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Primary care physicians' reported use of pre-screening discussions for prostate cancer screening: a cross-sectional survey.

Linder SK, Hawley ST, Cooper CP, Scholl LE, Jibaja-Weiss M, Volk RJ - BMC Fam Pract (2009)

Bottom Line: Thirteen physicians (20.6%) reported not using prescreening discussions, 45 (71.4%) reported the use of prescreening discussions, and 3 (4.8%) reported neither ordering the PSA test nor discussing it with patients.Beliefs about the scientific evidence and efficacy of screening, ethical concerns regarding patient autonomy, and concerns about time constraints differed between physicians who would and would not try to persuade a patient to be tested.Future research needs to consider the nature of discussions and the degree to which informed decision making is being achieved in clinical practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family and Community Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, USA. skneuper@bcm.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: Professional medical organizations recommend individualized patient decision making about prostate cancer screening. Little is known about primary care physicians' use of pre-screening discussions to promote informed decision making for prostate cancer screening. The aim of this study is to explore physicians' use of pre-screening discussions and reasons why physicians would or would not try to persuade patients to be screened if they initially refuse testing.

Methods: Primary care physicians completed a self-administered survey about prostate cancer screening practices for informed decision making.

Results: Sixty-six physicians (75.9%) completed the survey, and 63 were used in the analysis. Thirteen physicians (20.6%) reported not using prescreening discussions, 45 (71.4%) reported the use of prescreening discussions, and 3 (4.8%) reported neither ordering the PSA test nor discussing it with patients. Sixty-nine percent of physicians who reported not having discussions indicated they were more likely to screen African American patients for prostate cancer, compared to 50% of physicians who reported the use of discussions (Chi-square(1) = 1.62, p = .20). Similarly, 91% of physicians who reported not having discussions indicated they are more likely to screen patients with a family history of prostate cancer, compared to 46% of those who reported the use of discussion (Chi-square(1) = 13.27, p < .001). Beliefs about the scientific evidence and efficacy of screening, ethical concerns regarding patient autonomy, and concerns about time constraints differed between physicians who would and would not try to persuade a patient to be tested.

Conclusion: Although guidelines recommend discussing the risks and benefits of prostate cancer screening, physicians report varying practice styles. Future research needs to consider the nature of discussions and the degree to which informed decision making is being achieved in clinical practice.

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Physicians who would persuade men to have the PSA test after initial refusal.
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Figure 1: Physicians who would persuade men to have the PSA test after initial refusal.

Mentions: Thirteen (20.6%) respondents were classified as ND providers, 45 (71.4%) were D providers, and 3 (4.8%) providers reported neither ordering PSA tests nor discussing testing with patients. Two physicians marked "other." Among the D providers, 20 (44.4%) reported they recommend screening and 25 (55.6%) responded they would let patients decide after discussing harms and benefits (see Figure 1).


Primary care physicians' reported use of pre-screening discussions for prostate cancer screening: a cross-sectional survey.

Linder SK, Hawley ST, Cooper CP, Scholl LE, Jibaja-Weiss M, Volk RJ - BMC Fam Pract (2009)

Physicians who would persuade men to have the PSA test after initial refusal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2666644&req=5

Figure 1: Physicians who would persuade men to have the PSA test after initial refusal.
Mentions: Thirteen (20.6%) respondents were classified as ND providers, 45 (71.4%) were D providers, and 3 (4.8%) providers reported neither ordering PSA tests nor discussing testing with patients. Two physicians marked "other." Among the D providers, 20 (44.4%) reported they recommend screening and 25 (55.6%) responded they would let patients decide after discussing harms and benefits (see Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Thirteen physicians (20.6%) reported not using prescreening discussions, 45 (71.4%) reported the use of prescreening discussions, and 3 (4.8%) reported neither ordering the PSA test nor discussing it with patients.Beliefs about the scientific evidence and efficacy of screening, ethical concerns regarding patient autonomy, and concerns about time constraints differed between physicians who would and would not try to persuade a patient to be tested.Future research needs to consider the nature of discussions and the degree to which informed decision making is being achieved in clinical practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family and Community Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, USA. skneuper@bcm.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: Professional medical organizations recommend individualized patient decision making about prostate cancer screening. Little is known about primary care physicians' use of pre-screening discussions to promote informed decision making for prostate cancer screening. The aim of this study is to explore physicians' use of pre-screening discussions and reasons why physicians would or would not try to persuade patients to be screened if they initially refuse testing.

Methods: Primary care physicians completed a self-administered survey about prostate cancer screening practices for informed decision making.

Results: Sixty-six physicians (75.9%) completed the survey, and 63 were used in the analysis. Thirteen physicians (20.6%) reported not using prescreening discussions, 45 (71.4%) reported the use of prescreening discussions, and 3 (4.8%) reported neither ordering the PSA test nor discussing it with patients. Sixty-nine percent of physicians who reported not having discussions indicated they were more likely to screen African American patients for prostate cancer, compared to 50% of physicians who reported the use of discussions (Chi-square(1) = 1.62, p = .20). Similarly, 91% of physicians who reported not having discussions indicated they are more likely to screen patients with a family history of prostate cancer, compared to 46% of those who reported the use of discussion (Chi-square(1) = 13.27, p < .001). Beliefs about the scientific evidence and efficacy of screening, ethical concerns regarding patient autonomy, and concerns about time constraints differed between physicians who would and would not try to persuade a patient to be tested.

Conclusion: Although guidelines recommend discussing the risks and benefits of prostate cancer screening, physicians report varying practice styles. Future research needs to consider the nature of discussions and the degree to which informed decision making is being achieved in clinical practice.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus