Limits...
Abstracts of papers presented at the 2008 pittsburgh conference.

Stockwell PB - J Autom Methods Manag Chem (2009)

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Affiliation: P S Analytical, Arthur House, Crayfields Industrial Estate, Main Road, Orpington, Kent BR5 3Hp, UK.

No MeSH data available.


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Mentions: The present paper will describe novel powerful imaging for X-rayfluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). So far, the scanning-typeimaging has been widely used in those techniques. Though recent progress inhigh-spatial-resolution imaging using synchrotrons is wonderful, there has beena clear limit; because of the step scan, the imaging requires a long measuringtime. In many scientific applications, X-ray imaging that is much more rapid (e.g.,capable of high-speed resolution rather than high-spatial resolution) can beextremely important. As shown in Figure 3, it is possible to do X-ray imaging without performingany scans. Here, the method uses a quite wide beam, which illuminates the wholesample surface in a low-angle-incidence arrangement (0.5 ∼ 3 deg). The detectorused is a CCD camera working at 30 fr./sec, equipped with a collimator inside,and the distance between the sample surface and the detector is set extremelyclose in order to enhance both spatial resolution and efficiency. Note that theimaging is done with one shot. In the case of XRF imaging, distinguishingelements are required and, therefore, most of the experiments were performedwith monochromatic or quasi-mono-chromatic X-rays. The procedure for XRDimaging uses a combination of exposure and incident X-ray energy scan (or justtuning). Since the present experiment employs a fixed small-angle incidence andalso a fixed diffraction angle of around 90 deg, the diffraction plane here isinclined at about 45 deg from the surface of the specimen. By scanning theenergy of the incident X-rays, one obtains a diffraction peak which correspondsto the lattice spacing. Further instrumental details and many applications willbe presented.


Abstracts of papers presented at the 2008 pittsburgh conference.

Stockwell PB - J Autom Methods Manag Chem (2009)

© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2665694&req=5

Mentions: The present paper will describe novel powerful imaging for X-rayfluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). So far, the scanning-typeimaging has been widely used in those techniques. Though recent progress inhigh-spatial-resolution imaging using synchrotrons is wonderful, there has beena clear limit; because of the step scan, the imaging requires a long measuringtime. In many scientific applications, X-ray imaging that is much more rapid (e.g.,capable of high-speed resolution rather than high-spatial resolution) can beextremely important. As shown in Figure 3, it is possible to do X-ray imaging without performingany scans. Here, the method uses a quite wide beam, which illuminates the wholesample surface in a low-angle-incidence arrangement (0.5 ∼ 3 deg). The detectorused is a CCD camera working at 30 fr./sec, equipped with a collimator inside,and the distance between the sample surface and the detector is set extremelyclose in order to enhance both spatial resolution and efficiency. Note that theimaging is done with one shot. In the case of XRF imaging, distinguishingelements are required and, therefore, most of the experiments were performedwith monochromatic or quasi-mono-chromatic X-rays. The procedure for XRDimaging uses a combination of exposure and incident X-ray energy scan (or justtuning). Since the present experiment employs a fixed small-angle incidence andalso a fixed diffraction angle of around 90 deg, the diffraction plane here isinclined at about 45 deg from the surface of the specimen. By scanning theenergy of the incident X-rays, one obtains a diffraction peak which correspondsto the lattice spacing. Further instrumental details and many applications willbe presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: P S Analytical, Arthur House, Crayfields Industrial Estate, Main Road, Orpington, Kent BR5 3Hp, UK.

No MeSH data available.