Limits...
Overexpression of UbcH10 alternates the cell cycle profile and accelerate the tumor proliferation in colon cancer.

Fujita T, Ikeda H, Taira N, Hatoh S, Naito M, Doihara H - BMC Cancer (2009)

Bottom Line: UbcH10 participates in proper metaphase to anaphase transition, and abrogation of UbcH10 results in the premature separation of sister chromatids.Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that UbcH10 was significantly higher in colon cancer tissue compared with normal colon epithelia.Furthermore, the clinicopathological evaluation revealed that UbcH10 was associated with high-grade histological tumors.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cancer and Thoracic Surgery, Okayama University School of Medicine, Okayama, Japan. cqs03255@nifty.com

ABSTRACT

Background: UbcH10 participates in proper metaphase to anaphase transition, and abrogation of UbcH10 results in the premature separation of sister chromatids. To assess the potential role of UbcH10 in colon cancer progression, we analyzed the clinicopathological relevance of UbcH10 in colon cancer.

Methods: We firstly screened the expression profile of UbcH10 in various types of cancer tissues as well as cell lines. Thereafter, using the colon cancer cells line, we manipulated the expression of UbcH10 and evaluated the cell cycle profile and cellular proliferations. Furthermore, the clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 was immunohistologically evaluated in patients with colon cancer. Statistical analysis was performed using the student's t-test and Chi-square test.

Results: Using the colon cancer cells, depletion of UbcH10 resulted in suppression of cellular growth whereas overexpression of UbcH10 promoted the cellular growth and oncogenic cellular growth. Mitotic population was markedly alternated by the manipulation of UbcH10 expression. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that UbcH10 was significantly higher in colon cancer tissue compared with normal colon epithelia. Furthermore, the clinicopathological evaluation revealed that UbcH10 was associated with high-grade histological tumors.

Conclusion: The results show the clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 in the progression of colon cancer. Thus UbcH10 may act as a novel biomarker in patients with colon cancer.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Aberrant expression of UbcH10 in cancer. (A) Immunohistochemical analysis of the UbcH10-expression profile in various types of cancer including 16 different organs revealed that UbcH10 is highly expressed in cancer compared with its adjacent non-malignant tissues of the colon, breast, lung, ovary, thymus, and uterine cervix. (B) Summary of the UbcH10-expression profile in human tissues. Statistically significant differences were observed in the UbcH10 level between cancer and normal adjacent tissues. (C) Representative picture of the immunohistochemical analysis using normal colon epithelia and colon cancer tissue. UbcH10 is markedly expressed in colon cancer compared with normal colon epithelia. (D) Results of the immunostaining with UbcH10 in colon cancer. Higher levels of UbcH10 appeared in cancer, and it was mainly localized to the nucleus.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2666760&req=5

Figure 1: Aberrant expression of UbcH10 in cancer. (A) Immunohistochemical analysis of the UbcH10-expression profile in various types of cancer including 16 different organs revealed that UbcH10 is highly expressed in cancer compared with its adjacent non-malignant tissues of the colon, breast, lung, ovary, thymus, and uterine cervix. (B) Summary of the UbcH10-expression profile in human tissues. Statistically significant differences were observed in the UbcH10 level between cancer and normal adjacent tissues. (C) Representative picture of the immunohistochemical analysis using normal colon epithelia and colon cancer tissue. UbcH10 is markedly expressed in colon cancer compared with normal colon epithelia. (D) Results of the immunostaining with UbcH10 in colon cancer. Higher levels of UbcH10 appeared in cancer, and it was mainly localized to the nucleus.

Mentions: It has been demonstrated that appropriate mitotic regulation is essential for the proper progression of the cell cycle; else abrogation of mitotic machinery might result in tetraploidy or aneuploidy [8,9]. UbcH10 is thought as an oncogenic potential enhancing carcinogenesis, according to several large genome wide studies as well as cell line based biophysical analysis. Previous biochemical studies have demonstrated that UbcH10 plays a pivotal role in orchestrating the metaphase to anaphase transition via ubiquitin-proteosome pathway [10,20,23], supporting the results of prior epigenetic studies. We analyzed UbcH10 expression in various types of cancers to further validate the oncogenic potential of UbcH10 in malignant tumors status. Using a tissue array, we scored the staining intensity of more than 500 tissue samples that had 16 types of cancer together with non-malignant tissues. UbcH10 was highly expressed in several cancer types compared with the adjacent non-malignant area (Fig. 1A). Staining was significantly more intense between breast, colon, lung, ovary, and cervical cancer tissues than in non-malignant tissue (Fig. 1B, C), and UbcH10 was most predominantly seen in the nucleus but could also be found in the cytoplasm of colon cancer cells (Fig. 1D). There was no significant difference in UbcH10 cellular localization between colon cancer and normal colon epithelial tissues (data was not shown). Taken together, based on immonohistochemical analysis, these results imply that impairment of cell cycle regulation by aberrant UbcH10 may be related with colon cancer.


Overexpression of UbcH10 alternates the cell cycle profile and accelerate the tumor proliferation in colon cancer.

Fujita T, Ikeda H, Taira N, Hatoh S, Naito M, Doihara H - BMC Cancer (2009)

Aberrant expression of UbcH10 in cancer. (A) Immunohistochemical analysis of the UbcH10-expression profile in various types of cancer including 16 different organs revealed that UbcH10 is highly expressed in cancer compared with its adjacent non-malignant tissues of the colon, breast, lung, ovary, thymus, and uterine cervix. (B) Summary of the UbcH10-expression profile in human tissues. Statistically significant differences were observed in the UbcH10 level between cancer and normal adjacent tissues. (C) Representative picture of the immunohistochemical analysis using normal colon epithelia and colon cancer tissue. UbcH10 is markedly expressed in colon cancer compared with normal colon epithelia. (D) Results of the immunostaining with UbcH10 in colon cancer. Higher levels of UbcH10 appeared in cancer, and it was mainly localized to the nucleus.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2666760&req=5

Figure 1: Aberrant expression of UbcH10 in cancer. (A) Immunohistochemical analysis of the UbcH10-expression profile in various types of cancer including 16 different organs revealed that UbcH10 is highly expressed in cancer compared with its adjacent non-malignant tissues of the colon, breast, lung, ovary, thymus, and uterine cervix. (B) Summary of the UbcH10-expression profile in human tissues. Statistically significant differences were observed in the UbcH10 level between cancer and normal adjacent tissues. (C) Representative picture of the immunohistochemical analysis using normal colon epithelia and colon cancer tissue. UbcH10 is markedly expressed in colon cancer compared with normal colon epithelia. (D) Results of the immunostaining with UbcH10 in colon cancer. Higher levels of UbcH10 appeared in cancer, and it was mainly localized to the nucleus.
Mentions: It has been demonstrated that appropriate mitotic regulation is essential for the proper progression of the cell cycle; else abrogation of mitotic machinery might result in tetraploidy or aneuploidy [8,9]. UbcH10 is thought as an oncogenic potential enhancing carcinogenesis, according to several large genome wide studies as well as cell line based biophysical analysis. Previous biochemical studies have demonstrated that UbcH10 plays a pivotal role in orchestrating the metaphase to anaphase transition via ubiquitin-proteosome pathway [10,20,23], supporting the results of prior epigenetic studies. We analyzed UbcH10 expression in various types of cancers to further validate the oncogenic potential of UbcH10 in malignant tumors status. Using a tissue array, we scored the staining intensity of more than 500 tissue samples that had 16 types of cancer together with non-malignant tissues. UbcH10 was highly expressed in several cancer types compared with the adjacent non-malignant area (Fig. 1A). Staining was significantly more intense between breast, colon, lung, ovary, and cervical cancer tissues than in non-malignant tissue (Fig. 1B, C), and UbcH10 was most predominantly seen in the nucleus but could also be found in the cytoplasm of colon cancer cells (Fig. 1D). There was no significant difference in UbcH10 cellular localization between colon cancer and normal colon epithelial tissues (data was not shown). Taken together, based on immonohistochemical analysis, these results imply that impairment of cell cycle regulation by aberrant UbcH10 may be related with colon cancer.

Bottom Line: UbcH10 participates in proper metaphase to anaphase transition, and abrogation of UbcH10 results in the premature separation of sister chromatids.Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that UbcH10 was significantly higher in colon cancer tissue compared with normal colon epithelia.Furthermore, the clinicopathological evaluation revealed that UbcH10 was associated with high-grade histological tumors.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cancer and Thoracic Surgery, Okayama University School of Medicine, Okayama, Japan. cqs03255@nifty.com

ABSTRACT

Background: UbcH10 participates in proper metaphase to anaphase transition, and abrogation of UbcH10 results in the premature separation of sister chromatids. To assess the potential role of UbcH10 in colon cancer progression, we analyzed the clinicopathological relevance of UbcH10 in colon cancer.

Methods: We firstly screened the expression profile of UbcH10 in various types of cancer tissues as well as cell lines. Thereafter, using the colon cancer cells line, we manipulated the expression of UbcH10 and evaluated the cell cycle profile and cellular proliferations. Furthermore, the clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 was immunohistologically evaluated in patients with colon cancer. Statistical analysis was performed using the student's t-test and Chi-square test.

Results: Using the colon cancer cells, depletion of UbcH10 resulted in suppression of cellular growth whereas overexpression of UbcH10 promoted the cellular growth and oncogenic cellular growth. Mitotic population was markedly alternated by the manipulation of UbcH10 expression. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that UbcH10 was significantly higher in colon cancer tissue compared with normal colon epithelia. Furthermore, the clinicopathological evaluation revealed that UbcH10 was associated with high-grade histological tumors.

Conclusion: The results show the clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 in the progression of colon cancer. Thus UbcH10 may act as a novel biomarker in patients with colon cancer.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus