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My approach to interstitial lung disease using clinical, radiological and histopathological patterns.

Leslie KO - J. Clin. Pathol. (2009)

Bottom Line: The complex world of interstitial lung disease presents nearly insurmountable challenges to the general surgical pathologist faced with a lung biopsy in this setting.The pathology is often inflammatory and always requires clinical and radiological context for a relevant and clinically useful histopathological diagnosis.A pattern-based histopathological approach to interstitial lung disease provides a "map" for the general pathologist to navigate this area successfully, especially so when used with aid of the clinical and radiological patterns of presentation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Anatomic Pathology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ 85259, USA. leslie.kevin@mayo.edu

ABSTRACT
The complex world of interstitial lung disease presents nearly insurmountable challenges to the general surgical pathologist faced with a lung biopsy in this setting. The pathology is often inflammatory and always requires clinical and radiological context for a relevant and clinically useful histopathological diagnosis. A pattern-based histopathological approach to interstitial lung disease provides a "map" for the general pathologist to navigate this area successfully, especially so when used with aid of the clinical and radiological patterns of presentation.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Pattern 4: alveolar filling. This example of diffuse alveolar haemorrhage nicely demonstrates the concept of alveolar filling. In cases of inflammatory reaction to injury, initial interstitial changes typically evolve to alveolar filling disease (eg, acute bronchopneumonia, organising pneumonia). H&E stain, 15× original magnification.
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CPT-62-05-0387-f19: Pattern 4: alveolar filling. This example of diffuse alveolar haemorrhage nicely demonstrates the concept of alveolar filling. In cases of inflammatory reaction to injury, initial interstitial changes typically evolve to alveolar filling disease (eg, acute bronchopneumonia, organising pneumonia). H&E stain, 15× original magnification.

Mentions: Basic elements of the pattern: alveoli in the biopsy specimen filled with cells or non-cellular material (fig 19).


My approach to interstitial lung disease using clinical, radiological and histopathological patterns.

Leslie KO - J. Clin. Pathol. (2009)

Pattern 4: alveolar filling. This example of diffuse alveolar haemorrhage nicely demonstrates the concept of alveolar filling. In cases of inflammatory reaction to injury, initial interstitial changes typically evolve to alveolar filling disease (eg, acute bronchopneumonia, organising pneumonia). H&E stain, 15× original magnification.
© Copyright Policy - openaccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2668105&req=5

CPT-62-05-0387-f19: Pattern 4: alveolar filling. This example of diffuse alveolar haemorrhage nicely demonstrates the concept of alveolar filling. In cases of inflammatory reaction to injury, initial interstitial changes typically evolve to alveolar filling disease (eg, acute bronchopneumonia, organising pneumonia). H&E stain, 15× original magnification.
Mentions: Basic elements of the pattern: alveoli in the biopsy specimen filled with cells or non-cellular material (fig 19).

Bottom Line: The complex world of interstitial lung disease presents nearly insurmountable challenges to the general surgical pathologist faced with a lung biopsy in this setting.The pathology is often inflammatory and always requires clinical and radiological context for a relevant and clinically useful histopathological diagnosis.A pattern-based histopathological approach to interstitial lung disease provides a "map" for the general pathologist to navigate this area successfully, especially so when used with aid of the clinical and radiological patterns of presentation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Anatomic Pathology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ 85259, USA. leslie.kevin@mayo.edu

ABSTRACT
The complex world of interstitial lung disease presents nearly insurmountable challenges to the general surgical pathologist faced with a lung biopsy in this setting. The pathology is often inflammatory and always requires clinical and radiological context for a relevant and clinically useful histopathological diagnosis. A pattern-based histopathological approach to interstitial lung disease provides a "map" for the general pathologist to navigate this area successfully, especially so when used with aid of the clinical and radiological patterns of presentation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus