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Gold-Speckled Multimodal Nanoparticles for Noninvasive Bioimaging.

Sharma P, Brown SC, Bengtsson N, Zhang Q, Walter GA, Grobmyer SR, Santra S, Jiang H, Scott EW, Moudgil BM - Chem Mater (2008)

Bottom Line: Multimodal Gold-speckled silica nanoparticles as contrast agents for noninvasive imaging with magnetic resonance imaging and photoacoustic tomography have been prepared in a simple one-pot synthesis using nonionic microemulsions.Magnetic resonance contrast is provided through gadolinium incorporated in the silica matrix, whereas the photoacoustic signal originates from nonuniform, discontinuous gold nanodomains speckled across the silica surface.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Materials Science and Engineering and Particle Engineering Research Center, Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Biomedical Engineering, Physiology and Functional Genomics, and Department of Surgery, University of Florida, P.O. Box 116135 Gainesville, Florida 32611, and NanoScience Technology Center, Chemistry and Biomolecular Science Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826.

ABSTRACT
Multimodal Gold-speckled silica nanoparticles as contrast agents for noninvasive imaging with magnetic resonance imaging and photoacoustic tomography have been prepared in a simple one-pot synthesis using nonionic microemulsions. Magnetic resonance contrast is provided through gadolinium incorporated in the silica matrix, whereas the photoacoustic signal originates from nonuniform, discontinuous gold nanodomains speckled across the silica surface.

No MeSH data available.


Panel I shows the position of J 774 macrophage cells labeled with GSS nanoparticles marked as A, and unlabeled cells B, in the tissue-like phantom. Panel II shows the PAT image, panel III is the T1-weighted spin−echo image with TR = 500 ms, TE = 6 ms, and panel IV is the T2-weighted spin−echo image with TR = 500 ms, TE = 100 ms.
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fig6: Panel I shows the position of J 774 macrophage cells labeled with GSS nanoparticles marked as A, and unlabeled cells B, in the tissue-like phantom. Panel II shows the PAT image, panel III is the T1-weighted spin−echo image with TR = 500 ms, TE = 6 ms, and panel IV is the T2-weighted spin−echo image with TR = 500 ms, TE = 100 ms.

Mentions: In vitro studies have also been carried out with the GSS nanoparticles to assess the functional ability of the particles in the cellular environment. The uptake of the GSS nanoparticles by J774 macrophages was carried out as explained in the . The cells were then placed in tissue-like phantom and imaged by PAT and MRI in succession. Figure 6 shows the phantom design with the sample placement and the MR and PAT images obtained with the same phantom. It is observed that the cells labeled with the GSS nanoparticles produce a strong PAT contrast as compared to the background. The MR image of the same phantom shows the ability to generate the T1 and T2 contrast. The in vitro experiments demonstrated the capability of the GSS nanoparticles to generate an efficient PAT and MR contrast in living cells, showing potential use of GSS nanoparticles as in vivo cell tracker.


Gold-Speckled Multimodal Nanoparticles for Noninvasive Bioimaging.

Sharma P, Brown SC, Bengtsson N, Zhang Q, Walter GA, Grobmyer SR, Santra S, Jiang H, Scott EW, Moudgil BM - Chem Mater (2008)

Panel I shows the position of J 774 macrophage cells labeled with GSS nanoparticles marked as A, and unlabeled cells B, in the tissue-like phantom. Panel II shows the PAT image, panel III is the T1-weighted spin−echo image with TR = 500 ms, TE = 6 ms, and panel IV is the T2-weighted spin−echo image with TR = 500 ms, TE = 100 ms.
© Copyright Policy - open-access - ccc-price
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2664628&req=5

fig6: Panel I shows the position of J 774 macrophage cells labeled with GSS nanoparticles marked as A, and unlabeled cells B, in the tissue-like phantom. Panel II shows the PAT image, panel III is the T1-weighted spin−echo image with TR = 500 ms, TE = 6 ms, and panel IV is the T2-weighted spin−echo image with TR = 500 ms, TE = 100 ms.
Mentions: In vitro studies have also been carried out with the GSS nanoparticles to assess the functional ability of the particles in the cellular environment. The uptake of the GSS nanoparticles by J774 macrophages was carried out as explained in the . The cells were then placed in tissue-like phantom and imaged by PAT and MRI in succession. Figure 6 shows the phantom design with the sample placement and the MR and PAT images obtained with the same phantom. It is observed that the cells labeled with the GSS nanoparticles produce a strong PAT contrast as compared to the background. The MR image of the same phantom shows the ability to generate the T1 and T2 contrast. The in vitro experiments demonstrated the capability of the GSS nanoparticles to generate an efficient PAT and MR contrast in living cells, showing potential use of GSS nanoparticles as in vivo cell tracker.

Bottom Line: Multimodal Gold-speckled silica nanoparticles as contrast agents for noninvasive imaging with magnetic resonance imaging and photoacoustic tomography have been prepared in a simple one-pot synthesis using nonionic microemulsions.Magnetic resonance contrast is provided through gadolinium incorporated in the silica matrix, whereas the photoacoustic signal originates from nonuniform, discontinuous gold nanodomains speckled across the silica surface.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Materials Science and Engineering and Particle Engineering Research Center, Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Biomedical Engineering, Physiology and Functional Genomics, and Department of Surgery, University of Florida, P.O. Box 116135 Gainesville, Florida 32611, and NanoScience Technology Center, Chemistry and Biomolecular Science Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826.

ABSTRACT
Multimodal Gold-speckled silica nanoparticles as contrast agents for noninvasive imaging with magnetic resonance imaging and photoacoustic tomography have been prepared in a simple one-pot synthesis using nonionic microemulsions. Magnetic resonance contrast is provided through gadolinium incorporated in the silica matrix, whereas the photoacoustic signal originates from nonuniform, discontinuous gold nanodomains speckled across the silica surface.

No MeSH data available.