Limits...
Modeling kinetics of subcellular disposition of chemicals.

Balaz S - Chem. Rev. (2009)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota 58105, USA. stefan.balaz@ndsu.edu

Show MeSH
Fractions of the chemicals in the core region, as predicted from the C16/DAcPC partitioning, versus the difference between C16/W and C16/O partition coefficients. The compounds with experimentally determined locale are shown as full points. The sigmoidal curve connects the compounds with known locales in the headgroups or the core and corresponds to eq 2.(552)
© Copyright Policy - open-access - ccc-price
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2682929&req=5

fig6: Fractions of the chemicals in the core region, as predicted from the C16/DAcPC partitioning, versus the difference between C16/W and C16/O partition coefficients. The compounds with experimentally determined locale are shown as full points. The sigmoidal curve connects the compounds with known locales in the headgroups or the core and corresponds to eq 2.(552)

Mentions: The DAcPC molecules do not measurably partition from the concentrated aqueous solution (1.96 mol/L) into n-hexadecane (C16) in the two-phase system. For a set of 16 compounds, the C16/DAcPC partition coefficients were measured and used to estimate the prevalent location of the compounds in the bilayer. The difference logPC16/W − logPO/W (formally equal to logPC16/O) is frequently considered to be an indicator of the hydrogen-bonding ability,549,550,554,555 a correlate for permeability,(556) and a parameter characterizing the preferential location of solutes in the bilayer. The fraction of compounds present in the core, as estimated from the C16/DAcPC partition coefficients, is plotted against log PC16/O in Figure 6. To connect the compounds with known locale in the headgroups or in the core, the data were fitted(557) with the Boltzmann sigmoidal function:(552)


Modeling kinetics of subcellular disposition of chemicals.

Balaz S - Chem. Rev. (2009)

Fractions of the chemicals in the core region, as predicted from the C16/DAcPC partitioning, versus the difference between C16/W and C16/O partition coefficients. The compounds with experimentally determined locale are shown as full points. The sigmoidal curve connects the compounds with known locales in the headgroups or the core and corresponds to eq 2.(552)
© Copyright Policy - open-access - ccc-price
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2682929&req=5

fig6: Fractions of the chemicals in the core region, as predicted from the C16/DAcPC partitioning, versus the difference between C16/W and C16/O partition coefficients. The compounds with experimentally determined locale are shown as full points. The sigmoidal curve connects the compounds with known locales in the headgroups or the core and corresponds to eq 2.(552)
Mentions: The DAcPC molecules do not measurably partition from the concentrated aqueous solution (1.96 mol/L) into n-hexadecane (C16) in the two-phase system. For a set of 16 compounds, the C16/DAcPC partition coefficients were measured and used to estimate the prevalent location of the compounds in the bilayer. The difference logPC16/W − logPO/W (formally equal to logPC16/O) is frequently considered to be an indicator of the hydrogen-bonding ability,549,550,554,555 a correlate for permeability,(556) and a parameter characterizing the preferential location of solutes in the bilayer. The fraction of compounds present in the core, as estimated from the C16/DAcPC partition coefficients, is plotted against log PC16/O in Figure 6. To connect the compounds with known locale in the headgroups or in the core, the data were fitted(557) with the Boltzmann sigmoidal function:(552)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota 58105, USA. stefan.balaz@ndsu.edu

Show MeSH