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Frailty and type of death among older adults in China: prospective cohort study.

Dupre ME, Gu D, Warner DF, Yi Z - BMJ (2009)

Bottom Line: Multinomial analyses showed that higher levels of frailty significantly increased the relative risk ratios of mortality for all types of death.Adjusting for compositional differences had little impact on the link between frailty and type of death for both sexes and age groups.The association between frailty and type of death differs by sex and age.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sociology and Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA. med11@geri.duke.edu

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine the association between frailty and type of death among the world's largest oldest-old population in China.

Design: Prospective cohort study.

Setting: 2002 and 2005 waves of the Chinese longitudinal healthy longevity survey carried out in 22 provinces throughout China.

Participants: 13 717 older adults (aged >or=65).

Main outcome measures: Type of death, categorised as being bedridden for fewer than 30 days with or without suffering and being bedridden for 30 or more days with or without suffering.

Results: Multinomial analyses showed that higher levels of frailty significantly increased the relative risk ratios of mortality for all types of death. Of those with the highest levels of frailty, men were most likely to experience 30 or more bedridden days with suffering before death (relative risk ratio 8.70, 95% confidence interval 6.31 to 12.00) and women 30 or more bedridden days with no suffering (11.53, 17.84 to 16.96). Regardless of frailty, centenarians and nonagenarians were most likely to experience fewer than 30 bedridden days with no suffering, whereas those aged 65-79 and 80-89 were more likely to experience fewer than 30 bedridden days with suffering. Adjusting for compositional differences had little impact on the link between frailty and type of death for both sexes and age groups.

Conclusions: The association between frailty and type of death differs by sex and age. Health scholars and clinical practitioners should consider age and sex differences in frailty to develop more effective measures to reduce preventable suffering before death.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Fig 1 Observed proportion of type of death among deceased sample by age and sex in 2002 and 2005 waves of Chinese longitudinal healthy longevity survey
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fig1: Fig 1 Observed proportion of type of death among deceased sample by age and sex in 2002 and 2005 waves of Chinese longitudinal healthy longevity survey

Mentions: For both sexes the proportion of participants who did not suffer before death increased with age and the proportion who suffered decreased with age (figs 1 and 2). Across levels of frailty, the most pronounced patterns were the precipitous declines in the numbers of participants who experienced fewer than 30 bedridden days with suffering and increases in the number of participants who experienced 30 or more bedridden days with no suffering, particularly among women. Consistent with tables 1 and 2, the plotted probabilities also indicated that women were more likely to experience no suffering before death compared with men.


Frailty and type of death among older adults in China: prospective cohort study.

Dupre ME, Gu D, Warner DF, Yi Z - BMJ (2009)

Fig 1 Observed proportion of type of death among deceased sample by age and sex in 2002 and 2005 waves of Chinese longitudinal healthy longevity survey
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2667569&req=5

fig1: Fig 1 Observed proportion of type of death among deceased sample by age and sex in 2002 and 2005 waves of Chinese longitudinal healthy longevity survey
Mentions: For both sexes the proportion of participants who did not suffer before death increased with age and the proportion who suffered decreased with age (figs 1 and 2). Across levels of frailty, the most pronounced patterns were the precipitous declines in the numbers of participants who experienced fewer than 30 bedridden days with suffering and increases in the number of participants who experienced 30 or more bedridden days with no suffering, particularly among women. Consistent with tables 1 and 2, the plotted probabilities also indicated that women were more likely to experience no suffering before death compared with men.

Bottom Line: Multinomial analyses showed that higher levels of frailty significantly increased the relative risk ratios of mortality for all types of death.Adjusting for compositional differences had little impact on the link between frailty and type of death for both sexes and age groups.The association between frailty and type of death differs by sex and age.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sociology and Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA. med11@geri.duke.edu

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine the association between frailty and type of death among the world's largest oldest-old population in China.

Design: Prospective cohort study.

Setting: 2002 and 2005 waves of the Chinese longitudinal healthy longevity survey carried out in 22 provinces throughout China.

Participants: 13 717 older adults (aged >or=65).

Main outcome measures: Type of death, categorised as being bedridden for fewer than 30 days with or without suffering and being bedridden for 30 or more days with or without suffering.

Results: Multinomial analyses showed that higher levels of frailty significantly increased the relative risk ratios of mortality for all types of death. Of those with the highest levels of frailty, men were most likely to experience 30 or more bedridden days with suffering before death (relative risk ratio 8.70, 95% confidence interval 6.31 to 12.00) and women 30 or more bedridden days with no suffering (11.53, 17.84 to 16.96). Regardless of frailty, centenarians and nonagenarians were most likely to experience fewer than 30 bedridden days with no suffering, whereas those aged 65-79 and 80-89 were more likely to experience fewer than 30 bedridden days with suffering. Adjusting for compositional differences had little impact on the link between frailty and type of death for both sexes and age groups.

Conclusions: The association between frailty and type of death differs by sex and age. Health scholars and clinical practitioners should consider age and sex differences in frailty to develop more effective measures to reduce preventable suffering before death.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus