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Corneal allograft endothelial cell replacement represents a reparative response to transplant injury.

Gong N, Pleyer U, Ritter T, Knop E, Chen X - Mol. Vis. (2009)

Bottom Line: The corneal transplantation model in an major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I/II disparate Dark Agouti (DA)-Lewis combination was used.The rejection kinetics was observed in 16 cases in which the corneal opacity grade was recorded after grafting and after the onset of rejection.Moreover, although the whole endothelium would be fully recovered after rejection, the ratio of regenerative EC density reached only half of normal levels as long as six months after the transplant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Organ Transplantation, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To elucidate the injury of corneal allograft endothelial cells (ECs) upon rejection and the subsequent replacement process of the cells.

Methods: The corneal transplantation model in an major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I/II disparate Dark Agouti (DA)-Lewis combination was used. The rejection kinetics was observed in 16 cases in which the corneal opacity grade was recorded after grafting and after the onset of rejection. Four normal corneas and four allografts were subjected to EC staining to investigate the EC integrity in cases of rejection. Furthermore, a series of rejected allografts were examined and the EC integrity compared at one week, three weeks, three months, and six months after the onset of rejection.

Results: All corneal allografts were rejected, resulting in EC integrity loss. However, the allografts recovered transparency around 18 days after the onset of rejection with repaired endothelium by regenerative ECs. Moreover, although the whole endothelium would be fully recovered after rejection, the ratio of regenerative EC density reached only half of normal levels as long as six months after the transplant.

Conclusions: Corneal allograft EC replacement represents a reparative response to transplant-related injury.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Recovery process of the corneal allograft transparency after rejection onset. Following rejection onset, the number of allografts was documented until all of them regained completely clarity up to 22 days based on their opacity grade. Grade 4/3 (black) represents grafts rejected, grade 2/1 (gray) represents grafts recovering, and grade 0 (blank) represents grafts recovered.
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f2: Recovery process of the corneal allograft transparency after rejection onset. Following rejection onset, the number of allografts was documented until all of them regained completely clarity up to 22 days based on their opacity grade. Grade 4/3 (black) represents grafts rejected, grade 2/1 (gray) represents grafts recovering, and grade 0 (blank) represents grafts recovered.

Mentions: We continued our observation of the graft opacity after rejection among the 16 animals. It was a constant phenomenon that all of the grafts would recover clarity gradually from grade 4/3 back to grade 0, which indicated a well functioning EC layer covering the endothelium. Among all 16 animals, the longest time for clarity recovery took 22 days. The alteration of opacity grade of these allografts was shown in Figure 2. The opacity grade of the transplants was recorded daily for 22 days after rejection, and the numbers of transplants with opacity grade 4/3 (rejection), 2/1 (recovering), and 0 (recovered) used to document the recovery process were also recorded. From rejection onset to grade 2 (a key step indicating the beginning of function recovery), the duration was 8.9±4.1 days. From rejection onset to grade 0 (full-functioning), the duration was 18.3±2.2 days. Once the opacity grade had recovered, the cornea maintained stable clarity during the whole observation up to six months.


Corneal allograft endothelial cell replacement represents a reparative response to transplant injury.

Gong N, Pleyer U, Ritter T, Knop E, Chen X - Mol. Vis. (2009)

Recovery process of the corneal allograft transparency after rejection onset. Following rejection onset, the number of allografts was documented until all of them regained completely clarity up to 22 days based on their opacity grade. Grade 4/3 (black) represents grafts rejected, grade 2/1 (gray) represents grafts recovering, and grade 0 (blank) represents grafts recovered.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2664843&req=5

f2: Recovery process of the corneal allograft transparency after rejection onset. Following rejection onset, the number of allografts was documented until all of them regained completely clarity up to 22 days based on their opacity grade. Grade 4/3 (black) represents grafts rejected, grade 2/1 (gray) represents grafts recovering, and grade 0 (blank) represents grafts recovered.
Mentions: We continued our observation of the graft opacity after rejection among the 16 animals. It was a constant phenomenon that all of the grafts would recover clarity gradually from grade 4/3 back to grade 0, which indicated a well functioning EC layer covering the endothelium. Among all 16 animals, the longest time for clarity recovery took 22 days. The alteration of opacity grade of these allografts was shown in Figure 2. The opacity grade of the transplants was recorded daily for 22 days after rejection, and the numbers of transplants with opacity grade 4/3 (rejection), 2/1 (recovering), and 0 (recovered) used to document the recovery process were also recorded. From rejection onset to grade 2 (a key step indicating the beginning of function recovery), the duration was 8.9±4.1 days. From rejection onset to grade 0 (full-functioning), the duration was 18.3±2.2 days. Once the opacity grade had recovered, the cornea maintained stable clarity during the whole observation up to six months.

Bottom Line: The corneal transplantation model in an major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I/II disparate Dark Agouti (DA)-Lewis combination was used.The rejection kinetics was observed in 16 cases in which the corneal opacity grade was recorded after grafting and after the onset of rejection.Moreover, although the whole endothelium would be fully recovered after rejection, the ratio of regenerative EC density reached only half of normal levels as long as six months after the transplant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Organ Transplantation, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To elucidate the injury of corneal allograft endothelial cells (ECs) upon rejection and the subsequent replacement process of the cells.

Methods: The corneal transplantation model in an major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I/II disparate Dark Agouti (DA)-Lewis combination was used. The rejection kinetics was observed in 16 cases in which the corneal opacity grade was recorded after grafting and after the onset of rejection. Four normal corneas and four allografts were subjected to EC staining to investigate the EC integrity in cases of rejection. Furthermore, a series of rejected allografts were examined and the EC integrity compared at one week, three weeks, three months, and six months after the onset of rejection.

Results: All corneal allografts were rejected, resulting in EC integrity loss. However, the allografts recovered transparency around 18 days after the onset of rejection with repaired endothelium by regenerative ECs. Moreover, although the whole endothelium would be fully recovered after rejection, the ratio of regenerative EC density reached only half of normal levels as long as six months after the transplant.

Conclusions: Corneal allograft EC replacement represents a reparative response to transplant-related injury.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus