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An investigation into the cognitive deficits associated with chronic fatigue syndrome.

Thomas M, Smith A - Open Neurol J (2009)

Bottom Line: In doing so this study was able to replicate previous published evidence of clear cognitive impairment in this group and demonstrate also that these deficits occurred independent of psychopathology.The conclusion drawn is that cognitive impairments can be identified if appropriate measures are used.Furthermore, the authors have shown that performance changes in these measures have been used to assess both efficacy of a treatment regime and rates of recovery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Occupational and Health Psychology, School of Psychology, Cardiff University, UK.

ABSTRACT
This study addresses, among other things, the debate as to whether cognitive deficits do occur with a diagnosis of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). Previous studies have indicated a potential mismatch between subjective patient ratings of impairment and clinical assessment. In an attempt to tackle some of the methodological problems faced by previous research in this field, this study recruited a large sample of CFS patients where adequate diagnosis had been made and administered an extensive battery of measures. In doing so this study was able to replicate previous published evidence of clear cognitive impairment in this group and demonstrate also that these deficits occurred independent of psychopathology. The conclusion drawn is that cognitive impairments can be identified if appropriate measures are used. Furthermore, the authors have shown that performance changes in these measures have been used to assess both efficacy of a treatment regime and rates of recovery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Time on task scores for three minutes of the simple reaction time task measure for the CFS and control groups. Scores are the mean with s.e.m shown as bars. Higher RT scores=slower reaction times.
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Figure 2: Time on task scores for three minutes of the simple reaction time task measure for the CFS and control groups. Scores are the mean with s.e.m shown as bars. Higher RT scores=slower reaction times.

Mentions: Data describing the time-on-task reaction times over the 3 minutes (that is the RT for each minute of the task) suggests that there is a linear group effect for reaction times (F(1,429)=67.20, p<0.001) indicating that both groups’ reaction times slow gradually over the three minutes. CFS patients had slower reaction times on each minute of the task (time on task), and the repeated measures analysis indicated that the CFS groups’ reaction time slowed at a greater rate (F(1,858)=3.03, p<0.05) than the controls (i.e. they become fatigued more quickly than the controls – see Fig. 2).


An investigation into the cognitive deficits associated with chronic fatigue syndrome.

Thomas M, Smith A - Open Neurol J (2009)

Time on task scores for three minutes of the simple reaction time task measure for the CFS and control groups. Scores are the mean with s.e.m shown as bars. Higher RT scores=slower reaction times.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2682840&req=5

Figure 2: Time on task scores for three minutes of the simple reaction time task measure for the CFS and control groups. Scores are the mean with s.e.m shown as bars. Higher RT scores=slower reaction times.
Mentions: Data describing the time-on-task reaction times over the 3 minutes (that is the RT for each minute of the task) suggests that there is a linear group effect for reaction times (F(1,429)=67.20, p<0.001) indicating that both groups’ reaction times slow gradually over the three minutes. CFS patients had slower reaction times on each minute of the task (time on task), and the repeated measures analysis indicated that the CFS groups’ reaction time slowed at a greater rate (F(1,858)=3.03, p<0.05) than the controls (i.e. they become fatigued more quickly than the controls – see Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: In doing so this study was able to replicate previous published evidence of clear cognitive impairment in this group and demonstrate also that these deficits occurred independent of psychopathology.The conclusion drawn is that cognitive impairments can be identified if appropriate measures are used.Furthermore, the authors have shown that performance changes in these measures have been used to assess both efficacy of a treatment regime and rates of recovery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Occupational and Health Psychology, School of Psychology, Cardiff University, UK.

ABSTRACT
This study addresses, among other things, the debate as to whether cognitive deficits do occur with a diagnosis of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). Previous studies have indicated a potential mismatch between subjective patient ratings of impairment and clinical assessment. In an attempt to tackle some of the methodological problems faced by previous research in this field, this study recruited a large sample of CFS patients where adequate diagnosis had been made and administered an extensive battery of measures. In doing so this study was able to replicate previous published evidence of clear cognitive impairment in this group and demonstrate also that these deficits occurred independent of psychopathology. The conclusion drawn is that cognitive impairments can be identified if appropriate measures are used. Furthermore, the authors have shown that performance changes in these measures have been used to assess both efficacy of a treatment regime and rates of recovery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus