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Microsaccade rate varies with subjective visibility during motion-induced blindness.

Hsieh PJ, Tse PU - PLoS ONE (2009)

Bottom Line: Here we report the first psychophysical data concerning effects of microsaccade/eyeblink rate upon perceptual switches during MIB.We find that the rate of microsaccades/eyeblink rises before and after perceptual transitions from not seeing to seeing the dot, and decreases before perceptual transitions from seeing it to not seeing it.In addition, event-related fMRI data reveal that, when a dot subjectively reappears during MIB, the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal increases in V1v and V2v and decreases in contralateral hMT+.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Moore Hall, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, United States of America. pjh@mit.edu

ABSTRACT
Motion-induced blindness (MIB) occurs when a dot embedded in a motion field subjectively vanishes. Here we report the first psychophysical data concerning effects of microsaccade/eyeblink rate upon perceptual switches during MIB. We find that the rate of microsaccades/eyeblink rises before and after perceptual transitions from not seeing to seeing the dot, and decreases before perceptual transitions from seeing it to not seeing it. In addition, event-related fMRI data reveal that, when a dot subjectively reappears during MIB, the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal increases in V1v and V2v and decreases in contralateral hMT+. These BOLD signal changes observed upon perceptual state changes in MIB could be driven by the change of perceptual states and/or a confounding factor, such as the microsaccade/eyeblink rate.

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Retinotopy.(a) A typical retinotopic map of the flattened left hemisphere occipital pole for one subject is shown with the approximate borders between the retinotopic areas specified in black. Retinotopic area masks were individually specified for each hemisphere of each subject. Blue here represents the lower vertical meridian, cyan/green the horizontal meridian, and red the vertical meridian. (b) A typical retinotopic map of the flattened left hemisphere occipital pole for one subject is shown with the approximate borders specified in black between the central (<4.6 visual degrees), middle (4.6–7.8 visual degrees), and peripheral (>7.8 visual degrees) areas.
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pone-0005163-g004: Retinotopy.(a) A typical retinotopic map of the flattened left hemisphere occipital pole for one subject is shown with the approximate borders between the retinotopic areas specified in black. Retinotopic area masks were individually specified for each hemisphere of each subject. Blue here represents the lower vertical meridian, cyan/green the horizontal meridian, and red the vertical meridian. (b) A typical retinotopic map of the flattened left hemisphere occipital pole for one subject is shown with the approximate borders specified in black between the central (<4.6 visual degrees), middle (4.6–7.8 visual degrees), and peripheral (>7.8 visual degrees) areas.

Mentions: Regions of interest (ROIs) in the current study include individually specified retinotopic areas V1v, V1d, V2v, V2d, V3v, V3d, V3A/B, and V4v (Figures 4). We focus on these visual areas because it has been shown that neuronal activity in retinotopic visual areas is correlated with perceptual rivalry and attentional modulation [15]. Examining BOLD responses in these areas during MIB should help us to understand whether these phenomena are related. In addition to these areas, localizer scans were performed to isolate hMT+, which is of particular interest in this study because hMT+ is an area of the brain known to process motion [16]–[20].


Microsaccade rate varies with subjective visibility during motion-induced blindness.

Hsieh PJ, Tse PU - PLoS ONE (2009)

Retinotopy.(a) A typical retinotopic map of the flattened left hemisphere occipital pole for one subject is shown with the approximate borders between the retinotopic areas specified in black. Retinotopic area masks were individually specified for each hemisphere of each subject. Blue here represents the lower vertical meridian, cyan/green the horizontal meridian, and red the vertical meridian. (b) A typical retinotopic map of the flattened left hemisphere occipital pole for one subject is shown with the approximate borders specified in black between the central (<4.6 visual degrees), middle (4.6–7.8 visual degrees), and peripheral (>7.8 visual degrees) areas.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2664481&req=5

pone-0005163-g004: Retinotopy.(a) A typical retinotopic map of the flattened left hemisphere occipital pole for one subject is shown with the approximate borders between the retinotopic areas specified in black. Retinotopic area masks were individually specified for each hemisphere of each subject. Blue here represents the lower vertical meridian, cyan/green the horizontal meridian, and red the vertical meridian. (b) A typical retinotopic map of the flattened left hemisphere occipital pole for one subject is shown with the approximate borders specified in black between the central (<4.6 visual degrees), middle (4.6–7.8 visual degrees), and peripheral (>7.8 visual degrees) areas.
Mentions: Regions of interest (ROIs) in the current study include individually specified retinotopic areas V1v, V1d, V2v, V2d, V3v, V3d, V3A/B, and V4v (Figures 4). We focus on these visual areas because it has been shown that neuronal activity in retinotopic visual areas is correlated with perceptual rivalry and attentional modulation [15]. Examining BOLD responses in these areas during MIB should help us to understand whether these phenomena are related. In addition to these areas, localizer scans were performed to isolate hMT+, which is of particular interest in this study because hMT+ is an area of the brain known to process motion [16]–[20].

Bottom Line: Here we report the first psychophysical data concerning effects of microsaccade/eyeblink rate upon perceptual switches during MIB.We find that the rate of microsaccades/eyeblink rises before and after perceptual transitions from not seeing to seeing the dot, and decreases before perceptual transitions from seeing it to not seeing it.In addition, event-related fMRI data reveal that, when a dot subjectively reappears during MIB, the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal increases in V1v and V2v and decreases in contralateral hMT+.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Moore Hall, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, United States of America. pjh@mit.edu

ABSTRACT
Motion-induced blindness (MIB) occurs when a dot embedded in a motion field subjectively vanishes. Here we report the first psychophysical data concerning effects of microsaccade/eyeblink rate upon perceptual switches during MIB. We find that the rate of microsaccades/eyeblink rises before and after perceptual transitions from not seeing to seeing the dot, and decreases before perceptual transitions from seeing it to not seeing it. In addition, event-related fMRI data reveal that, when a dot subjectively reappears during MIB, the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal increases in V1v and V2v and decreases in contralateral hMT+. These BOLD signal changes observed upon perceptual state changes in MIB could be driven by the change of perceptual states and/or a confounding factor, such as the microsaccade/eyeblink rate.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus