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The role of proteomics in defining the human embryonic secretome.

Katz-Jaffe MG, McReynolds S, Gardner DK, Schoolcraft WB - Mol. Hum. Reprod. (2009)

Bottom Line: Though successful, the field of ART would benefit from a non-invasive quantitative method of viability determination.Advances in proteomic technologies have allowed the non-invasive profiling of the human embryonic secretome with ongoing research focused on correlation with outcome.From a clinical perspective, embryo selection based on morphological assessment and non-invasive analysis of the human embryonic secretome may improve IVF success and lead to routine single embryo transfers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Colorado Center for Reproductive Medicine, Lone Tree, CO 80124, USA. mkatz-jaffe@colocrm.com

ABSTRACT
Non-invasive gamete and embryo assessment is considered an important focus in assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Currently, the selection of embryos for transfer is based on morphological indices. Though successful, the field of ART would benefit from a non-invasive quantitative method of viability determination. Omics technologies, including transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics, have already begun providing evidence that viable gametes and embryos possess unique molecular profiles with potential biomarkers that can be utilized for developmental and/or viability selection. Unlike the human genome that is relatively fixed and steady throughout the human body, the human proteome, estimated at over a million proteins, is more complex, diverse and dynamic. It is the proteins themselves that contribute to the physiological homeostasis in any cell or tissue. Of particular interest in ART is the secretome, those proteins that are produced within the embryo and secreted into the surrounding environment. Defining the human embryonic secretome has the potential to expand our knowledge of embryonic cellular processes, including the complex dialogue between the developing embryo and its maternal environment, and may also assist in identifying those embryos with the highest implantation potential. Advances in proteomic technologies have allowed the non-invasive profiling of the human embryonic secretome with ongoing research focused on correlation with outcome. From a clinical perspective, embryo selection based on morphological assessment and non-invasive analysis of the human embryonic secretome may improve IVF success and lead to routine single embryo transfers.

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A schematic diagram outlining the complexity of cellular function including associated omics technologies; genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics that contribute to the study and understanding of biological systems.
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GAP012F1: A schematic diagram outlining the complexity of cellular function including associated omics technologies; genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics that contribute to the study and understanding of biological systems.

Mentions: Over the last decade, there has been a strong focus on the molecular characterization of various biological systems and disease states. The human genome consists of ∼25 000 genes with the human transcriptome providing researchers with valuable gene expression data. However, it is the human proteome defined as the PROTEin complement to the human genOME that actually dictates cellular function and ultimately determines phenotype (Fig. 1). The proteome itself is dynamic, constantly changing through its own interactions, impacted by both internal and external stimuli. Advances in proteomic technologies have begun to shed light on the diversity and complexity of the human proteome, estimated at over 1 million proteins. A variety of biological samples are under investigation, with an emphasis towards identifying proteins involved in specific disease states, to develop new diagnostic and prognostic assays (Dominguez et al., 2007). Of particular interest to investigators is the secretome, those proteins that are produced by cells and secreted at any given time or under certain physiological conditions (Hathout, 2007). Several types of biological fluids, including serum and conditioned medium, have been analyzed for secreted proteins that may define a particular disease state or progression (Hu et al., 2006; Kulasingam and Diamandis, 2007). A number of putative cancer biomarkers have been discovered from analysis of serum proteomes from a variety of cancer patients. Although very promising, some of the candidate biomarkers are relatively abundant, shared among different human cancers and overexpressed in other human diseases such as autoimmune diseases (Hu et al., 2006). Future validation of candidate cancer biomarkers on large independent patient cohorts is critical. With the development of new sensitive proteomic technologies, investigators are concentrating on discovering low abundant serum proteins that are more sensitive and cancer specific. In this review, we discuss the role of proteomics in examining the mammalian embryonic secretome. Defining and characterizing the mammalian embryonic secretome will expand our knowledge of early embryogenesis, advance our understanding of the embryonic role during implantation and potentially contribute to the development of non-invasive viability assessment.


The role of proteomics in defining the human embryonic secretome.

Katz-Jaffe MG, McReynolds S, Gardner DK, Schoolcraft WB - Mol. Hum. Reprod. (2009)

A schematic diagram outlining the complexity of cellular function including associated omics technologies; genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics that contribute to the study and understanding of biological systems.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2666223&req=5

GAP012F1: A schematic diagram outlining the complexity of cellular function including associated omics technologies; genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics that contribute to the study and understanding of biological systems.
Mentions: Over the last decade, there has been a strong focus on the molecular characterization of various biological systems and disease states. The human genome consists of ∼25 000 genes with the human transcriptome providing researchers with valuable gene expression data. However, it is the human proteome defined as the PROTEin complement to the human genOME that actually dictates cellular function and ultimately determines phenotype (Fig. 1). The proteome itself is dynamic, constantly changing through its own interactions, impacted by both internal and external stimuli. Advances in proteomic technologies have begun to shed light on the diversity and complexity of the human proteome, estimated at over 1 million proteins. A variety of biological samples are under investigation, with an emphasis towards identifying proteins involved in specific disease states, to develop new diagnostic and prognostic assays (Dominguez et al., 2007). Of particular interest to investigators is the secretome, those proteins that are produced by cells and secreted at any given time or under certain physiological conditions (Hathout, 2007). Several types of biological fluids, including serum and conditioned medium, have been analyzed for secreted proteins that may define a particular disease state or progression (Hu et al., 2006; Kulasingam and Diamandis, 2007). A number of putative cancer biomarkers have been discovered from analysis of serum proteomes from a variety of cancer patients. Although very promising, some of the candidate biomarkers are relatively abundant, shared among different human cancers and overexpressed in other human diseases such as autoimmune diseases (Hu et al., 2006). Future validation of candidate cancer biomarkers on large independent patient cohorts is critical. With the development of new sensitive proteomic technologies, investigators are concentrating on discovering low abundant serum proteins that are more sensitive and cancer specific. In this review, we discuss the role of proteomics in examining the mammalian embryonic secretome. Defining and characterizing the mammalian embryonic secretome will expand our knowledge of early embryogenesis, advance our understanding of the embryonic role during implantation and potentially contribute to the development of non-invasive viability assessment.

Bottom Line: Though successful, the field of ART would benefit from a non-invasive quantitative method of viability determination.Advances in proteomic technologies have allowed the non-invasive profiling of the human embryonic secretome with ongoing research focused on correlation with outcome.From a clinical perspective, embryo selection based on morphological assessment and non-invasive analysis of the human embryonic secretome may improve IVF success and lead to routine single embryo transfers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Colorado Center for Reproductive Medicine, Lone Tree, CO 80124, USA. mkatz-jaffe@colocrm.com

ABSTRACT
Non-invasive gamete and embryo assessment is considered an important focus in assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Currently, the selection of embryos for transfer is based on morphological indices. Though successful, the field of ART would benefit from a non-invasive quantitative method of viability determination. Omics technologies, including transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics, have already begun providing evidence that viable gametes and embryos possess unique molecular profiles with potential biomarkers that can be utilized for developmental and/or viability selection. Unlike the human genome that is relatively fixed and steady throughout the human body, the human proteome, estimated at over a million proteins, is more complex, diverse and dynamic. It is the proteins themselves that contribute to the physiological homeostasis in any cell or tissue. Of particular interest in ART is the secretome, those proteins that are produced within the embryo and secreted into the surrounding environment. Defining the human embryonic secretome has the potential to expand our knowledge of embryonic cellular processes, including the complex dialogue between the developing embryo and its maternal environment, and may also assist in identifying those embryos with the highest implantation potential. Advances in proteomic technologies have allowed the non-invasive profiling of the human embryonic secretome with ongoing research focused on correlation with outcome. From a clinical perspective, embryo selection based on morphological assessment and non-invasive analysis of the human embryonic secretome may improve IVF success and lead to routine single embryo transfers.

Show MeSH