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Microsaccade rate varies with subjective visibility during motion-induced blindness.

Hsieh PJ, Tse PU - PLoS ONE (2009)

Bottom Line: Here we report the first psychophysical data concerning effects of microsaccade/eyeblink rate upon perceptual switches during MIB.We find that the rate of microsaccades/eyeblink rises before and after perceptual transitions from not seeing to seeing the dot, and decreases before perceptual transitions from seeing it to not seeing it.In addition, event-related fMRI data reveal that, when a dot subjectively reappears during MIB, the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal increases in V1v and V2v and decreases in contralateral hMT+.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Moore Hall, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, United States of America. pjh@mit.edu

ABSTRACT
Motion-induced blindness (MIB) occurs when a dot embedded in a motion field subjectively vanishes. Here we report the first psychophysical data concerning effects of microsaccade/eyeblink rate upon perceptual switches during MIB. We find that the rate of microsaccades/eyeblink rises before and after perceptual transitions from not seeing to seeing the dot, and decreases before perceptual transitions from seeing it to not seeing it. In addition, event-related fMRI data reveal that, when a dot subjectively reappears during MIB, the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal increases in V1v and V2v and decreases in contralateral hMT+. These BOLD signal changes observed upon perceptual state changes in MIB could be driven by the change of perceptual states and/or a confounding factor, such as the microsaccade/eyeblink rate.

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Rates of microsaccades around the time of a perceptual switch (time 0).The rate of microsaccades rises before and after perceptual transitions from ‘no see’ to ‘see’, and decreases before perceptual transitions from ‘see’ to ‘no see.’ In the two-tailed simple t-test, those data points that are significantly different than the baseline (red line) are marked as * (p<0.05).
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pone-0005163-g003: Rates of microsaccades around the time of a perceptual switch (time 0).The rate of microsaccades rises before and after perceptual transitions from ‘no see’ to ‘see’, and decreases before perceptual transitions from ‘see’ to ‘no see.’ In the two-tailed simple t-test, those data points that are significantly different than the baseline (red line) are marked as * (p<0.05).

Mentions: In each of the four stimulation blocks, a single target dot was presented in one of the four quadrants (left top, left bottom, right top, or right bottom) on a motion background (Figure 1). Subjects were required to indicate their perceptual state by pressing a button. Figures 2 and 3 show that the microsaccade/eyeblink rate was correlated with the type of perceptual switches during MIB. In Figure 2, eyeblink rate was significantly greater than the baseline rate both before and after a perceptual switch to the ‘see’ condition. In contrast, eyeblink rate was significantly smaller than the baseline both before and after a perceptual switch to the ‘no see’ condition. Figure 3 shows that the microsaccade rate was significantly greater than baseline both before and after a perceptual switch to the ‘see’ condition, and was significantly smaller than the baseline only before a perceptual switch to the ‘no see’ condition.


Microsaccade rate varies with subjective visibility during motion-induced blindness.

Hsieh PJ, Tse PU - PLoS ONE (2009)

Rates of microsaccades around the time of a perceptual switch (time 0).The rate of microsaccades rises before and after perceptual transitions from ‘no see’ to ‘see’, and decreases before perceptual transitions from ‘see’ to ‘no see.’ In the two-tailed simple t-test, those data points that are significantly different than the baseline (red line) are marked as * (p<0.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2664481&req=5

pone-0005163-g003: Rates of microsaccades around the time of a perceptual switch (time 0).The rate of microsaccades rises before and after perceptual transitions from ‘no see’ to ‘see’, and decreases before perceptual transitions from ‘see’ to ‘no see.’ In the two-tailed simple t-test, those data points that are significantly different than the baseline (red line) are marked as * (p<0.05).
Mentions: In each of the four stimulation blocks, a single target dot was presented in one of the four quadrants (left top, left bottom, right top, or right bottom) on a motion background (Figure 1). Subjects were required to indicate their perceptual state by pressing a button. Figures 2 and 3 show that the microsaccade/eyeblink rate was correlated with the type of perceptual switches during MIB. In Figure 2, eyeblink rate was significantly greater than the baseline rate both before and after a perceptual switch to the ‘see’ condition. In contrast, eyeblink rate was significantly smaller than the baseline both before and after a perceptual switch to the ‘no see’ condition. Figure 3 shows that the microsaccade rate was significantly greater than baseline both before and after a perceptual switch to the ‘see’ condition, and was significantly smaller than the baseline only before a perceptual switch to the ‘no see’ condition.

Bottom Line: Here we report the first psychophysical data concerning effects of microsaccade/eyeblink rate upon perceptual switches during MIB.We find that the rate of microsaccades/eyeblink rises before and after perceptual transitions from not seeing to seeing the dot, and decreases before perceptual transitions from seeing it to not seeing it.In addition, event-related fMRI data reveal that, when a dot subjectively reappears during MIB, the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal increases in V1v and V2v and decreases in contralateral hMT+.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Moore Hall, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, United States of America. pjh@mit.edu

ABSTRACT
Motion-induced blindness (MIB) occurs when a dot embedded in a motion field subjectively vanishes. Here we report the first psychophysical data concerning effects of microsaccade/eyeblink rate upon perceptual switches during MIB. We find that the rate of microsaccades/eyeblink rises before and after perceptual transitions from not seeing to seeing the dot, and decreases before perceptual transitions from seeing it to not seeing it. In addition, event-related fMRI data reveal that, when a dot subjectively reappears during MIB, the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal increases in V1v and V2v and decreases in contralateral hMT+. These BOLD signal changes observed upon perceptual state changes in MIB could be driven by the change of perceptual states and/or a confounding factor, such as the microsaccade/eyeblink rate.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus