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My approach to interstitial lung disease using clinical, radiological and histopathological patterns.

Leslie KO - J. Clin. Pathol. (2009)

Bottom Line: The complex world of interstitial lung disease presents nearly insurmountable challenges to the general surgical pathologist faced with a lung biopsy in this setting.The pathology is often inflammatory and always requires clinical and radiological context for a relevant and clinically useful histopathological diagnosis.A pattern-based histopathological approach to interstitial lung disease provides a "map" for the general pathologist to navigate this area successfully, especially so when used with aid of the clinical and radiological patterns of presentation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Anatomic Pathology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ 85259, USA. leslie.kevin@mayo.edu

ABSTRACT
The complex world of interstitial lung disease presents nearly insurmountable challenges to the general surgical pathologist faced with a lung biopsy in this setting. The pathology is often inflammatory and always requires clinical and radiological context for a relevant and clinically useful histopathological diagnosis. A pattern-based histopathological approach to interstitial lung disease provides a "map" for the general pathologist to navigate this area successfully, especially so when used with aid of the clinical and radiological patterns of presentation.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP). Idiopathic DIP is characterised by dense alveolar macrophages. Many conditions can result in localised alveolar macrophage accumulation. Inset: alveolar macrophage detail. H&E stain, 40× original magnification (inset, 400× original magnification).
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CPT-62-05-0387-f21: Desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP). Idiopathic DIP is characterised by dense alveolar macrophages. Many conditions can result in localised alveolar macrophage accumulation. Inset: alveolar macrophage detail. H&E stain, 40× original magnification (inset, 400× original magnification).

Mentions: A DIP-like pattern is characterised by increased numbers of alveolar macrophages, with mild associated inflammatory changes in alveolar walls (fig 21). Lesions that may show a DIP pattern (in some cases focally) are presented in box 6.


My approach to interstitial lung disease using clinical, radiological and histopathological patterns.

Leslie KO - J. Clin. Pathol. (2009)

Desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP). Idiopathic DIP is characterised by dense alveolar macrophages. Many conditions can result in localised alveolar macrophage accumulation. Inset: alveolar macrophage detail. H&E stain, 40× original magnification (inset, 400× original magnification).
© Copyright Policy - openaccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2668105&req=5

CPT-62-05-0387-f21: Desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP). Idiopathic DIP is characterised by dense alveolar macrophages. Many conditions can result in localised alveolar macrophage accumulation. Inset: alveolar macrophage detail. H&E stain, 40× original magnification (inset, 400× original magnification).
Mentions: A DIP-like pattern is characterised by increased numbers of alveolar macrophages, with mild associated inflammatory changes in alveolar walls (fig 21). Lesions that may show a DIP pattern (in some cases focally) are presented in box 6.

Bottom Line: The complex world of interstitial lung disease presents nearly insurmountable challenges to the general surgical pathologist faced with a lung biopsy in this setting.The pathology is often inflammatory and always requires clinical and radiological context for a relevant and clinically useful histopathological diagnosis.A pattern-based histopathological approach to interstitial lung disease provides a "map" for the general pathologist to navigate this area successfully, especially so when used with aid of the clinical and radiological patterns of presentation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Anatomic Pathology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ 85259, USA. leslie.kevin@mayo.edu

ABSTRACT
The complex world of interstitial lung disease presents nearly insurmountable challenges to the general surgical pathologist faced with a lung biopsy in this setting. The pathology is often inflammatory and always requires clinical and radiological context for a relevant and clinically useful histopathological diagnosis. A pattern-based histopathological approach to interstitial lung disease provides a "map" for the general pathologist to navigate this area successfully, especially so when used with aid of the clinical and radiological patterns of presentation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus