deprivation were also collected. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) software was used to measure the physical environment (walkability, access to physical activity facilities). Physical activity was assessed using the ActiGraph accelerometer and the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents (PAQ-A). Data from the various sources were combined to develop an integrated model integrated for statistical analysis using structural equation modeling.

Results: The TPB model variables (intention and perceived behavioral control) explained 43% of the variance of PAQ-A. Unique and individual contributions were made by intention and PBC and home ownership of home equipment. The model explained 13% of time spent in moderate and vigorous physical activity (Actigraph). Unique and individual contribution was made by intention.

Conclusion: Social cognitive variables were better predictors of both subjective and objective physical activity compared to perceived environmental and built environment factors. Implications of these findings are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus