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A translational framework for public health research.

Ogilvie D, Craig P, Griffin S, Macintyre S, Wareham NJ - BMC Public Health (2009)

Bottom Line: The paradigm of translational medicine that underpins frameworks such as the Cooksey report on the funding of health research does not adequately reflect the complex reality of the public health environment.It also identifies a pivotal role for evidence synthesis and the importance of non-linear and intersectoral interfaces with the public realm.We propose a research agenda to advance the field and argue that resources for 'applied' or 'translational' public health research should be deployed across the framework, not reserved for 'dissemination' or 'implementation'.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit and Centre for Diet and Activity Research, Cambridge, UK. david.ogilvie@mrc-epid.cam.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: The paradigm of translational medicine that underpins frameworks such as the Cooksey report on the funding of health research does not adequately reflect the complex reality of the public health environment. We therefore outline a translational framework for public health research.

Discussion: Our framework redefines the objective of translation from that of institutionalising effective interventions to that of improving population health by influencing both individual and collective determinants of health. It incorporates epidemiological perspectives with those of the social sciences, recognising that many types of research may contribute to the shaping of policy, practice and future research. It also identifies a pivotal role for evidence synthesis and the importance of non-linear and intersectoral interfaces with the public realm.

Summary: We propose a research agenda to advance the field and argue that resources for 'applied' or 'translational' public health research should be deployed across the framework, not reserved for 'dissemination' or 'implementation'.

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Pathway for translation of health research into healthcare improvement. Source: A review of UK health research funding (the Cooksey report) [5]. © Crown copyright 2006. Reproduced with permission.Blue boxes below parts of pathway correspond to specific responsibilities of public sector bodies supporting research. MRC: Medical Research Council. NHS R&D: National Health Service Research and Development. NHS HTA: NHS Health Technology Assessment Programme. NHS SDO: Service and Delivery Organisation research programme. NHS CfH: Connecting for Health. Light blue boxes below parts of pathway correspond to the specific responsibilites of statutory regulatory agencies. MHRA: Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency. NICE: National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence.
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Figure 1: Pathway for translation of health research into healthcare improvement. Source: A review of UK health research funding (the Cooksey report) [5]. © Crown copyright 2006. Reproduced with permission.Blue boxes below parts of pathway correspond to specific responsibilities of public sector bodies supporting research. MRC: Medical Research Council. NHS R&D: National Health Service Research and Development. NHS HTA: NHS Health Technology Assessment Programme. NHS SDO: Service and Delivery Organisation research programme. NHS CfH: Connecting for Health. Light blue boxes below parts of pathway correspond to the specific responsibilites of statutory regulatory agencies. MHRA: Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency. NICE: National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence.

Mentions: The report describes a 'pathway for translation of health research into healthcare improvement' and identifies two principal gaps in that pathway: 'the translation of basic and clinical research into ideas and products', and 'introducing those ideas and products into clinical practice' (Figure 1). Bridging the first gap (sometimes labelled as T1) [1] involves preclinical development and early clinical trials, whereas bridging the second (T2) involves health technology assessment, health services research and knowledge management [5]. Like the influential 'roadmap' developed by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the United States [8], the pathway described is clearly based on the process of drug development, whose aims are to turn the findings of 'basic science' into a new drug and to incorporate the use of the new drug into routine clinical practice for the benefit of individual patients [9,10].


A translational framework for public health research.

Ogilvie D, Craig P, Griffin S, Macintyre S, Wareham NJ - BMC Public Health (2009)

Pathway for translation of health research into healthcare improvement. Source: A review of UK health research funding (the Cooksey report) [5]. © Crown copyright 2006. Reproduced with permission.Blue boxes below parts of pathway correspond to specific responsibilities of public sector bodies supporting research. MRC: Medical Research Council. NHS R&D: National Health Service Research and Development. NHS HTA: NHS Health Technology Assessment Programme. NHS SDO: Service and Delivery Organisation research programme. NHS CfH: Connecting for Health. Light blue boxes below parts of pathway correspond to the specific responsibilites of statutory regulatory agencies. MHRA: Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency. NICE: National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2681470&req=5

Figure 1: Pathway for translation of health research into healthcare improvement. Source: A review of UK health research funding (the Cooksey report) [5]. © Crown copyright 2006. Reproduced with permission.Blue boxes below parts of pathway correspond to specific responsibilities of public sector bodies supporting research. MRC: Medical Research Council. NHS R&D: National Health Service Research and Development. NHS HTA: NHS Health Technology Assessment Programme. NHS SDO: Service and Delivery Organisation research programme. NHS CfH: Connecting for Health. Light blue boxes below parts of pathway correspond to the specific responsibilites of statutory regulatory agencies. MHRA: Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency. NICE: National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence.
Mentions: The report describes a 'pathway for translation of health research into healthcare improvement' and identifies two principal gaps in that pathway: 'the translation of basic and clinical research into ideas and products', and 'introducing those ideas and products into clinical practice' (Figure 1). Bridging the first gap (sometimes labelled as T1) [1] involves preclinical development and early clinical trials, whereas bridging the second (T2) involves health technology assessment, health services research and knowledge management [5]. Like the influential 'roadmap' developed by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the United States [8], the pathway described is clearly based on the process of drug development, whose aims are to turn the findings of 'basic science' into a new drug and to incorporate the use of the new drug into routine clinical practice for the benefit of individual patients [9,10].

Bottom Line: The paradigm of translational medicine that underpins frameworks such as the Cooksey report on the funding of health research does not adequately reflect the complex reality of the public health environment.It also identifies a pivotal role for evidence synthesis and the importance of non-linear and intersectoral interfaces with the public realm.We propose a research agenda to advance the field and argue that resources for 'applied' or 'translational' public health research should be deployed across the framework, not reserved for 'dissemination' or 'implementation'.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit and Centre for Diet and Activity Research, Cambridge, UK. david.ogilvie@mrc-epid.cam.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: The paradigm of translational medicine that underpins frameworks such as the Cooksey report on the funding of health research does not adequately reflect the complex reality of the public health environment. We therefore outline a translational framework for public health research.

Discussion: Our framework redefines the objective of translation from that of institutionalising effective interventions to that of improving population health by influencing both individual and collective determinants of health. It incorporates epidemiological perspectives with those of the social sciences, recognising that many types of research may contribute to the shaping of policy, practice and future research. It also identifies a pivotal role for evidence synthesis and the importance of non-linear and intersectoral interfaces with the public realm.

Summary: We propose a research agenda to advance the field and argue that resources for 'applied' or 'translational' public health research should be deployed across the framework, not reserved for 'dissemination' or 'implementation'.

Show MeSH