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Incidental retrieval of emotional contexts in post-traumatic stress disorder and depression: an fMRI study.

Whalley MG, Rugg MD, Smith AP, Dolan RJ, Brewin CR - Brain Cogn (2008)

Bottom Line: In the study phase of the task neutral pictures were presented in emotional or neutral contexts.Activity common to all three groups when correctly judging pictures encoded in emotional contexts was much more limited.Relative to the control and depressed groups the PTSD group exhibited greater sensitivity to correctly recognised stimuli in the left amygdala/ventral striatum and right occipital cortex, and more specific sensitivity to items encoded in emotional contexts in the right precuneus, left superior frontal gyrus, and bilateral insula.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sub-Department of Clinical Health Psychology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK.

ABSTRACT
In the present study, we used fMRI to assess patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or depression, and trauma-exposed controls, during an episodic memory retrieval task that included non-trauma-related emotional information. In the study phase of the task neutral pictures were presented in emotional or neutral contexts. Participants were scanned during the test phase, when they were presented with old and new neutral images in a yes/no recognition memory task. fMRI results for the contrast between old and new items revealed activation in a predominantly left-sided network of cortical regions including the left middle temporal, bilateral posterior cingulate, and left prefrontal cortices. Activity common to all three groups when correctly judging pictures encoded in emotional contexts was much more limited. Relative to the control and depressed groups the PTSD group exhibited greater sensitivity to correctly recognised stimuli in the left amygdala/ventral striatum and right occipital cortex, and more specific sensitivity to items encoded in emotional contexts in the right precuneus, left superior frontal gyrus, and bilateral insula. These results are consistent with a substantially intact neural system supporting episodic retrieval in patients suffering from PTSD. Moreover, there was little indication that PTSD is associated with a marked change in the way negatively valenced information, not of personal significance, is processed.

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Activity common to all three groups for the (A) old > new, (B) emotional hit > neutral hit contrasts. Projected on to (A) surface representation, (B) representative subject’s anatomy. All contrasts thresholded at p < .001 uncorrected.
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fig2: Activity common to all three groups for the (A) old > new, (B) emotional hit > neutral hit contrasts. Projected on to (A) surface representation, (B) representative subject’s anatomy. All contrasts thresholded at p < .001 uncorrected.

Mentions: Effects common to all three groups for the hits > correct rejection contrast revealed significant activations in a broad range of predominantly left-sided regions including left prefrontal cortex, caudate, precuneus, cingulate cortex, middle temporal gyrus, and in the right temporal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus and middle frontal gyrus, as shown in Fig. 2. These areas are similar to those reported in previous studies of recognition memory (Henson, Rugg, Shallice, Josephs, & Dolan, 1999; Smith et al., 2004; Smith et al., 2005; Yonelinas, Otten, Shaw, & Rugg, 2005; see Rugg, Otten, & Henson, 2002 for review).


Incidental retrieval of emotional contexts in post-traumatic stress disorder and depression: an fMRI study.

Whalley MG, Rugg MD, Smith AP, Dolan RJ, Brewin CR - Brain Cogn (2008)

Activity common to all three groups for the (A) old > new, (B) emotional hit > neutral hit contrasts. Projected on to (A) surface representation, (B) representative subject’s anatomy. All contrasts thresholded at p < .001 uncorrected.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2666800&req=5

fig2: Activity common to all three groups for the (A) old > new, (B) emotional hit > neutral hit contrasts. Projected on to (A) surface representation, (B) representative subject’s anatomy. All contrasts thresholded at p < .001 uncorrected.
Mentions: Effects common to all three groups for the hits > correct rejection contrast revealed significant activations in a broad range of predominantly left-sided regions including left prefrontal cortex, caudate, precuneus, cingulate cortex, middle temporal gyrus, and in the right temporal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus and middle frontal gyrus, as shown in Fig. 2. These areas are similar to those reported in previous studies of recognition memory (Henson, Rugg, Shallice, Josephs, & Dolan, 1999; Smith et al., 2004; Smith et al., 2005; Yonelinas, Otten, Shaw, & Rugg, 2005; see Rugg, Otten, & Henson, 2002 for review).

Bottom Line: In the study phase of the task neutral pictures were presented in emotional or neutral contexts.Activity common to all three groups when correctly judging pictures encoded in emotional contexts was much more limited.Relative to the control and depressed groups the PTSD group exhibited greater sensitivity to correctly recognised stimuli in the left amygdala/ventral striatum and right occipital cortex, and more specific sensitivity to items encoded in emotional contexts in the right precuneus, left superior frontal gyrus, and bilateral insula.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sub-Department of Clinical Health Psychology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK.

ABSTRACT
In the present study, we used fMRI to assess patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or depression, and trauma-exposed controls, during an episodic memory retrieval task that included non-trauma-related emotional information. In the study phase of the task neutral pictures were presented in emotional or neutral contexts. Participants were scanned during the test phase, when they were presented with old and new neutral images in a yes/no recognition memory task. fMRI results for the contrast between old and new items revealed activation in a predominantly left-sided network of cortical regions including the left middle temporal, bilateral posterior cingulate, and left prefrontal cortices. Activity common to all three groups when correctly judging pictures encoded in emotional contexts was much more limited. Relative to the control and depressed groups the PTSD group exhibited greater sensitivity to correctly recognised stimuli in the left amygdala/ventral striatum and right occipital cortex, and more specific sensitivity to items encoded in emotional contexts in the right precuneus, left superior frontal gyrus, and bilateral insula. These results are consistent with a substantially intact neural system supporting episodic retrieval in patients suffering from PTSD. Moreover, there was little indication that PTSD is associated with a marked change in the way negatively valenced information, not of personal significance, is processed.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus