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Overexpression of UbcH10 alternates the cell cycle profile and accelerate the tumor proliferation in colon cancer.

Fujita T, Ikeda H, Taira N, Hatoh S, Naito M, Doihara H - BMC Cancer (2009)

Bottom Line: UbcH10 participates in proper metaphase to anaphase transition, and abrogation of UbcH10 results in the premature separation of sister chromatids.Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that UbcH10 was significantly higher in colon cancer tissue compared with normal colon epithelia.Furthermore, the clinicopathological evaluation revealed that UbcH10 was associated with high-grade histological tumors.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cancer and Thoracic Surgery, Okayama University School of Medicine, Okayama, Japan. cqs03255@nifty.com

ABSTRACT

Background: UbcH10 participates in proper metaphase to anaphase transition, and abrogation of UbcH10 results in the premature separation of sister chromatids. To assess the potential role of UbcH10 in colon cancer progression, we analyzed the clinicopathological relevance of UbcH10 in colon cancer.

Methods: We firstly screened the expression profile of UbcH10 in various types of cancer tissues as well as cell lines. Thereafter, using the colon cancer cells line, we manipulated the expression of UbcH10 and evaluated the cell cycle profile and cellular proliferations. Furthermore, the clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 was immunohistologically evaluated in patients with colon cancer. Statistical analysis was performed using the student's t-test and Chi-square test.

Results: Using the colon cancer cells, depletion of UbcH10 resulted in suppression of cellular growth whereas overexpression of UbcH10 promoted the cellular growth and oncogenic cellular growth. Mitotic population was markedly alternated by the manipulation of UbcH10 expression. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that UbcH10 was significantly higher in colon cancer tissue compared with normal colon epithelia. Furthermore, the clinicopathological evaluation revealed that UbcH10 was associated with high-grade histological tumors.

Conclusion: The results show the clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 in the progression of colon cancer. Thus UbcH10 may act as a novel biomarker in patients with colon cancer.

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The clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 in patients with colon cancer. (A) Representative picture of negatively or positively stained colon tissue samples. (B) Representative picture of breast cancer tissues immunohistochemically tested for UbcH10. UbcH10 was more abundantly expressed in grade 3 tumors compared with grade 1 tumors. There was no remarkable difference in UbcH10 cellular localization with regard to histological grade, whereas UbcH10 was relatively highly detected in the nucleus. (C) Summary of the level of UbcH10 and histological grade (G1-3) in patients with colon cancer.
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Figure 4: The clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 in patients with colon cancer. (A) Representative picture of negatively or positively stained colon tissue samples. (B) Representative picture of breast cancer tissues immunohistochemically tested for UbcH10. UbcH10 was more abundantly expressed in grade 3 tumors compared with grade 1 tumors. There was no remarkable difference in UbcH10 cellular localization with regard to histological grade, whereas UbcH10 was relatively highly detected in the nucleus. (C) Summary of the level of UbcH10 and histological grade (G1-3) in patients with colon cancer.

Mentions: A potential function of UbcH10 in promoting progression of colon cancer via regulation of mitotic checkpoint can be revealed from the previous experiment. To correlate our in vitro results to clinical or pathological relevance, we evaluated the clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 in patients with colon cancer. In this study, we used an independent set of 150 colon-neoplasm samples that included four different types of normal colon epithelium as controls. We analyzed the patient age, gender, tumor size, lymph node status (N0-2), histological grade (G1-3), and histological type of tumor and evaluated the clinicopathological relevance of UbcH10 in these patients. Among the 150 patients, 69 patients (46.0%) were histologically positive for UbcH10 and none of the controls were UbcH10 positive. This result is consistent with our previous observation (Fig. 1). There were no significant differences between UbcH10 positive and negative cancers with respect to patient age (p = 0.674), gender (p = 0.779), tumor size (p = 0.601), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.587), or histological type of cancer (p = 0.174) (Table 1). However, UbcH10 positive cancer was more frequently and significantly categorized as a high-grade histological tumor [Grade 3; UbcH10 (-): 2.98%, UbcH10 (+): 17.91%] (p < 0.001; Fig 4A–C). Results of this analysis indicate that UbcH10 abundance is correlated with high-grade histological tumors and suggests that higher levels of UbcH10 could be associated with aggressive cellular behavior and a potentially poor prognosis in patients with colon cancer. Taken together, these results show that UbcH10 has a substantial function in promoting colon cancer progression and could be a potential prognostic marker in patients with colon cancer.


Overexpression of UbcH10 alternates the cell cycle profile and accelerate the tumor proliferation in colon cancer.

Fujita T, Ikeda H, Taira N, Hatoh S, Naito M, Doihara H - BMC Cancer (2009)

The clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 in patients with colon cancer. (A) Representative picture of negatively or positively stained colon tissue samples. (B) Representative picture of breast cancer tissues immunohistochemically tested for UbcH10. UbcH10 was more abundantly expressed in grade 3 tumors compared with grade 1 tumors. There was no remarkable difference in UbcH10 cellular localization with regard to histological grade, whereas UbcH10 was relatively highly detected in the nucleus. (C) Summary of the level of UbcH10 and histological grade (G1-3) in patients with colon cancer.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2666760&req=5

Figure 4: The clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 in patients with colon cancer. (A) Representative picture of negatively or positively stained colon tissue samples. (B) Representative picture of breast cancer tissues immunohistochemically tested for UbcH10. UbcH10 was more abundantly expressed in grade 3 tumors compared with grade 1 tumors. There was no remarkable difference in UbcH10 cellular localization with regard to histological grade, whereas UbcH10 was relatively highly detected in the nucleus. (C) Summary of the level of UbcH10 and histological grade (G1-3) in patients with colon cancer.
Mentions: A potential function of UbcH10 in promoting progression of colon cancer via regulation of mitotic checkpoint can be revealed from the previous experiment. To correlate our in vitro results to clinical or pathological relevance, we evaluated the clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 in patients with colon cancer. In this study, we used an independent set of 150 colon-neoplasm samples that included four different types of normal colon epithelium as controls. We analyzed the patient age, gender, tumor size, lymph node status (N0-2), histological grade (G1-3), and histological type of tumor and evaluated the clinicopathological relevance of UbcH10 in these patients. Among the 150 patients, 69 patients (46.0%) were histologically positive for UbcH10 and none of the controls were UbcH10 positive. This result is consistent with our previous observation (Fig. 1). There were no significant differences between UbcH10 positive and negative cancers with respect to patient age (p = 0.674), gender (p = 0.779), tumor size (p = 0.601), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.587), or histological type of cancer (p = 0.174) (Table 1). However, UbcH10 positive cancer was more frequently and significantly categorized as a high-grade histological tumor [Grade 3; UbcH10 (-): 2.98%, UbcH10 (+): 17.91%] (p < 0.001; Fig 4A–C). Results of this analysis indicate that UbcH10 abundance is correlated with high-grade histological tumors and suggests that higher levels of UbcH10 could be associated with aggressive cellular behavior and a potentially poor prognosis in patients with colon cancer. Taken together, these results show that UbcH10 has a substantial function in promoting colon cancer progression and could be a potential prognostic marker in patients with colon cancer.

Bottom Line: UbcH10 participates in proper metaphase to anaphase transition, and abrogation of UbcH10 results in the premature separation of sister chromatids.Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that UbcH10 was significantly higher in colon cancer tissue compared with normal colon epithelia.Furthermore, the clinicopathological evaluation revealed that UbcH10 was associated with high-grade histological tumors.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cancer and Thoracic Surgery, Okayama University School of Medicine, Okayama, Japan. cqs03255@nifty.com

ABSTRACT

Background: UbcH10 participates in proper metaphase to anaphase transition, and abrogation of UbcH10 results in the premature separation of sister chromatids. To assess the potential role of UbcH10 in colon cancer progression, we analyzed the clinicopathological relevance of UbcH10 in colon cancer.

Methods: We firstly screened the expression profile of UbcH10 in various types of cancer tissues as well as cell lines. Thereafter, using the colon cancer cells line, we manipulated the expression of UbcH10 and evaluated the cell cycle profile and cellular proliferations. Furthermore, the clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 was immunohistologically evaluated in patients with colon cancer. Statistical analysis was performed using the student's t-test and Chi-square test.

Results: Using the colon cancer cells, depletion of UbcH10 resulted in suppression of cellular growth whereas overexpression of UbcH10 promoted the cellular growth and oncogenic cellular growth. Mitotic population was markedly alternated by the manipulation of UbcH10 expression. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that UbcH10 was significantly higher in colon cancer tissue compared with normal colon epithelia. Furthermore, the clinicopathological evaluation revealed that UbcH10 was associated with high-grade histological tumors.

Conclusion: The results show the clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 in the progression of colon cancer. Thus UbcH10 may act as a novel biomarker in patients with colon cancer.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus