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Rapid scale-up of antiretroviral treatment in Ethiopia: successes and system-wide effects.

Assefa Y, Jerene D, Lulseged S, Ooms G, Van Damme W - PLoS Med. (2009)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Programs Department, National HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control Office, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. yibeltalassefa343@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

There has been substantial expansion of access to ART and HIV counseling and testing in Ethiopia, whilst maintaining the performance of other health programs such as tuberculosis and maternal and child health services.

Task shifting to the health officers, nurses, and health extension workers is thought to be responsible for these successes.

However, HIV prevention interventions and management of chronic care patients are lagging behind. This may be due to lack of attention to these health care areas and to physicians leaving the public sector for NGOs, including AIDS-related NGOs.

Prevention of HIV infection, retention of patients in chronic care, and retention of physicians in the public sector need urgent attention for effective and sustainable HIV/AIDS and health systems responses in the long term.

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Patients on ART in Ethiopia, January 2006–June 2008.
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pmed-1000056-g001: Patients on ART in Ethiopia, January 2006–June 2008.

Mentions: The number of patients ever started on ART increased from 900 at the beginning of 2005 to more than 150,000 by June 2008 (Figure 1); and the number of patients enrolled for ART has also increased from 2,700 to 5,000 per month. The proportion of women and children, out of the total number of patients who received ART, increased from 25% in 2005 to 55% in 2008; the proportion of patients receiving ART outside Addis Ababa increased from 35% in 2005 to 75% in 2008 [18]. This has happened following the establishment of the decentralized and free ART program in the country since 2005. The number of clients receiving HIV counseling and testing services has also increased considerably, from 448,000 (between mid-2004 and mid-2005) to more than 4.5 million (between mid-2007 and mid-2008) [18].


Rapid scale-up of antiretroviral treatment in Ethiopia: successes and system-wide effects.

Assefa Y, Jerene D, Lulseged S, Ooms G, Van Damme W - PLoS Med. (2009)

Patients on ART in Ethiopia, January 2006–June 2008.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2667265&req=5

pmed-1000056-g001: Patients on ART in Ethiopia, January 2006–June 2008.
Mentions: The number of patients ever started on ART increased from 900 at the beginning of 2005 to more than 150,000 by June 2008 (Figure 1); and the number of patients enrolled for ART has also increased from 2,700 to 5,000 per month. The proportion of women and children, out of the total number of patients who received ART, increased from 25% in 2005 to 55% in 2008; the proportion of patients receiving ART outside Addis Ababa increased from 35% in 2005 to 75% in 2008 [18]. This has happened following the establishment of the decentralized and free ART program in the country since 2005. The number of clients receiving HIV counseling and testing services has also increased considerably, from 448,000 (between mid-2004 and mid-2005) to more than 4.5 million (between mid-2007 and mid-2008) [18].

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Programs Department, National HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control Office, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. yibeltalassefa343@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

There has been substantial expansion of access to ART and HIV counseling and testing in Ethiopia, whilst maintaining the performance of other health programs such as tuberculosis and maternal and child health services.

Task shifting to the health officers, nurses, and health extension workers is thought to be responsible for these successes.

However, HIV prevention interventions and management of chronic care patients are lagging behind. This may be due to lack of attention to these health care areas and to physicians leaving the public sector for NGOs, including AIDS-related NGOs.

Prevention of HIV infection, retention of patients in chronic care, and retention of physicians in the public sector need urgent attention for effective and sustainable HIV/AIDS and health systems responses in the long term.

Show MeSH