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A new dawn for the use of traditional Chinese medicine in cancer therapy.

Parekh HS, Liu G, Wei MQ - Mol. Cancer (2009)

Bottom Line: Although traditional Chinese medicine has benefitted one fifth of the world's population in treating a plethora of diseases, its acceptance as a real therapeutic option by the West is only now emerging.In light of a new wave of recognition being given to traditional Chinese medicine by health professionals and regulatory bodies in the West, an understanding of their molecular basis and highlighting potential future applications of a proven group of traditional Chinese medicine in the treatment of a variety of cancers is crucial - this is where their calling holds much hope and promise in both animal and human trials.Furthermore, the rationale for combining conventional agents and modern biotechnological approaches to the delivery of traditional Chinese medicine is an avenue set to revolutionize the future practice of cancer medicine - and this may well bring on a new dawn of therapeutic strategies where East truly meets West.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: The University of Queensland, School of Pharmacy, Brisbane, Australia. h.parekh@pharmacy.uq.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Although traditional Chinese medicine has benefitted one fifth of the world's population in treating a plethora of diseases, its acceptance as a real therapeutic option by the West is only now emerging. In light of a new wave of recognition being given to traditional Chinese medicine by health professionals and regulatory bodies in the West, an understanding of their molecular basis and highlighting potential future applications of a proven group of traditional Chinese medicine in the treatment of a variety of cancers is crucial - this is where their calling holds much hope and promise in both animal and human trials. Furthermore, the rationale for combining conventional agents and modern biotechnological approaches to the delivery of traditional Chinese medicine is an avenue set to revolutionize the future practice of cancer medicine - and this may well bring on a new dawn of therapeutic strategies where East truly meets West.

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Plant (A) and root (B) of Curcuma longa ('curcumin') where root scale is shown as 1 cm.
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Figure 4: Plant (A) and root (B) of Curcuma longa ('curcumin') where root scale is shown as 1 cm.

Mentions: Angiogenesis – the creation of a healthy vascularised network by a tumour is a key underlying process in the induction and establishment of cancer [50]. It, like apoptosis, involves multi-step biochemical interactions that require activation of cell-signalling pathways, supply of nutrients and a host immune response. A range of TCM such as the Chinese wormwood (Artemisia absinthium – Figure 3), turmeric (Curcuma longa – Figure 4) and Scutellaria Baicalensis are commonly employed by traditional practitioners and studies demonstrate that their actions are at least in-part achieved by blocking the critical process of tumour vascularisation [51]. In order for cancer cells to grow and develop a healthy network of blood vessels high sources of nutrients and oxygen are vital. The rapidly dividing cells are subject to a hypoxic environment, so failure to set-up this fundamental framework results in stunted growth of the tumour (≤ 1–2 mm) and development of necrosis at its core [52,53]. Starving an established tumour of its blood supply involves an intervention in the complex angiogenic cascade, of which vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is the most reported biomarker [54]. VEGF production is considered essential for angiogenesis and cancer metastasis, with high titres being indicative of a poor prognosis [55]. A wide array of oncogenes (e.g. ras, HER-2, p53 and C-jun) and growth factors (EGF, TGF, IGF and PDGF) have been identified as up-regulating VEGF-mRNA and so TCM that inhibits their expression and production, respectively, are also considered invaluable tools in cancer therapy.


A new dawn for the use of traditional Chinese medicine in cancer therapy.

Parekh HS, Liu G, Wei MQ - Mol. Cancer (2009)

Plant (A) and root (B) of Curcuma longa ('curcumin') where root scale is shown as 1 cm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2664781&req=5

Figure 4: Plant (A) and root (B) of Curcuma longa ('curcumin') where root scale is shown as 1 cm.
Mentions: Angiogenesis – the creation of a healthy vascularised network by a tumour is a key underlying process in the induction and establishment of cancer [50]. It, like apoptosis, involves multi-step biochemical interactions that require activation of cell-signalling pathways, supply of nutrients and a host immune response. A range of TCM such as the Chinese wormwood (Artemisia absinthium – Figure 3), turmeric (Curcuma longa – Figure 4) and Scutellaria Baicalensis are commonly employed by traditional practitioners and studies demonstrate that their actions are at least in-part achieved by blocking the critical process of tumour vascularisation [51]. In order for cancer cells to grow and develop a healthy network of blood vessels high sources of nutrients and oxygen are vital. The rapidly dividing cells are subject to a hypoxic environment, so failure to set-up this fundamental framework results in stunted growth of the tumour (≤ 1–2 mm) and development of necrosis at its core [52,53]. Starving an established tumour of its blood supply involves an intervention in the complex angiogenic cascade, of which vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is the most reported biomarker [54]. VEGF production is considered essential for angiogenesis and cancer metastasis, with high titres being indicative of a poor prognosis [55]. A wide array of oncogenes (e.g. ras, HER-2, p53 and C-jun) and growth factors (EGF, TGF, IGF and PDGF) have been identified as up-regulating VEGF-mRNA and so TCM that inhibits their expression and production, respectively, are also considered invaluable tools in cancer therapy.

Bottom Line: Although traditional Chinese medicine has benefitted one fifth of the world's population in treating a plethora of diseases, its acceptance as a real therapeutic option by the West is only now emerging.In light of a new wave of recognition being given to traditional Chinese medicine by health professionals and regulatory bodies in the West, an understanding of their molecular basis and highlighting potential future applications of a proven group of traditional Chinese medicine in the treatment of a variety of cancers is crucial - this is where their calling holds much hope and promise in both animal and human trials.Furthermore, the rationale for combining conventional agents and modern biotechnological approaches to the delivery of traditional Chinese medicine is an avenue set to revolutionize the future practice of cancer medicine - and this may well bring on a new dawn of therapeutic strategies where East truly meets West.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: The University of Queensland, School of Pharmacy, Brisbane, Australia. h.parekh@pharmacy.uq.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Although traditional Chinese medicine has benefitted one fifth of the world's population in treating a plethora of diseases, its acceptance as a real therapeutic option by the West is only now emerging. In light of a new wave of recognition being given to traditional Chinese medicine by health professionals and regulatory bodies in the West, an understanding of their molecular basis and highlighting potential future applications of a proven group of traditional Chinese medicine in the treatment of a variety of cancers is crucial - this is where their calling holds much hope and promise in both animal and human trials. Furthermore, the rationale for combining conventional agents and modern biotechnological approaches to the delivery of traditional Chinese medicine is an avenue set to revolutionize the future practice of cancer medicine - and this may well bring on a new dawn of therapeutic strategies where East truly meets West.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus